Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Ultimate Averaged Chart - The BBC Chart Re-Imagined

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Originally posted by MrTibbs View Post
    the 'odd one out ' rule was only brought in at that time to keep up with the music papers and favour The Beatles
    Also enabled 'House of the rising sun' and 'The last time' to reach number one in their second week, when RR had each languishing at number 6.

    Comment


    • I'd say the BBC chart, even with its foibles, was still better (less imperfect) than RR. And the BBC chart is probably the closest of all of them to the Brian Ultimate Chart...

      Comment


      • Originally posted by RokinRobinOfLocksley View Post
        I'd say the BBC chart, even with its foibles, was still better (less imperfect) than RR. And the BBC chart is probably the closest of all of them to the Brian Ultimate Chart...
        Yeah the formula used to compile the BBC chart forms the first stage of The Ultimate Chart which corrects all the errors etc found in the original BBC chart.

        The principle behind the BBC chart was sound, no doubt about it, as the averaging process ironed out outliers and found the centre ground. It was the compilation that was haphazard. I honestly believe the BBC saw their chart as a fun chart and not to be taken too seriously. Each week was here today and gone tomorrow and never intended to be retrospectively examined.
        The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

        Comment


        • I think all the charts were compiled on an ephemeral basis. They were expected to recover their costs in the week of publication, and I doubt much consideration was given to how they would be viewed in the future.

          The charts that stand up most robustly to retrospective examination, RM and then MM, are now the least visible.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by MrTibbs View Post

            I honestly believe the BBC saw their chart as a fun chart and not to be taken too seriously. Each week was here today and gone tomorrow and never intended to be retrospectively examined.
            That's very true indeed. And since the BBC has no interest at all in these charts I think it proves your point.
            The same attitude was adopted to the performances of Top of The Pops, with nearly all the 60's shows wiped. The reason being nobody would be interested in them in years to come, especially Black and White. Of course that was before the presenter scandals. But even if they had kept the shows, the performances could have be extracted from them. In the end cost cutting wiped out loads of performances that are simply not available today.

            Education for anyone aged 12 to 16 has made a mess of the world!

            Comment


            • It is so sad, but true, that nobody had foresight to see any longer-term value in certain programmes that really were trailblazers and significant indicators of the culture of the period. Anything 'youth' or 'pop'-orientated, along with various lightweight comedy programmes, were doubtless dismissed even as they were being made by the stuffy old farts of the Beeb still exerting senior influence at that time.

              Basically, your last hopes are some obscure person's yet-to-be-unearthed private archive that's somehow lain untouched for 50+ years, or possibly good old Bob Monkhouse's private video collection! Though I suspect by now all the obvious gems from that incredibly thorough archive will've been clocked and shown, or at least incorporated into official archives for posterity.

              Comment


              • Some of the issues in the early days of TV was a reliably storage/future transmission medium. Plus, the BBC charter (I may be mistaken) was only supposed to have limited repeat programming as it was believed people would not stomach paying the licence fee to see the same stuff again. But that does go back to the old Music Hall/Theatre approach. Silent movies were junked on mass when Sound came along; Black and White TV was junked on mass when Colour came along ('People won't pay for watching a Black and White programme on a Colour TV Licence') until they found home video and the re-sale market....

                Still a shame nevertheless. More of the ITV stations (Putting on the Donegan as an example) where saved due to having to be made on film for transfer around different ITV stations.
                http://thechartbook.co.uk - for the latest are best chart book - By Decade!
                Now including NME, Record Mirror and Melody Maker from the UK and some Billboard charts

                Comment


                • Grrrrrr ! Im on my way home from hols. Been enjoying 30 degrees all week and Im told its cold and wet back in Scotland. There's a surprise !!! Not.

                  So normal service resumes tomorrow guys with the continuation of the UAC for 1956.

                  All together now 'It's Raining It's Pouring' .....
                  The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by kingofskiffle View Post
                    Some of the issues in the early days of TV was a reliably storage/future transmission medium. Plus, the BBC charter (I may be mistaken) was only supposed to have limited repeat programming as it was believed people would not stomach paying the licence fee to see the same stuff again. But that does go back to the old Music Hall/Theatre approach. Silent movies were junked on mass when Sound came along; Black and White TV was junked on mass when Colour came along ('People won't pay for watching a Black and White programme on a Colour TV Licence') until they found home video and the re-sale market....

