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The Ultimate Averaged Chart - The BBC Chart Re-Imagined

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  • MrTibbs
    replied
    Originally posted by RokinRobinOfLocksley View Post

    Brian, the BMRB numbers look reasonable. However I don't think MM and NME would have dropped to 100 that quickly / Feb 69. From what we know from Alan and Dave and maybe other sources, MM and NME did drop, the question is when. Alan says later, Dave says in 1969, but Dave doesn't say WHEN in 1969, it could have been Dec 31. I just wouldn't think MM and NME would have dropped the very month that BMRB arrived on the scene. They would have keep on chooglin' till some time later.

    BMRB was not immediately accepted by everyone in the 'industry', especially with all the early goofs and ties and low diary turn-ins. Many still went with the superior MM and NME charts, thus no reason for them to reduce until sometime after they lost influence. I need to re-read Alan's and Dave's postings.

    Plus maybe there's info in MM and NME themselves. The now WorldRadioHistory website has every issue of MM from 1969, and some from 1970/71, and all of NME from 1969. Maybe there are articles that point to when a drop occurred...
    I've had a good look last night and this morning through all the issues of NME and MM for 1969 and 1970 on the World Radio History site but don't see any reference to a reduction in store poll size for those years.
    It looks like it was never mentioned when it happened.

    All we know is it was still reportedly 200/250 respectively in February 1969 and most likely the stated 100 by March 1971. I believe the 200/250 would have held through 1969. I say this because MM never mentioned a reduction in store sample taking please and still promoted their chart through 1969 in their paper as the most accurate, and continuing to list the number of daily newspapers still carrying their chart. I don't believe they would have done this if they had cut back at this time. I believe NME would also likely have continued as they were for 1969 in line with this.

    So, I believe a reduction in stages could be applied throughout 1970 to reach the 100 each by March 1971. I think this is both the most practical and fairest way to approach this.

    Let it be written, Let it be done

    Leave a comment:


  • MrTibbs
    replied
    I think his best hit was, That's What Love Will Do, I'm charting that right now as I work on March 1963.

    Leave a comment:


  • Woz1234
    replied
    I Like Joe Brown got his Best Of Album a few years ago.
    Last edited by Woz1234; Sun March 21, 2021, 13:36.

    Leave a comment:


  • MrTibbs
    replied
    You'll have to wait and see

    Leave a comment:


  • Splodj
    replied
    I saw Joe Brown say (half jokingly) that his only number one had been taken away from him. So it will be interesting to see if the Ultimate gives it back!

    Leave a comment:


  • MrTibbs
    replied
    And the party is almost over for Lonnie. He has been a chart stalwart and a huge influence on other artists since he first charted in 1956. He will have one more Top 20 hit later this year and then be swept away amidst so many other regulars we see here as Beatlemania and the other new British groups move in and take hold changing the British music scene for ever.

    Leave a comment:


  • MrTibbs
    replied
    Here is the next Ultimate Averaged Chart for Week Ending May 26th 1962

