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The Ultimate Averaged Chart - The BBC Chart Re-Imagined

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  • membranemusic
    replied
    Sorry to contribute more to the storm-in-a-teacup of Nos 21-30, but there is yet another 5th way for this particular era.
    I refer to the recent publication of RM Bubblers (C Driscoll).
    We all know that Bubblers #1-10 are not the same as Sellers #21-30.
    However if you presume that Bubbler No. 1 is RM No.21 (which it isn't, necessarily), then you get another set of contenders which in theory match up to some of the NME Nos.21-30 entries, and we cannot also ignore the droppers outside the RM Top 20...

    I have tried this out - and it's war down there! So I am not seriously suggesting this, even though there's a 2nd version of Autumn Concerto in a revised T30!

    The UAC is fine as it is.

    Leave a comment:


  • MrTibbs
    replied
    Here is the next Ultimate Averaged Chart for Week Ending October 27th 1956

    Here are all '' the uppers, the downers, the just hanging 'arounders '

    The Ultimate Averaged Chart - Week Ending October 27th 1956 NME MM RM Total
    Last This The Sound Survey Stores 65 20 60 Points
    Week Week The Top 30 Singles Chart TOP 30 Scored
    1 1 A Woman In Love - Frankie Laine 1 1 1 4350
    3 2 Hound Dog - Elvis Presley 2 3 2 4185
    2 3 Lay Down Your Arms - Anne Shelton 3 2 3 4080
    4 4 Giddy-Up-A-Ding-Dong - Freddie Bell and The Bell Boys 4 5 4 3895
    14 5 Just Walking In The Rain - Johnnie Ray 5 4 5 3790
    6 6 Rocking Through The Rye - Bill Haley and His Comets 7 6 6 3560
    5 7 Whatever Will Be Will Be - Doris Day 6 8 8 3465
    9 8 Rock Around The Clock - Bill Haley and His Comets 8 10 7 3355
    10 9 Bring A Little Water Sylvie - Lonnie Donegan (B) 11 11 2900
    11 10 When Mexico Gave Up The Rumba - Mitchell Torok 14 9 9 2865
    8 11 Ying Tong Song / Bloodnok's Rock'n'Roll Call - The Goons 12 15 10 2815
    7 12 Only You - The Platters (B) 7 15 2740
    20 13 More - Jimmy Young 11 15 13 2700
    15 14 More - Perry Como 13 12 12 2690
    16 15 Dead Or Alive - Lonnie Donegan (A) 13 17 2240
    13 16 See You Later Alligator - Bill Haley and His Comets 15 16 1940
    19 17 The Saints Rock'n'Roll - Bill Haley and His Comets 16 19 1695
    29 18 Blue Jean Bop - Gene Vincent 28 18 14 1475
    28 19 Love Me As Though There Were No Tomorrow - Nat King Cole 16 20 1195
    NEW 20 Rock With The Caveman - Tommy Steele 26 17 1165
    17 21 Razzle Dazzle - Bill Haley and His Comets 24 20 1115
    RE 22 I'm In Love Again - Fats Domino 20 18 975
    24 23 Glendora - Perry Como 18 845
    21 24 A Woman In Love - The Four Aces 19 780
    23 25 Autumn Concerto - The Melachrino Orchestra 21 650
    NEW 26 Make It A Party - Winifred Atwell 22 585
    RE 27 Heartbreak Hotel - Elvis Presley 23 520
    NEW 28 A House With Love In It - Vera Lynn 25 390
    12 29 The Great Pretender - The Platters (A) 14 340
    22 30 A Sweet Old Fashioned Girl - Teresa Brewer 17 280
    St. Theresa Of The Roses - Malcolm Vaughan 27 260
    18 Born To Be With You - The Chordettes 29 130
    27 Teach You To Rock / Short'nin Bread - Tony Crombie and His Rockets 30 65
    The Green Door - Jim Lowe 30 65
    Bring A Little Water Sylvie / Dead Or Alive - Lonnie Donegan 9
    Only You / The Great Pretender - The Platters 10
    25 Walk Hand In Hand - Tony Martin
    26 Mountain Greenery - Mel Torme
    30 I Don't Care - Liberace