                    Still a shame nevertheless. More of the ITV stations (Putting on the Donegan as an example) where saved due to having to be made on film for transfer around different ITV stations.
                    Most people didn't get colour TV till much later in the UK. It wasn't junked on mass! There was also a shortage of TV sets in the 1970's due to a production problem. The licence fee was much higher for a colour set too. Some people also said colour sets gave you eye strain. The first colour set I saw was at a wedding, which was held in a hotel in Sheffield. All the wedding people were watching the TV, even though it was mostly "green".
                    They were very expensive, most people rented TV sets as the broke down often, especially the colour ones. They were massive too, an 18 inch screen set had a huge back on it! Many TV engineers had back problems moving them around. Even the cost of rentals of colour were expensive. We couldn't afford one till 1976!
                    Nearly all the TV stations used Sony TV's. They were the most expensive of the lot!
                    Education for anyone aged 12 to 16 has made a mess of the world!

                    Comment


                    • Greetings Pop Pickers

                      Here is the next Ultimate Averaged Chart for Week Ending February 4th 1956

                      Here are all '' the uppers, the downers, the just hanging 'arounders '

                      The Ultimate Averaged Chart - Week Ending February 4th 1956 NME RM Total
                      Last This The Sound Survey Stores 60 52 Points
                      Week Week The Top 23 Singles Chart 20 Scored
                      1 1 Sixteen Tons - Tennessee Ernie Ford 1 1 2240
                      2 2 Ballad Of Davy Crockett - Bill Hayes 2 2 2128
                      6 3 (Love Is) The Tender Trap - Frank Sinatra 3 3 2016
                      4 4 Love And Marriage - Frank Sinatra 4 4 1904
                      3 5 Ballad Of Davy Crockett - Tennessee Ernie Ford 5 5 1792
                      7 6 Rock A Beatin' Boogie - Bill Haley and His Comets 6 6 1680
                      9 7 Rock Island Line - Lonnie Donegan 8 7 1508
                      5 8 Love Is A Many Splendoured Thing - The Four Aces 7 9 1464
                      10 9 When You Lose The One You Love - David Whitfield and Mantovani 12 8 1216
                      12 10 Robin Hood - Gary Miller 10 11 1180
                      11 11 Pickin' A Chicken - Eve Boswell 9 14 1084
                      18 12 Dreams Can Tell A Lie - Nat King Cole 11 12 1068
                      8 13 Rock Around The Clock - Bill Haley and His Comets 14 10 992
                      13 14 Only You - The Hilltoppers 15 15 672
                      17 15 Zambesi - Lou Busch 17 13 656
                      14 16 Sixteen Tons - Frankie Laine 13 19 584
                      22 17 The Shifting Whispering Sands - Eamonn Andrews 18 17 388
                      20 18 Robin Hood - Dick James 16 300
                      NEW 19 It's Almost Tomorrow - The Dream Weavers 16 260
                      NEW 20 Ain't That A Shame - Fats Domino 18 156
                      RE 21 Suddenly There's A Valley - Jo Stafford 19 120
                      NEW 22 My Boy Flat Top - Frankie Vaughan 20 60
                      23 23 With Your Love - Malcolm Vaughan 20 52
                      15 Meet Me On The Corner - Max Bygraves
                      16 The Shifting Whispering Sands - Billy Vaughan
                      21 Suddenly There's A Valley - Petula Clark
                      19 Yellow Rose Of Texas - Stan Freberg
                      The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

                      Comment


                      • Greetings Pop Pickers

                        Here is the next Ultimate Averaged Chart for Week Ending February 11th 1956

                        Here are all '' the uppers, the downers, the just hanging 'arounders '