    The Ultimate Averaged Chart - Week Ending May 26th 1962 NME MM DISC RR Total
    Last This The Sound Survey Stores 80 110 50 30 Points
    Week Week The Top 30 Singles Chart BBC TOP 30 Scored
    1 1 Good Luck Charm - Elvis Presley 1 1 1 1 1 8100
    2 2 Nut Rocker - B. Bumble and The Stingers 2= 3 2 3 2 7700
    3 3 I'm Looking Out The Window / Do You Want To Dance - Cliff Richard 2= 2 3 2 3 7690
    4 4 Wonderful Land - The Shadows 6 6 4 5 6 7020
    5 5 Love Letters - Ketty Lester 5 4 5 8 4 6980
    8 6 As You Like It - Adam Faith 4 5 6 4 5 6960
    6 7 Speak To Me Pretty - Brenda Lee 7 11 7 6 7 6210
    12 8 Last Night Was Made For Love - Billy Fury 8 8 9 7 11 6060
    7 9 Hey Little Girl - Del Shannon 9 14 8 9 8 5680
    21 10 Ginny Come Lately - Brian Hyland 11 10 12 11 10 5400
    18 11 Come Outside - Mike Sarne 12 6 14 10 17 5340
    10 12 When My Little Girl is Smiling - Jimmy Justice 10 16 11 14 9 4910
    28 13 I Don't Know Why - Eden Kane 13 9 17 12 18 4640
    13 14 The Wonderful World Of The Young - Danny Williams 15 15 15 15 13 4380
    16 15 Stranger On The Shore - Mr. Acker Bilk 14 13 10 12 4320
    9 16 Hey Baby - Bruce Channel 16 23 13 13 14 4030
    14 17 Let's Talk About Love - Helen Shapiro 18 17 19 16 23 3430
    15 18 The Party's Over - Lonnie Donegan 19 22 18 19 19 3110
    11 19 Dream Baby - Roy Orbison 26 16 20 22 2870
    20 20 Lonely City - John Leyton 20 25 20 17 20 2720
    27 21 The Green Leaves Of Summer - Kenny Ball 17 12 30 18 24 2490
    24 22 Everybody's Twistin' - Frank Sinatra 21 23 29 1740
    19 23 Twisting The Night Away - Sam Cooke 20 25 28 1630
    22 24 Can't Help Falling In Love / Rock-A-Hula Baby - Elvis Presley 21 16 1550
    30 25 A Picture Of You - Joe Brown 17 29 27 1460
    17 26 Never Goodbye - Karl Denver 24 15 1250
    23 27 Young World - Ricky Nelson 22 26 1140
    26 28 When My Little Girl is Smiling - Craig Douglas 26 21 850
    29 29 Lover Please - The Vernons Girls 23 640
    NEW 30 How Can I Meet Her - The Everly Brothers 27 25 500
    B Unsquare Dance - Dave Brubeck 27 440
    25 King Of Clowns - Neil Sedaka 28 30 360
    B Besame Mucho - Jet Harris 28 240
    B Deep In The Heart Of Texas - Duane Eddy 28 240
    Swinging In The Rain - Norman Vaughan 28 240
    B Jezebel - Marty Wilde 28 240
    Do You Want To Dance - Cliff Richard 19

    Leave a comment:


  • brian05
    replied
    I have a Record Retailer for 4th October 1969 priced at 2s 6d (old money!) bought in a newsagent shop.
    It has the Top 20 for October 12th 1961.

    Leave a comment:


  • MrTibbs
    replied
    The BMRB chart didn't come cheap. Just read in a 1969 edition of MM that the BBC's contribution to the chart back then was 5000 a year.

    Leave a comment:


  • MrTibbs
    replied
    Here is the next Ultimate Averaged Chart for Week Ending May 19th 1962

    The Ultimate Averaged Chart - Week Ending May 19th 1962 NME MM DISC RR Total
    Last This The Sound Survey Stores 80 110 50 30 Points
    Week Week The Top 30 Singles Chart BBC TOP 30 Scored
    9 1 Good Luck Charm - Elvis Presley 1 1 2 1 2 7960
    1 2 Nut Rocker - B. Bumble and The Stingers 2 3 1 2 1 7890
    11 3 I'm Looking Out The Window / Do You Want To Dance - Cliff Richard 3 2 4 3 4 7500
    2 4 Wonderful Land - The Shadows 4 5 3 4 3 7350
    6 5 Love Letters - Ketty Lester 6 4 5 8 6 6920
    3 6 Speak To Me Pretty - Brenda Lee 5 6 6 5 5 6830
    4 7 Hey Little Girl - Del Shannon 8 8 7 7 8 6370
    16 8 As You Like It - Adam Faith 7 7 10 6 7 6200
    5 9 Hey Baby - Bruce Channel 9 10 8 11 10 5840
    7 10 When My Little Girl Is Smiling - Jimmy Justice 10 9 10 13 9 5630
    8 11 Dream Baby - Roy Orbison 12 14 9 12 14 5240
    19 12 Last Night Was Made For Love - Billy Fury 11 12 14 9 15 4970
    10 13 The Wonderful World Of The Young - Danny Williams 13 13 13 14 12 4840
    20 14 Let's Talk About Love - Helen Shapiro 16 16 18 10 26 3830
    14 15 The Party's Over - Lonnie Donegan 19 20 15 18 17 3710
    15 16 Stranger On The Shore - Mr. Acker Bilk 15 18 12 13 3670
    13 17 Never Goodbye - Karl Denver 17 22 20 15 11 3330
    29 18 Come Outside - Mike Sarne 18 11 23 17 29 3240
    12 19 Twisting The Night Away - Sam Cooke 14 15 17 18 3210
    28 20 Lonely City - John Leyton 17 24 19 25 2670
    NEW 21 Ginny Come Lately - Brian Hyland 26 21 16 19 2610
    17 22 Can't Help Falling In Love / Rock-A-Hula Baby - Elvis Presley 20 16 16 2100
    23 23 Young World - Ricky Nelson 27 18 21 2050
    21 24 Everybody's Twistin' - Frank Sinatra 19 25 22 1890
    25 25 King Of Clowns - Neil Sedaka 21 28 23 1370
    18 26 When My Little Girl Is Smiling - Craig Douglas 22 20 1320
    NEW 27 The Green Leaves Of Summer - Kenny Ball 22 20 1270
    NEW 28 I Don't Know Why - Eden Kane 25 29 28 790
    NEW 29 Lover Please - The Vernons Girls 22 720
    24 30 Theme From 'Z Cars' - Johnny Keating 27 24 650
    22 Tell Me What He Said - Helen Shapiro 26 550
    B A Picture Of You - Joe Brown 28 240
    B How Can I Meet Her - The Everly Brothers 29 160
    26 Theme From 'Dr. Kildare' - Johnny Spence 30 30 140
    27 Let's Twist Again - Chubby Checker 27 120
    Johnny Angel - Patti Lynn 30 80
    B Jezebel - Marty Wilde 30 80
    30 Theme From 'Maigret' - Joe Loss

