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The Ultimate Averaged Chart - The BBC Chart Re-Imagined

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  • Up and down chart movements are not strictly following mathematical calculations. Doing them would be better than using last week another week, but the best is in fact what Brian has done. Using the average of the charts that were compiled for the week in question is likely to give a better approximation to the real movements than an added average between the former and the next week of a chart that were never compiled.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by RokinRobinOfLocksley View Post
      A thought: I've always wondered about this. For a missing weekly chart, how accurate/reliable would it be to average together the charts a week before and a week after, and use this for the missing week, and of course document it with a note? I haven't done any number crunching, but it would be easy to do for any 3 week test period. It'd have to be better than skipping that week, or freezing the previous week. Easy to do after the fact, but not in real time for a radio show, as you of course wouldn't know what the next week's chart positions would be, ha.
      I can see Robin where that could work an an indicator for looking at a chart in its own right to see how it might have looked as a rough guide. The problem lies in that it isn't actually evidence based for the week in question along the same lines as the remaining charts and it therefore devalues any composite chart using it as factual. But it's an interesting theory worth exploring just to see how it would fit in with the affected paper's own previous week and following week chart positions in comparison with others.
      The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

      Comment


      • Interesting Kjell. One could say philosophically you should only use the true data that you have, as in this case, just average the 3 charts. However, it'd still be interesting to do a math analysis for a 3 week test period just to see what the results would look like.

        You can choose any consecutive 3 week period where you have all 4 charts NME, MM, Disc, RR. For this experiment I'll pretend the MM chart is 'missing' for week 2. So first calc a 'fake' chart for MM week 2 by averaging MM charts for weeks 1 and 3. Then average this 'fake' MM chart with the week 2 charts from NME, Disc, and RR. Then do the 3 chart average of week 2 with NME, Disc, and RR. Then do the 4 chart average of week 2 with NME, the actual MM chart, Disc, and RR.

        Which chart is closer to the actual 4 chart average for week 2: the 3 chart average, or the 4 chart average with the 'fake' MM chart?

        Of course, scientifically speaking, one would have to do this test many times over multiple 3 week periods to see if there are meaningful repetitive results.

        Interesting, fascinating, ha...

        Comment


        • So, moving forward, like I said earlier I will be giving you all the 1963 Ultimate Charts from tomorrow onwards. Having finished these I will actually now be starting to compile the 1969 charts from tomorrow.

          As we discussed a few weeks ago these are fun charts to see how these charts would have looked using the averaging process in comparison to the BMRB compilation. You will recall we had a number of conversations around proportions to be used for store returns. When we left off in February 1969 the figures were MM 250, NME 200, RR 85 but I feel these need adjusted a bit now to take account of the BMRB era.

          Taking heed of helpful and informative comments received from you I felt this process has to be proportionate and realistic for the time, assuming that it is likely there was a slight drop off in 1969 to MM and NME returns whilst not accepting BMRB achieved anything like 250 returns, well evidenced, during these early years of 1969 and 1970.

          So what I would propose is the following realistic compromise as a good balance. MM 200, NME, 150, RR 100.
          I believe these proportions allow a smooth and credible transition from the figures used in the previous weeks charts into the BMRB era and should make for an interesting and informative composite chart.

          Please feel free to comment on this should you wish to offer further thoughts on this.

          Meantime there is so much for you to look forward to in 1963. The Ultimate Chart will restore The Beatles chart positions to how they should have been recorded for posterity. The Liverpool, London, Manchester, bands will assert their authority and make the chart their own by the year end as they invade the chart in wave after wave of new and exciting music.

          Whilst not becoming redundant Elvis and Cliff's dominance will end, The Shadows will play second fiddle to Jet Harris and Tony Meehan, Helen Shapiro will vanish overnight replaced by Dusty's arrival and so many other chart regulars will never return again.

          This is my era dawning and beckoning. Open Sesame !
          The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

          Comment


          • The 200/150 proportion for MM/NME seems about right to start with.

            We have contradictory evidence about where they went down to after a while Dave says they both went to 100 and Alan 200/100. Also I note that during the postal strike 'Official' went with MM for the album charts which may be a recognition of their higher sampling. So you could bring them down to a compromise 150/100 in due course or maybe 125/100 as I feel Dave may be nearer the truth.