                        The Ultimate Averaged Chart - Week Ending February 11th 1956 NME RM Total
                        Last This The Sound Survey Stores 60 52 Points
                        Week Week The Top 23 Singles Chart 20 Scored
                        1 1 Sixteen Tons - Tennessee Ernie Ford 1 1 2240
                        3 2 (Love Is) The Tender Trap - Frank Sinatra 2 2 2128
                        2 3 Ballad Of Davy Crockett - Bill Hayes 3 4 1964
                        NEW 4 Memories Are Made Of This - Dean Martin 4 3 1956
                        15 5 Zambesi - Lou Busch 7 5 1672
                        4 6 Love And Marriage - Frank Sinatra 5 10 1532
                        6 7 Rock A Beatin' Boogie - Bill Haley and His Comets 6 9 1524
                        7 8 Rock Island Line - Lonnie Donegan 9 6 1500
                        14 9 Only You - The Hilltoppers 8 8 1456
                        5 10 Ballad Of Davy Crockett - Tennessee Ernie Ford 10 6 1440
                        10 11 Robin Hood - Gary Miller 11 13 1016
                        8 12 Love Is A Many Splendoured Thing - The Four Aces 13 14 844
                        19 13 It's Almost Tomorrow - The Dream Weavers 16 11 820
                        NEW 14 Young And Foolish - Ronnie Hilton 17 12 708
                        11 15 Pickin' A Chicken - Eve Boswell 15 16 620
                        12 16 Dreams Can Tell A Lie - Nat King Cole 12 20 592
                        18 17 Robin Hood - Dick James 14 420
                        23 18 With Your Love - Malcolm Vaughan 18 17 388
                        9 19 When You Lose The One You Love - David Whitfield and Mantovani 15 312
                        16 20 Sixteen Tons - Frankie Laine 18 156
                        NEW 21 Band Of Gold - Don Cherry 19 120
                        NEW 22 Young And Foolish - Edmund Hockridge 19 104
                        22 23 My Boy Flat Top - Frankie Vaughan 20 60
                        13 Rock Around The Clock - Bill Haley and His Comets
                        17 The Shifting Whispering Sands - Eamonn Andrews
                        20 Ain't That A Shame - Fats Domino
                        21 Suddenly There's A Valley - Jo Stafford
                        The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

                        Comment


                        • 'Memories Are Made Of This', not just for Dean Martin's very high new entry, but because Don Cherry's 'Band Of Gold' also entering means a lot to me too. An uncle of mine sang this at any family parties so I became familiar with the song and I absolutely love Don Cherry's version. What a voice and What a song
                          The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

                          Comment


                          • NEW 21 Band Of Gold - Don Cherry

                            Is that the same song that Freda Payne released in September 1970?


                            23 My Boy Flat Top - Frankie Vaughan

                            Maybe that's where John Lennon got the inspiration for the beginning of Come Together.

                            Here come old flat top
                            He come grooving up slowly

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by brian05 View Post
                              NEW 21 Band Of Gold - Don Cherry

                              Is that the same song that Freda Payne released in September 1970

                              Here come old flat top
                              He come grooving up slowly
                              Hi Brian. No its an entirely different song. A fifties style ballad but an excellent one.
                              The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by brian05 View Post

                                23 My Boy Flat Top - Frankie Vaughan

                                Maybe that's where John Lennon got the inspiration for the beginning of Come Together.

                                Here come old flat top
                                He come grooving up slowly

                                As well as Chuck Berry ?!?

                                Comment


                                • Greetings Pop Pickers

                                  Here is the next Ultimate Averaged Chart for Week Ending February 18th 1956

                                  Here are all '' the uppers, the downers, the just hanging 'arounders '