    Leave a comment:


  • MrTibbs
    replied
    Here is the next Ultimate Averaged Chart for Week Ending October 20th 1956

    Here are all '' the uppers, the downers, the just hanging 'arounders '

    The Ultimate Averaged Chart - Week Ending October 20th 1956 NME MM RM Total
    Last This The Sound Survey Stores 65 20 60 Points
    Week Week The Top 30 Singles Chart TOP 30 Scored
    2 1 A Woman In Love - Frankie Laine 1 1 1 4350
    1 2 Lay Down Your Arms - Anne Shelton 2 2 2 4205
    4 3 Hound Dog - Elvis Presley 3 3 3 4060
    5 4 Giddy-Up-A-Ding-Dong - Freddie Bell and The Bell Boys 4 4 4 3915
    3 5 Whatever Will Be Will Be- Doris Day 5 5 5 3770
    8 6 Rocking Through The Rye - Bill Haley and His Comets 6 7 6 3605
    6 7 Only You - The Platters (B) 6 8 3440
    7 8 Ying Tong Song / Bloodnok's Rock'n'Roll Call - The Goons 10 8 7 3265
    9 9 Rock Around The Clock - Bill Haley and His Comets 9 9 9 3190
    10 10 Bring A Little Water Sylvie - Lonnie Donegan (B) 10 10 3045
    13 11 When Mexico Gave Up The Rumba - Mitchell Torok 11 11 11 2900
    19 12 The Great Pretender - The Platters (A) 11 12 2808
    17 13 See You Later Alligator - Bill Haley and His Comets 12 19 13 2555
    24 14 Just Walking In The Rain - Johnnie Ray 13 15 14 2510
    15 15 More - Perry Como (A) 14 16 17 2245
    14 16 Dead Or Alive - Lonnie Donegan (A) 18 15 2163
    16 17 Razzle Dazzle - Bill Haley and His Comets 15 20 16 2160
    11 18 Born To Be With You - The Chordettes 18 17 18 1905
    12 19 The Saints Rock'n'Roll - Bill Haley and His Comets 17 19 1630
    21 20 More - Jimmy Young 16 13 1335
    NEW 21 A Woman In Love - The Four Aces 21 20 1310
    18 22 A Sweet Old Fashioned Girl - Teresa Brewer 22 13 945
    NEW 23 Autumn Concerto - The Melachrino Orchestra 19 780
    27 24 Glendora - Perry Como (B) 20 715
    22 25 Walk Hand In Hand - Tony Martin 23 520
    23 26 Mountain Greenery - Mel Torme 24 455
    NEW 27 Teach You To Rock / Short'nin Bread - Tony Crombie and His Rockets 25 390
    30 28 Love Me As Though There Were No Tomorrow - Nat King Cole 26 325
    NEW 29 Blue Jean Bop - Gene Vincent 27 260
    NEW 30 I Don't Care - Liberace 28 195
    28 Ten Thousand Miles - Michael Holliday 29 130
    26 I'm In Love Again - Fats Domino 30 65
    Only You / The Great Pretender - The Platters 8
    Bring A Little Water Sylvie / Dead Or Alive - Lonnie Donegan 7
    20 Why Do Fools Fall In Love - The Teenagers
    25 Guys And Dolls (EP) - Marlon Brando and Jean Simmons
    29 Serenade - Slim Whitman

    Leave a comment:


  • MrTibbs
    replied
    Originally posted by kingofskiffle View Post
    Space in the paper? They may have felt that the charts they where doing (Top 20, British chart, Albums Top 5) and printing the weekly shop top 10's where enough.
    It's possible Lonnie but if that was the case it was not very far thinking on their past just treading water. It certainly allowed NME to get the upper hand and maybe, just maybe, if RM had been a bit braver and more innovative then it wouldn't have fallen by the wayside in 1962 sadly.