    Leave a comment:


  • Richard M White
    replied
    Originally posted by Metalweb View Post

    Shouldn't that read "changed to Sat -Fri in 1975" ?

    I remember reading somewhere it was because the postal service stopped working Sundays!

    The week was changed from "Mon-Sat" to "Sat-Fri" and yes Tony gave that very explanation in the book

    Leave a comment:


  • MrTibbs
    replied
    Originally posted by RokinRobinOfLocksley View Post

    Brian, the BMRB numbers look reasonable. However I don't think MM and NME would have dropped to 100 that quickly / Feb 69. From what we know from Alan and Dave and maybe other sources, MM and NME did drop, the question is when. Alan says later, Dave says in 1969, but Dave doesn't say WHEN in 1969, it could have been Dec 31. I just wouldn't think MM and NME would have dropped the very month that BMRB arrived on the scene. They would have keep on chooglin' till some time later.

    BMRB was not immediately accepted by everyone in the 'industry', especially with all the early goofs and ties and low diary turn-ins. Many still went with the superior MM and NME charts, thus no reason for them to reduce until sometime after they lost influence. I need to re-read Alan's and Dave's postings.

    Plus maybe there's info in MM and NME themselves. The now WorldRadioHistory website has every issue of MM from 1969, and some from 1970/71, and all of NME from 1969. Maybe there are articles that point to when a drop occurred...
    I think that's a valid point. Of course MM and NME wouldn't immediately drop at the beginning of the BMRB chart run when I think about it. I suppose it's reasonable to think they would carefully watch for a bit to see what it would deliver, how it would be accepted, if indeed the project would fall apart and be abandoned even.
    Like you say MM and NME still had a large readership following their charts so no it would not immediately affect them.

    So it is a case of when like you say. At some point in 1969 as Dave said, or early seventies like Alan said.
    It may well have been a proportionate reduction too between '69 and early seventies.

    I don't think there is any info out there (unless one of you whizz kids out there know better and let me know) on when and how they actually reduced. I too will look over the World Radio History site too for any possible clues.

    Worst case scenario I think, failing that we can't pin down dates any further is to apply a gradual reduction strategy to them both (the opposite of what I did for BMRB) and over the 2 year period gradually reduce from 250/200 to 100 apiece.

    Leave a comment:


  • RokinRobinOfLocksley
    replied
    Originally posted by MrTibbs View Post
    Based on this here is what I am inclined to do once I get around to working on Feb'69 in around a month (I'm on February '63 right now).

    Store Returns to be used 15th February 1969 to 20th March 1971 (end of postal strike)

    BMRB 60 - Feb 69 to July 69
    BMRB 90 - Aug 69 to Jan 70
    BMRB 120 - Feb 70 to July 70
    BMRB 150 - Aug 70 to Jan 71
    BMRB 100 - Feb 71 to Mar 71 (BMRB reduced the chart to a Top 40 as reduced diaries returned due to postal strike)

    MM - 100 Feb 69 to Mar 71

    NME - 100 Feb 69 TO Mar 71

    Do those figures look a good bet for working with ?
    Brian, the BMRB numbers look reasonable. However I don't think MM and NME would have dropped to 100 that quickly / Feb 69. From what we know from Alan and Dave and maybe other sources, MM and NME did drop, the question is when. Alan says later, Dave says in 1969, but Dave doesn't say WHEN in 1969, it could have been Dec 31. I just wouldn't think MM and NME would have dropped the very month that BMRB arrived on the scene. They would have keep on chooglin' till some time later.