                                  The Ultimate Averaged Chart - Week Ending February 18th 1956 NME RM Total
                                  Last This The Sound Survey Stores 60 52 Points
                                  Week Week The Top 22 Singles Chart 20 Scored
                                  4 1 Memories Are Made Of This - Dean Martin 1 2 2188
                                  5 2 Zambesi - Lou Busch 3 1 2120
                                  1 3 Sixteen Tons - Tennessee Ernie Ford 2 3 2076
                                  2 4 (Love Is) The Tender Trap - Frank Sinatra 4 5 1852
                                  13 5 It's Almost Tomorrow - The Dream Weavers 6 4 1784
                                  3 6 Ballad Of Davy Crockett - Bill Hayes 5 8 1636
                                  9 7 Only You - The Hilltoppers 8 6 1560
                                  6 8 Love And Marriage - Frank Sinatra 7 11 1360
                                  NEW 9 Rock And Roll Waltz - Kay Starr 9 9 1344
                                  21 10 Band Of Gold - Don Cherry 10 10 1232
                                  10 11 Ballad Of Davy Crockett - Tennessee Ernie Ford 14 7 1148
                                  8 12 Rock Island Line - Lonnie Donegan 12 12 1008
                                  NEW 13 Memories Are Made Of This - Dave King 13 13 896
                                  16 14 Dreams Can Tell A Lie - Nat King Cole 11 16 860
                                  22 15 Young And Foolish - Edmund Hockridge 17 14 604
                                  11 16 Robin Hood - Gary Miller 17 15 552
                                  7 17 Rock A Beatin' Boogie - Bill Haley and His Comets 15 19 464
                                  NEW 18 Who's Sorry Now - Johnnie Ray 19 17 328
                                  17 19 Robin Hood - Dick James 16 300
                                  RE 20 Rock Around The Clock - Bill Haley and His Comets 18 156
                                  NEW 21 Ballad Of Davy Crockett - Max Bygraves 20 60
                                  15 22 Pickin' A Chicken - Eve Boswell 20 52
                                  12 Love Is A Many Splendoured Thing - The Four Aces
                                  14 Young And Foolish - Ronnie Hilton
                                  18 With Your Love - Malcolm Vaughan
                                  19 When You Lose The One You Love - David Whitfield and Mantovani
                                  20 Sixteen Tons - Frankie Laine
                                  23 My Boy Flat Top - Frankie Vaughan
                                  The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

                                  Comment


                                  • 'Memories Are Made Of This' by Dean Martin has had a very quick climb to the top. Was it featured in a film or just very popular at the time?

                                    Comment


                                    • Originally posted by Robbie View Post
                                      'Memories Are Made Of This' by Dean Martin has had a very quick climb to the top. Was it featured in a film or just very popular at the time?
                                      It was just popular at that time, but also later on became used in many TV adverts, especially those involving cameras.
                                      Education for anyone aged 12 to 16 has made a mess of the world!

                                      Comment


                                      • Greetings Pop Pickers

                                        Here is the next Ultimate Averaged Chart for Week Ending February 25th 1956

                                        Here are all '' the uppers, the downers, the just hanging 'arounders '

                                        The Ultimate Averaged Chart - Week Ending February 25th 1956 NME RM Total
                                        Last This The Sound Survey Stores 60 52 Points
                                        Week Week The Top 24 Singles Chart 20 Scored
                                        1 1 Memories Are Made Of This - Dean Martin 1 2 2188
                                        2 2 Zambesi - Lou Busch 2 1 2180
                                        5 3 It's Almost Tomorrow - The Dream Weavers 3 3 2016
                                        4 4 (Love Is) The Tender Trap - Frank Sinatra 4 4 1904
                                        3 5 Sixteen Tons - Tennessee Ernie Ford 5 5 1792
                                        7 6 Only You - The Hilltoppers 6 6 1680
                                        9 7 Rock And Roll Waltz - Kay Starr 7 8 1516
                                        10 8 Band Of Gold - Don Cherry 8 7 1508
                                        6 9 Ballad Of Davy Crockett - Bill Hayes 9 10 1292
                                        12 10 Rock Island Line - Lonnie Donegan 11 11 1120
                                        15 11 Young And Foolish - Edmund Hockridge 12 12 1008
                                        13 12 Memories Are Made Of This - Dave King 15 9 984
                                        14 13 Dreams Can Tell A Lie - Nat King Cole 10 16 920
                                        11 14 Ballad Of Davy Crocket - Tennessee Ernie Ford 14 13 836
                                        8 15 Love And Marriage - Frank Sinatra 13 17 688
                                        17 16 Rock A Beatin' Boogie - Bill Haley and The Comets 19 15 432
                                        NEW 17 With Your Love - Robert Earl 13 416
                                        19 18 Robin Hood - Dick James 16 300
                                        18 19 Who's Sorry Now - Johnnie Ray 17 240
                                        NEW 20 In Old Lisbon - Frank Chacksfield 18 180
                                        RE 21 Ballad Of Davy Crockett - Gary Miller (A) 18 156
                                        20 22 Rock Around The Clock - Bill Haley and His Comets 19 104
                                        RE 23 Young And Foolish - Ronnie Hilton 20 60
                                        NEW 24 Young And Foolish - Dean Martin 20 52
                                        21 Ballad Of Davy Crockett - Max Bygraves
                                        22 Pickin' A Chicken - Eve Boswell
                                        16 Robin Hood - Gary Miller (B)
                                        The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