    Leave a comment:


  • kingofskiffle
    replied
    Space in the paper? They may have felt that the charts they where doing (Top 20, British chart, Albums Top 5) and printing the weekly shop top 10's where enough.

    Leave a comment:


  • MrTibbs
    replied
    What is still a bit of a mystery to me, is that by this time RM had never extended to a Top 30. Given that RM was polling around 60 shops just below NME that was more than enough for that time to easily justify a Top 30 but for some reason they stuck with a Top 20 rather than compete with NME who had moved to an extended chart back in March.

    It wouldn't have entailed much more work as the figures would already have been available to compile their Top 20 with lots of completed tallies below that still available to them. I know from my RM Early Charts 54/55 that I could compile a Top 30 from less than half that number of returns.

    Leave a comment:


  • Graham76man
    replied
    Back then also there was less reluctance on Record Companies to release new records before the old one drops out of the chart, or at least has had it's peak. By the middle 1960's Record Companies waited till a single by a current had died off before releasing the new records. Of course there were always exceptions to this "rule". But it wasn't really a rule, just a sort of belief that releasing a new single could damage the sales of the older track.
    It was even worse in the late 1940's and very early 1950's when artists had several records out in the same month, especially Bing Crosby. Mind you some of these (like Bing's) were due to some kind of contractual obligation to release records.

    Leave a comment:


  • kingofskiffle
    replied
    Originally posted by MrTibbs View Post
    Bill Haley is at the peak of his chart domination. He has 5 singles in the Top 20 including Rock Around Around The Clock climbing back into the Top10. Quite an achievement.
    Yes, very few would go on to have the same success whilst alive until you get to Ed Sheeran... but that's down to a changed music consumption path whereby anything can be accessed rather than what's in the shops and selling well, as in this case.

    Leave a comment:


  • MrTibbs
    replied
    Bill Haley is at the peak of his chart domination. He has 5 singles in the Top 20 including Rock Around Around The Clock climbing back into the Top10. Quite an achievement.

    Leave a comment:


  • MrTibbs
    replied
    Here is the next Ultimate Averaged Chart for Week Ending October 13th 1956

    Here are all '' the uppers, the downers, the just hanging 'arounders '