    BMRB was not immediately accepted by everyone in the 'industry', especially with all the early goofs and ties and low diary turn-ins. Many still went with the superior MM and NME charts, thus no reason for them to reduce until sometime after they lost influence. I need to re-read Alan's and Dave's postings.

    Plus maybe there's info in MM and NME themselves. The now WorldRadioHistory website has every issue of MM from 1969, and some from 1970/71, and all of NME from 1969. Maybe there are articles that point to when a drop occurred...

    Leave a comment:


  • Metalweb
    replied
    Originally posted by Richard M White View Post
    According to Tony Jasper's The 70s: A Book of Records, the chart week changed from Sat-Fri in 1975 (doesn't say when) and reverted back to Mon-Sat "from the end of September 1978" - the chart week then changed again for 2 months in Jan & Feb 1982 from Friday - Thursday resulting in numerous yo yo performances, in the same way Graham explains above
    Shouldn't that read "changed to Sat -Fri in 1975" ?

    I remember reading somewhere it was because the postal service stopped working Sundays!


    Leave a comment:


  • Richard M White
    replied
    I couldn't agree more!

    Leave a comment:


  • MrTibbs
    replied
    Yeah Richard, the rules were often changed along the way and the goal posts moved. Unfortunately 'Official' doesn't always mean accurate.

    Leave a comment:


  • Richard M White
    replied
    According to Tony Jasper's The 70s: A Book of Records, the chart week changed from Sat-Fri in 1975 (doesn't say when) and reverted back to Mon-Sat "from the end of September 1978" - the chart week then changed again for 2 months in Jan & Feb 1982 from Friday - Thursday resulting in numerous yo yo performances, in the same way Graham explains above

    Leave a comment:


  • Graham76man
    replied
    Neither Smiths or Boots were part of the shops used in 1971. They still were not on board in 1976 when Record Mirror ran an article. Woolies joined at the start of 1975. The stores were not taking part because they didn't want to give sales information to competing firms.
    As somebody pointed out to me the other week on this forum, BMRB changed the sales week in 1976, so it ran from Friday to Thursday. This resulted in some records getting higher slots in their chart, so instead of a record being at 25, which for example could be the furthest it goes. It lands at 20 in the adjusted chart. As it takes in the "quarter" sales of the following week. But in the following week it's in decline and the quarter sales help keep it in the top 40, but lower than 25. The main effect of this week change was on Top of The Pops. So after TOTP performance a record goes into decline, then in the next chart it goes up! For example Tina Charles was on Top of The Pops on Thursday, but on the chart after the show she fell out of the top 50. Then the following week she returns to the chart. Another effect is to shift the number one change, making BMRB chart slower at changing the top seller, by one week. Then it seems that BMRB introduced a policy on records that were declining in sales, removing them before they would have dropped out of the top 50.
    In many ways I think this makes the 1976 BMRB chart one of the worst charts. I don't know how long they kept the altered week.

    Leave a comment:


  • MrTibbs
    replied
    Here is the next Ultimate Averaged Chart for Week Ending May 12th 1962