            I do think that BMRB should given credit for being a sales chart and I suppose starting them at 100 could be seen as favourable, but I would put them at least on a 150 par with NME to start with and progressing towards 250. Just my view.

            Comment


            • We are certainly thinking along the same lines here Splodj. I also think your point about BMRB going with MM album charts during the strike is a good one.
              It would also be my intention as you also suggest to gradually increase the BMRB poll along the way building from an initial 100, which I believe is generous to start, (as it is well documented that in the initial period it struggled to get sufficient diaries returned) towards the 250 figure by March 1971. The reverse would happen with MM and NME, whilst starting at 200/150 this would also over time reduce to around 150/100, which again ties in with Alan and Dave's figure.

              It would be interesting to hear some other views on this before I start compilation on 1969 later today.
              I'm working this morning but will post the first couple of 1963 charts this afternoon.
              The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

              Comment


              • I do think BMRB got enough sales diaries in on time in 1969 to be able to use a 100 shop figure. Personally I would have gone for a higher figure though I did suggest in an earlier post that it should be 250 from the start. In hindsight this is probably too high a figure (I believe BMRB never got 250 diaries in on time on a regular basis until after the mid 1970s though by then 200 diaries a week was achieved regularly). If we take March 1971 as the point at which the BMRB chart would be allocated a weighting of 250 then to increase it incrementally you could do something like: Feb 1969 - 100 (though personally I would have gone higher, maybe 125 or even 150), January 1970 - definitely 150 by this point, mid-1970 increase to 175, January 1971 - 200 (possibly earlier), March 1971 - 250.

                With regards to the Melody Maker album charts: my understanding is that the decision to use these during the period where a postal strike meant it wasn't possible for the BMRB to compile a chart was something that was taken by the authors of Guinness Hit Albums in the mid to late 1990s or possibly the very early 00s (it might have been when the singles and albums books were combined). The archive on the OCC website simply follows this decision.

                Comment


                • Some time ago I went and gathered scans of the charts in Music Week.

                  1969
                  5 Feb - note stating "Because of postal disruption, RR's Top 50 this week has been compiled almost exclusively by telephone with few written returns."
                  12 Feb - first BMRB chart. No indication of sample size.
                  9 Jul - first indication of sample size. Chart now has "Top 50 compiled for Record Retailer, Record Mirror, Billboard and BBC from a panel of 300 record shops by British Market Research Bureau." Of course, this does not indicate that 300 diaries are coming in on time or being used. But it is the first printed indication of a sample size.
                  20 Sep - "Records which tie for one place are listed in alphabetical order" is added to the bottom of the legend about how the chart is compiled.

                  1978
                  14 Jan - panel size legend now states "based upon 250 from a panel of 375 conventional record outlets". This is the first time this has changed since 1969. It does increase further, but stats at 250 (I think as discussed) in the early 1980's. I've not tried to find the exact date.

                  I remember, when I was researching these originally, reading an article in RR stating that BMRB hoped to increase the panel to 150 shops by July. I can't find a copy of the image now, meaning I did not take a copy. Which is annoying, but as I looked at these before the British Library allowed smart phones to photograph pages would have cost 1 to copy the page and I wanted to spend the money on the Singles and Album chart pages!

                  I'd agree with Robbie on 100 for Feb 1969. I'd suggest 150 for July, around the point the sample size went to 300.

                  Melody Maker: Complete Book in 2004 uses a frozen chart. However that years edition of British Hit Singles and Albums (The first as Robbie says to combine) used Melody Maker charts. When the OCC put the website together they would have bought data from somebody, probably Graham betts ("Based on data compiled by Graham Betts" is shown in the 2008 Virgin Hit Albums book front cover.).
                  http://thechartbook.co.uk - for the latest are best chart book - By Decade!
                  Now including NME, Record Mirror and Melody Maker from the UK and some Billboard charts

                  Comment


                  • Does no-one else think BMRB should be given an advantage for obtaining actual sales figures? This was my thinking behind starting them off at 150 rather than 100 - that on a comparative basis overall they were as good as NME but not as good as MM. Effectively introducing a second scoring criteria giving BMRB a continuous 50 bonus.