    The Ultimate Averaged Chart - Week Ending October 13th 1956 NME MM RM Total
    Last This The Sound Survey Stores 65 20 60 Points
    Week Week The Top 30 Singles Chart TOP 30 Scored
    1 1 Lay Down Your Arms - Anne Shelton 1 1 1 4350
    2 2 A Woman In Love - Frankie Laine 2 2 2 4205
    3 3 Whatever Will Be Will Be - Doris Day 4 4 3 3975
    4 4 Hound Dog - Elvis Presley 3 3 5 3940
    5 5 Giddy-Up-A-Ding-Dong - Freddie Bell and The Bell Boys 7 5 4 3700
    8 6 Only You - The Platters (B) 6 7 3533
    7 7 Ying Tong Song / Bloodnok's Rock'n'Roll Call - The Goons 6 10 8 3425
    6 8 Rocking Through The Rye - Bill Haley and His Comets 9 7 6 3410
    11 9 Rock Around The Clock - Bill Haley and His Comets 8 8 10 3215
    10 10 Bring A Little Water Sylvie - Lonnie Donegan (B) 10 9 3138
    12 11 Born To Be With You - The Chordettes 12 14 12 2715
    13 12 The Saints Rock'n'Roll - Bill Haley and His Comets 11 13 15 2620
    17 13 When Mexico Gave Up The Rumba - Mitchell Torok 14 9 14 2565
    14 14 Dead Or Alive - Lonnie Donegan (A) 17 13 2400
    22 15 More - Perry Como (A) 15 15 18 2140
    16 16 Razzle Dazzle - Bill Haley and His Comets 17 19 16 2050
    19 17 See You Later Alligator - Bill Haley and His Comets 20 17 1555
    20 18 A Sweet Old Fashioned Girl - Teresa Brewer 13 12 1550
    9 19 The Great Pretender - The Platters (A) 11 1200
    18 20 Why Do Fools Fall In Love - The Teenagers 23 20 1180
    26 21 More - Jimmy Young 20 15 1035
    15 22 Walk Hand In Hand - Tony Martin 16 975
    21 23 Mountain Greenery - Mel Torme 18 845
    NEW 24 Just Walking In The Rain - Johnnie Ray 19 780
    NEW 25 Guys And Dolls (EP) - Marlon Brando and Jean Simmons 19 720
    23 26 I'm In Love Again - Fats Domino 22 585
    RE 27 Glendora - Perry Como (B) 27 19 500
    NEW 28 Ten Thousand Miles - Michael Holliday 24 455
    28 29 Serenade - Slim Whitman 25 390
    29 30 Love Me As Though There Were No Tomorrow - Nat King Cole 26 325
    Autumn Concerto - The Melachrino Orchestra 30 18 325
    Race With The Devil - Gene Vincent 28 195
    Serenade - Mario Lanza 29 130
    Only You / The Great Pretender - The Platters 5
    Bring A Little Water Sylvie / Dead Or Alive - Lonnie Donegan 10
    24 A Woman In Love - Ronnie Hilton
    25 You Are My First Love - Ruby Murray
    27 Be-Bop-A-Lula - Gene Vincent
    30 Walk Hand In Hand - Jimmy Parkinson

    Leave a comment:


  • Splodj
    replied
    Robin - giving priority to records that appear in all 3 charts, as per your eye deer, is somewhat achieved in scenario (c) by reducing the unfair advantage to absentees.

    Leave a comment:


  • MrTibbs
    replied
    Here is the next Ultimate Averaged Chart for Week Ending October 6th 1956

    Here are all '' the uppers, the downers, the just hanging 'arounders '

    The Ultimate Averaged Chart - Week Ending October 6th 1956 NME MM RM Total
    Last This The Sound Survey Stores 65 20 60 Points
    Week Week The Top 30 Singles Chart TOP 30 Scored
    1 1 Lay Down Your Arms - Anne Shelton 1 1 1 4350
    6 2 A Woman In Love - Frankie Laine 3 2 2 4140
    2 3 Whatever Will Be Will be - Doris Day 2 4 3 4105
    5 4 Hound Dog - Elvis Presley 4 3 4 3935
    20 5 Giddy-Up-A-Ding-Dong - Freddie Bell and The Bell Boys 6 5 5 3705
    3 6 Rocking Through The Rye - Bill Haley and His Comets 5 6 6 3690
    4 7 Ying Tong Song / Bloodnok's Rock'n'Roll Call - The Goons 7 8 7 3460
    10 8 Only You - The Platters (B) 7 9 3295
    7 9 The Great Pretender - The Platters (A) 13 8 3073
    8 10 Bring A Little Water Sylvie - Lonnie Donegan (B) 10 11 2953
    14 11 Rock Around The Clock - Bill Haley and The Comets 12 16 10 2795
    17 12 Born To Be With You - The Chordettes 11 11 16 2600
    12 13 The Saints Rock'n'Roll - Bill Haley and His Comets 16 9 12 2555
    13 14 Dead Or Alive - Lonnie Donegan (A) 15 13 2505
    11 15 Walk Hand In Hand - Tony Martin 10 17 2205
    21 16 Razzle Dazzle - Bill Haley and The Comets 13 20 18 2170
    19 17 When Mexico Gave Up The Rumba - Mitchell Torok 19 11 15 2140
    16 18 Why Do Fools Fall In Love - The Teenagers 17 20 19 1850
    24 19 See You Later Alligator - Bill Haley and His Comets 20 14 1735
    9 20 A Sweet Old Fashioned Girl - Teresa Brewer 15 18 1300
    15 21 Mountain Greenery - Mel Torme 13 1170
    29 22 More - Perry Como (A) 18 17 1125
    22 23 I'm In Love Again - Fats Domino 24 13 815
    NEW 24 A Woman In Love - Ronnie Hilton 20 660
    RE 25 You Are My First Love - Ruby Murray 21 650
    29 26 More - Jimmy Young 22 585
    28 27 Be-Bop-A-Lula - Gene Vincent 23 520
    18 28 Serenade - Slim Whitman 27 19 500
    RE 29 Love Me As Though There Were No Tomorrow - Nat King Cole 25 390
    RE 30 Walk Hand In Hand - Jimmy Parkinson 26 325
    Ten Thousand Miles - Michael Holliday 28 195
    26 Glendora - Perry Como (B) 29 130
    Glendora - Glen Mason 30 65
    Only You / The Great Pretender - The Platters 8
    Bring A Little Water Sylvie / Dead Or Alive - Lonnie Donegan 9
    23 Heartbreak Hotel - Elvis Presley
    24 By The Fountains Of Rome - Edmund Hockridge
    27 I Want You I Need You I Love You - Elvis Presley