    The Ultimate Averaged Chart - Week Ending May 12th 1962 NME MM DISC RR Total
    Last This The Sound Survey Stores 80 110 50 30 Points
    Week Week The Top 30 Singles Chart BBC TOP 30 Scored
    3 1 Nut Rocker - B. Bumble and The Stingers 1 1 2 1 2 7960
    1 2 Wonderful Land - The Shadows 2 1 1 4 1 7950
    5 3 Speak To Me Pretty - Brenda Lee 3 5 5 5 3 7080
    4 4 Hey Little Girl - Del Shannon 4 4 4 8 5 7060
    2 5 Hey Baby - Bruce Channel 5 9 3 6 4 6900
    10 6 Love Letters - Ketty Lester 6 8 6 7 6 6540
    7 7 When My Little Girl Is Smiling - Jimmy Justice 7= 6 8 9 12 6200
    6 8 Dream Baby - Roy Orbison 7= 10 7 11 7 6040
    NEW 9 Good Luck Charm - Elvis Presley 7= 3 14 2 16 6010
    12 10 The Wonderful World Of The Young - Danny Williams 10 12 11 12 8 5360
    NEW 11 I'm Looking Out The Window / Do You Want To Dance - Cliff Richard 11 6 19 3 20 5050
    8 12 Twisting The Night Away - Sam Cooke 12 14 12 17 11 4750
    11 13 Never Goodbye - Karl Denver 13 16 15 16 10 4340
    16 14 The Party's Over - Lonnie Donegan 14 13 16 20 9 4300
    15 15 Stranger On The Shore - Mr. Acker Bilk 15 15 10 15 4070
    27 16 As You Like It - Adam Faith 16 11 21 10 23 3990
    9 17 Can't Help Falling In Love / Rock-A-Hula Baby - Elvis Presley 17 20 9 14 3810
    14 18 When My Little Girl Is Smiling - Craig Douglas 18 20 17 18 13 3610
    NEW 19 Last Night Was Made For Love - Billy Fury 19 23 14 26 2840
    NEW 20 Let's Talk About Love - Helen Shapiro 19= 17 26 13 24 2780
    20 21 Everybody's Twistin' - Frank Sinatra 17 25 15 25 2760
    13 22 Tell Me What He Said - Helen Shapiro 19= 13 17 2400
    21 23 Young World - Ricky Nelson 23 20 19 2210
    17 24 Theme From 'Z Cars' - Johnny Keating 18 18 1820
    24 25 King Of Clowns - Neil Sedaka 27 28 19 27 1370
    18 26 Theme From 'Dr. Kildare' - Johnny Spence 22 21 1290
    19 27 Let's Twist Again - Chubby Checker 26 24 28 1260
    NEW 28 Lonely City - John Leyton 24 29 780
    NEW 29 Come Outside - Mike Sarne 22 720
    22 30 Theme From 'Maigret' - Joe Loss 27 22 710
    B Lover Please - The Vernons Girls 25 480
    Johnny Angel - Shelley Fabares 27 320
    Love Me Warm And Tender - Paul Anka 29 29 220
    25 Slow Twistin' - Chubby Checker 30 110
    Don't Break The Heart That Loves You - Connie Francis 30 80
    29 Softly As I Leave You - Matt Monro 30 30
    23 Wimoweh - Karl Denver
    26 A Hole In The Ground - Bernard Cribbins
    28 The Young Ones - Cliff Richard
    30 Caterina - Perry Como

    Leave a comment:


  • Metalweb
    replied
    Originally posted by Robbie View Post
    ^
    Looking at the two sales reports I have the amount of sales needed to chart at number 50 was 178 (Week 31, 1974) and 116 (Week 31, 1975). Number 30 - the broadcast part of the chart - was 430 (1974) and 529 (1975). These are the sales which would be recorded in a 250-shop chart panel so less than a sale per shop to chart inside the top 50 (not every shop may have stocked a wider range of singles) and 2+ copies per shop inside the top 30. For anyone interested, the number 1 single sold 3,821 in Week 31, 1974 (3rd week of 'Rock Your Baby' by George McCrae) and 4,185 in Week 31, 1975 (the sole week at the top for 'Barbados' by Typically Tropical).

    I believe the multiplier which would be applied at the time to turn chart panel sales into total market sales was unofficially either 16 or 17 so 'Rock Your Baby' would be on around 61k to 64k while 'Barbados' would be on 67k to 71k.

    This excellent thread gives the panel sales recorded for the No.50 single for most weeks throughout 1974.

    Varies between 150 and 200 before climbing in December!

    https://www.ukmix.org/forum/chart-di...blers%60/page2

    Leave a comment:


  • MrTibbs
    replied
    Originally posted by Splodj View Post
    Found it. Popscene forum in a thread entitled 'Single chart compilers?' Dave Taylor wrote:

    "In 1969, both NME and MM took a lower sample of shops. Slipping back to 100 a piece. By the 80s, it shrunk even more to like 70 shops."
    Great detective work Splodge, that solves a major problem for me in respect of knowing what reasonable number of store returns to use from Feb '69 for NME and MM.