                                        Comment


                                        • 11 Young And Foolish - Edmund Hockridge
                                          23 Young And Foolish - Ronnie Hilton
                                          24 Young And Foolish - Dean Martin


                                          21 Ballad Of Davy Crockett - Gary Miller (A)
                                          ? Ballad Of Davy Crockett - Max Bygraves
                                          14 Ballad Of Davy Crocket - Tennessee Ernie Ford
                                          9 Ballad Of Davy Crockett - Bill Hayes


                                          18 Robin Hood - Dick James
                                          ? Robin Hood - Gary Miller (B)

                                          I assume these are cover versions.

                                          Comment


                                          • Originally posted by brian05 View Post
                                            11 Young And Foolish - Edmund Hockridge
                                            23 Young And Foolish - Ronnie Hilton
                                            24 Young And Foolish - Dean Martin


                                            21 Ballad Of Davy Crockett - Gary Miller (A)
                                            ? Ballad Of Davy Crockett - Max Bygraves
                                            14 Ballad Of Davy Crocket - Tennessee Ernie Ford
                                            9 Ballad Of Davy Crockett - Bill Hayes


                                            18 Robin Hood - Dick James
                                            ? Robin Hood - Gary Miller (B)

                                            I assume these are cover versions.
                                            Yeah Brian they are all just different versions of the same song.
                                            The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

                                            Comment


                                            • Very much a reflection of the era with multiple versions of songs and acts with multiple hits. If only unique songs by acts with only one charting hit were allowed on the chart there would barely be a top 10...

                                              Comment


                                              • I kind of see why Cashbox printed a list of titles in the 1940's and combined all versions. Listen to the various versions and they all sound pretty identical (okay some do change it a little) but it's not as if one is, say, Jazz and another is, say, Punk (Yes Punk is the 70's but you get what I mean!). They all sound roughly the same. Is that good? I like the change that's now starting to happen (Lonnie, Elvis, Cliff etc ) of 'writing your own stuff' .
                                                http://thechartbook.co.uk - for the latest are best chart book - By Decade!
                                                Now including NME, Record Mirror and Melody Maker from the UK and some Billboard charts

                                                Comment


                                                • Originally posted by kingofskiffle View Post
                                                  I kind of see why Cashbox printed a list of titles in the 1940's and combined all versions. Listen to the various versions and they all sound pretty identical .
                                                  I think that is where The Sheet Music Chart still played an important role at this time as it was a better indicator of each songs comparative popularity as opposed to being split into versions.
                                                  The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

                                                  Comment


                                                  • The multitude of titles all by the same artists is down to the way the industry worked at that time. Song writers took the work to Tin Pan Alley or the Brill Building in the USA and got the work published by them. It was then sent around to the Record Companies, who each had a team of A&R men (no women of course) for each label on the books. They would all listen to the songs presented to them and pick out the best. Each A&R man would assign the track to the artists on the books. The artists had to sing them of course. Few artists wrote their own material so they needed the songs to have hits. The Music Publishers would take the work around to each Record Company. Any songs from the USA would also be done like this. Generally the Labels tried to get an English artist to sing and record the US song before the one on the USA labels got issued in the UK. The largest company in the UK EMI had many labels under it's brand. Each with it's own A&R chap. Just because one A&R wanted one song for an artist, didn't stop another A&R chap selecting the same song. Nor did it stop each A&R chap picking the same song for different artists on the same label.
                                                    It was the Beatles that ended the system, but for a while they (well Lennon & McCartney) were feeding the system.
                                                    The system had two flaws. It didn't encourage groups. And in the end certain songwriters or teams held the monopoly on popular songs. I also think it didn't help instrumental hits as they are not common at all.
                                                    Education for anyone aged 12 to 16 has made a mess of the world!

                                                    Comment

                                                    Working...
                                                    X