    Leave a comment:


  • RokinRobinOfLocksley
    replied
    Here's another thought I haven't done any research on: let's say you have 3 charts. Some records will appear on all 3, some only on 2, some only on 1. Maybe all the 3 chart records should appear on the combo chart first at the top, followed by all the 2 chart records in the middle, followed by all the 1 chart records at the bottom. Using weighted points to sort them within each category.

    Just an alternative eye deer...

    Leave a comment:


  • RokinRobinOfLocksley
    replied
    I was doing inverse points like this: For the Top 50 chart, chart position #1 = 50 inverse points, down to chart position #50 = 1 inverse point. Or, inverse points = 51 - chart position.

    For the two Top 30 charts, the same thing for chart positions #1 down to #30: #1 = 50 inverse points, down to #30 = 21 inverse points. Then awarding inverse points to the missing records at what would be positions #31 down to #50:

    a = 0 inverse points for all of them
    b = 20 inverse points for all of them
    c = 10.5 inverse points for all of them
    d = 51 - the average chart position for the charts the missing records appear on

    Something like that. It was years ago. I just pulled up my old spreadsheet, and it's got so many scenarios on it (somewhere around 50 or so), I'd be super straining my brain if I were to try and figure it out again, ha.

    Leave a comment:


  • Splodj
    replied
    Robin - I assume in (a) you are counting up as in UAC and in (b) you are counting down as in BBC. If I have misunderstood please set me right!

    Leave a comment:


  • Splodj
    replied
    I would have thought (d) is the best. I don't think it is "assuming data that does not exist", it is maximising the data that does exist. When MM was compiling a Top 50 I reckon this was very valuable data. (Not so sure about RR - particularly in the early low sample days!! - but weighting could take care of that,)

    (a) and (b) produce exactly the same results as each other when I test them.

    I think the description in (a) of "not awarding any extra points" is misleading. What matters is that you are awarding a fixed number of points (zero points) and that is the same as awarding a fixed number of points (31 points) counting the other way.

    Zero is not a neutral concept (in this context) it is a number with +1 above it and -1 below it. You can pivot the zero anywhere. Pivoting it at number 31 does not make it any more neutral than pivoting it at (say) 17. If you pivot it at 31 that means number 32 is -1 (minus one) point, number 33 is -2 points and so on. So if you found out that the real position was number 33, under the BBC system you should award 33 points and under the UAC system you should award -2 points. By awarding the default of 31 points (BBC) and 0 points (UAC) you are out by exactly the same number of points under both systems.