    For BMRB, I also think both Robbie's and Robin's info is useful. It is obvious, and evidenced, from the two reports that Robbie quoted that even in the mid seventies BMRB at most were only using 225 - 250 diaries that were actually received ( and even some of those I believe would have been inadmissible due to errors) so lets say around 225 in use.

    But we also know, and again supported by lots of evidence from Alan Smith, Dave Taylor, among other sources that in the initial years BMRB were not polling anything like that figure. So this is where I think Robin's suggestion is helpful that increases in polled diary returns be incrementally applied throughout the initial years. This makes sense and is a credible approach.

    So, again with what we know, it is likely that by the time Smiths and Boots came on board in Spring 1971 that is the point when the BMRB chart was realistically polling 200 plus diaries. So again it is probable the diary return was increasing and building toward that figure throughout 1969 and 1970.

    Based on this here is what I am inclined to do once I get around to working on Feb'69 in around a month (I'm on February '63 right now).

    Store Returns to be used 15th February 1969 to 20th March 1971 (end of postal strike)

    BMRB 60 - Feb 69 to July 69
    BMRB 90 - Aug 69 to Jan 70
    BMRB 120 - Feb 70 to July 70
    BMRB 150 - Aug 70 to Jan 71
    BMRB 100 - Feb 71 to Mar 71 (BMRB reduced the chart to a Top 40 as reduced diaries returned due to postal strike)

    MM - 100 Feb 69 to Mar 71

    NME - 100 Feb 69 TO Mar 71

    Do those figures look a good bet for working with ?

    Leave a comment:


  • Splodj
    replied
    Found it. Popscene forum in a thread entitled 'Single chart compilers?' Dave Taylor wrote:

    "In 1969, both NME and MM took a lower sample of shops. Slipping back to 100 a piece. By the 80s, it shrunk even more to like 70 shops."
    Last edited by Splodj; Sat March 20, 2021, 09:39.

    Leave a comment:


  • Splodj
    replied
    I have to admit I am sceptical about this idea that MM and NME maintained their 250/200 sampling for years (if indeed it had been that high anyway) if they did not want to pay to join the new scheme. Despite its teething problems BMRB were successful in establishing themselves as the primary chart, sidelining the others which I would expect to cut back quite quickly.

    And although on this site AS says that (in the 'early 70s') MM went to 200 and NME 100, I seem to recall him or Dave saying elsewhere they both went to 100.

    Leave a comment:


  • Graham76man
    replied
    Originally posted by Robbie View Post
    ^
    Record labels would need to know which dealers were part of the current week's chart panel so the amount of shops to target should not only total 300 (not 150) but also should change each week, or at least some should change each week.
    That was not too difficult to know by the record companies. So they could still target a smaller amount such as 150. The BMRB list would have been a secret, so everyone knew it. And even if you didn't, record company reps had access to the stores with ease. Some could even spot the BMRB diary on the counter. THE BMRB even told the shop to fill it in on purchase of a record. So it couldn't have locked in the manger's office! Reps probably looked at it to see how sales were going! It was later common practice for the reps to fill them in! One record company rep (on Sheffield Forum) said that he knew which stores were filling in the charts for BMRB. He said that Bradleys store in Sheffield was the main one. I will post the e-mail from the rep (he was a South Yorkshire rep) I got below:

    As for the NME and Melody Maker charts of the 60's, in a biography of Joe Meek he had the lists of chart shops. Around 60 were in the London area alone. He would buy up 10 to 20 copies in each shop get it into the chart, then phone around DJ's saying look it's in the charts! They would do the rest.

    I should point out that hyping of this kind wasn't really necessary most of the time. Since most of the records being targeted in the 60's and early 70's were often selling anyway. For example The Small Faces - Lazy Sunday. It's not until the after 1975 that unknown records were targeted for the charts and it got more sophisticated in how it was done. Free records, gifts to store owners etc.

    Email:
    Bradleys mid to late 60's. Circles-Rotherham, Bradleys-Fargate. Think Casa Disco -Barnsley.

    How about these records being hyped back in the charts: Seven days are too long - Chuck Wood. Long Cool woman in a Black dress - Hollies. I got both copies first time around and they were finally hype into the charts 9 months after the original release dates.

    Leave a comment:


  • Robbie
    replied
    I would use 250 for BMRB. Regardless of how many shops actually contributed sales information each week to the chart the BMRB calculated sales as if 250 shops had reported sales (and continued to do so until 1997) through a weighting system of sales.

    Leave a comment:

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