    Leave a comment:


  • RokinRobinOfLocksley
    replied
    For what it's worth, I did some limited research on this awhile back, something similar to combining a Top 30 chart with 2 Top 20s. Actually, I think I looked at combining a Top 50 with 2 Top 30s. Same deal.

    I tried 4 methods for the missing records #31 to #50:
    a--not awarding any extra points for the missing records
    b--using #31 for all the missing records
    c--using the average chart position #40.5 for all the missing records
    d--calculating an average of the other charts for the missing records

    Then I did the combos. I think I did a simple combo with no weighting of record shops, and then a combo with weighting of record shops.

    The end result of this limited research (if my memory is correct) is that all 4 methods were relatively close to each other, that only a few records were affected at the lower end of the combo charts. But for methods b, c, and d, you are assuming things that are not in evidence.

    b is the worst of the lot because you are adding more total points to the chart, you can't have 20 records tied at #31. A 50 position chart would normally have 1275 total inverse points, before applying record shop weightings. But a 30 position chart, with 20 records ranked at #31 would give a total of 1465 inverse points, for an extra 190 points. This throws things off, giving an advantage to those records that are missing from positions #31 to #50 on those charts.

    c and d are less bad, but still you are assuming data that does not exist.

    Philosophically speaking, 'a' is the most logical mathematical solution, you are going with only the data you have. b is not valid, and there are only minimal combo differences compared to c and d. Of course each week's charts will give different results, but overall 'a' is the way to go.

    Leave a comment:


  • Splodj
    replied
    To be fair, for most of the 'composite' period the BBC calculated 30 but broadcast only a Top 20. When we look at their Top 30s in that file it is easy to forget that the 21-30 section, which contained the bulk of such 'distortions', was only for their private use.

    Leave a comment:


  • MrTibbs
    replied
    Originally posted by Splodj View Post
    If you have NME positions 21-30 why not use them? Naturally it is imperfect because NME is only shining some light on 21-30, but surely some light is better than none!



    This is an interesting possibility. If all three charts were Top 20s it would be unfair to assume that an absentee is at number 21 - because that is the highest possible position it could be. You could do some research and determine an average position. If this were (say) 25 you could then treat an absentee as at number 25. So you would then award each absentee 25 points (BBC method) or minus 4 points (UAC) method, instead of 21 and zero respectively.

    But I don't see how applying the same score to positions 21-30 (whether 21 or 25) can be superior to applying the actual NME positions.

    Or am I missing something? (again!)
    I totally agree with you there Splodj because that is my reasoning as well. At least NME's 21 to 30 positions were factual so at least the bottom ten of the UAC is based on fact not supposition. To my mind that's the error the BBC made, assuming every record not in an individual chart be awarded points as if it were #21 or #31 which all of them couldn't be. It totally distorted, especially the lower positions, in the BBC chart.

    Leave a comment:


  • Splodj
    replied
    If you have NME positions 21-30 why not use them? Naturally it is imperfect because NME is only shining some light on 21-30, but surely some light is better than none!

    Originally posted by membranemusic View Post
    or you could choose an average points figure
    This is an interesting possibility. If all three charts were Top 20s it would be unfair to assume that an absentee is at number 21 - because that is the highest possible position it could be. You could do some research and determine an average position. If this were (say) 25 you could then treat an absentee as at number 25. So you would then award each absentee 25 points (BBC method) or minus 4 points (UAC) method, instead of 21 and zero respectively.

    But I don't see how applying the same score to positions 21-30 (whether 21 or 25) can be superior to applying the actual NME positions.

    Or am I missing something? (again!)

    Leave a comment:


  • membranemusic
    replied
    Mr Tibbs, yes I totally accept your point of view. The issue of lower figures 'invention' was a real problem when I was busy in the late 1960s doing the straight average Top 50 every week.

    With that in mind, I nonetheless had the nerve to juggle the figures for the UAC chart of 29 Sep 1956.. For those who are interested, the Platters double come in at No. 6 on jiggled joint points, and Lonnie Donegan up to No. 7. This was on my Method 2, but the same result happens with both on Method 1. Further down, Perry Como does the jiggle at No. 24 including RM compensation. But we have only 29 records ion the Top 30!

    I won't be doing this every week, promise.

    Leave a comment:


  • Splodj
    replied
    Originally posted by membranemusic View Post
    Splodj, the most egregious example of the BBC using Method 1 for double –sided hits was “The Next Time/Bachelor Boy”, which on 29th December 1962 and January 26th 1963, should have been No. 1 on the BBC chart, though fortunately it did not affect intervening weeks.

    Without doing the calcs:
    “Rock a Hula Baby/Can’t Help Falling In Love”: 3rd March 1962, 10th March 1962, 17th March 1962 - possibly more weeks at No.1 on the BBC.

    “Blue Bayou / Mean Woman Blues” - Roy Orbison: 12 Oct 1963, 19th Oct 1963, 2nd Nov 1963 , 9th November 1963 - possibly higher than No. 4 on the BBC, although there was a strong No. 3?

    However I think the UAC reflects a fair outcome in these cases.
    Yes, you are right and I am wrong. I even criticised the BBC on this thread for its 'split' methodology and said it should have used the same system it did for EPs. My memory then tricked me into thinking it had!

    Of course by the time the BBC chart came along NME was the only splitter. We cannot tell how a BBC chart would have treated the issue at this time when most were splitting. I don't think the 'highest placing' method would have been workable and suspect they too would have split.

    Leave a comment:


  • MrTibbs
    replied
    Hi membrane. Your thoughts on points below #20 is valid, the only downside being we don't have a clue what positions any record actually held below 20 on RM or MM. Originally I thought about using the same system the BBC used ie considering all records below #20 on RM and MM to be at #21 to equalise points but then took the view as it wasn't factual and as all records couldn't hold that position it would actually make the bottom ten of the UAC more a guesstimate than it already is so just went with the straight positions. As we truly have no evidence that Mitchell Torok would definitely have been in an expanded RM Top 30 it would not be fair to assume so and credit it with points (it wasn't in NME's Top 30 either) .

    Because of this I've always said that between 1955 and late 1962 when MM and Disc also moved to a Top 30 as well to take the Top 20 as factual and consider the bottom ten with a tongue in cheek approach.

    That said I sincerely appreciate you raising this valid point and hope my explanation reassures you.

    Leave a comment:


  • membranemusic
    replied
    Sorry to raise another query on the same chart 22 Sep 1956 - not a double-sided issue. This is almost trivial, but ....

    Should Mitchell Torok not be No. 28? As I see it, his record entry in MM is being under-compensated by the lack of Nos 21-30 on the RM chart. This under-compensation affects all records equally apart from those that get a placing in the other Top 20. If you give UAC nos 21-29 [all NME entries] another 600 points as though they were all joint No. 21 on RM [or you could choose an average points figure], plus Torok also, then Torok’s score is 860, enabling him to pip D Hughes in a tie break by virtue of being much higher on MM (No. 18).
    Just an opinion!

    Leave a comment:


  • membranemusic
    replied
    Splodj, the most egregious example of the BBC using Method 1 for double –sided hits was “The Next Time/Bachelor Boy”, which on 29th December 1962 and January 26th 1963, should have been No. 1 on the BBC chart, though fortunately it did not affect intervening weeks.

    Without doing the calcs:
    “Rock a Hula Baby/Can’t Help Falling In Love”: 3rd March 1962, 10th March 1962, 17th March 1962 - possibly more weeks at No.1 on the BBC.

    “Blue Bayou / Mean Woman Blues” - Roy Orbison: 12 Oct 1963, 19th Oct 1963, 2nd Nov 1963 , 9th November 1963 - possibly higher than No. 4 on the BBC, although there was a strong No. 3?

    However I think the UAC reflects a fair outcome in these cases.

    Leave a comment:

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