                    Comment


                    • A much better system would be to have the points based charts averaged out and leave out the sales based chart on it's own to show how the two systems compared.
                      Going past 1969 is really odd since this thread was about and quote BBC Chart Re-Imagined. After that point you are making up the rules. With talk about how many shops took part. If they got enough returns. That wasn't done for the others in the past! Brian just set the figures as set out by Alan, even when evidence suggest that certain papers extended the sample and the figures Brian was using were NOT being used at the time. Certainly after Melody Makers hype scandal in 1967, it could have been the case they increased the sample size to Brian's figure to avoid that type of thing. In fact you can see a change in the Melody Maker Charts after that, they become much slower, especially on new hits, the effect of adding more shops to the survey presumably?
                      If Brian wants to do the charts using the BMRB then he should stick with 300 shops and never adjust it. The fact that BMRB might have been a bit more open about the returns they got in has nothing to do with it. They were producing a National Chart and they would have compensated for any short falls by allotting estimated sales for shops not supplying data. Otherwise you would have a chart where records went up a down like a roller-coaster every week for the whole of the chart life.
                      I do just think that both the NME and Melody Maker were just not open about any shortfalls in data they had. Did any of them actually publish the amount of shops taking part at any time? Because I doubt it, unless they had a special report or something.

                      I do think that correcting the old BBC charts is a good thing, but to continue after 1969, when the BBC had ended the chart, is a bit of a joke! And when or if Mr Tibbs decides to run the these charts past 1969 and the end of the BBC chart, (averaging the charts out using BMRB too) then my comments on here will cease.
                      Education for anyone aged 12 to 16 has made a mess of the world!

                      Comment


                      • Melody Maker did proclaim that they had over 100 shops from 27 Aug 1960.

                        BMRB would have adapted form the data received, and I think this is where the defined universe (discussed elsewhere in the 1980's Year End sales thread) comes in of being 250 record shops.
                        http://thechartbook.co.uk - for the latest are best chart book - By Decade!
                        Now including NME, Record Mirror and Melody Maker from the UK and some Billboard charts

                        Comment


                        • I'll read up on this today, Alan's multiple articles here (updated chart history, the #1's, the individual music paper histories), and notes I've taken from Dave emails and Popscene posts. I'm mostly in favor of going with their data for number of shops.

                          With regards to BMRB and what their weighting should be, at the early stages statistically speaking one can say they still were not any better than NME or MM. Out of 6000-8000 record shops, despite wanting to report on 300 they were barely able to receive data from about 60 shops starting out per Alan. When you consider the Cable book and the math, that averaging chart positions together is still very, very close to adding up total sales, BMRB deserves no special over-consideration in the early days. Thus I wouldn't give BMRB any bonus points.

                          My encouraging of Brian to continue with this after Feb 1969 was primarily to get the various charts documented against one another week by week, not necessarily to calculate an average of them, mixing ranked charts and sales charts. That's an extra decision Brian wants to explore, and I'm OK with that. But the main thing for me is seeing the charts against each other, and I would also welcome the Top Pops/Music Now charts in this mix as well.

                          Comment


                          • The Daily Mirror observed the compilation of MM's 5-Dec-64 chart and reported that 187 returns were counted, including 40 obtained by phone. I suppose you might claim the reporter was deceived, or MM were putting on a special show, but I'd say this was a pretty good guide.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by RokinRobinOfLocksley View Post
                              My encouraging of Brian to continue with this after Feb 1969 was primarily to get the various charts documented against one another week by week
                              Even without scores the records would still need to be presented in a particular order.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by RokinRobinOfLocksley View Post


                                A thought: I've always wondered about this. For a missing weekly chart, how accurate/reliable would it be to average together the charts a week before and a week after, and use this for the missing week, and of course document it with a note? I haven't done any number crunching, but it would be easy to do for any 3 week test period. It'd have to be better than skipping that week, or freezing the previous week. Easy to do after the fact, but not in real time for a radio show, as you of course wouldn't know what the next week's chart positions would be, ha.
                                An obvious snag - how would one treat the new entries on the second chart?

                                The "averaged" missing chart could end up including records that hadn't been released at that date...

                                Comment


                                • Good point Metalweb, that thought did cross my mind too. In this case, if a new record was calculated to appear on the fake missing MM chart, you could either (a) check the other charts NME Disc RR to see if it appeared on them that week as well, or (b) check the release date of the record in question. Not perfect, but reasonable. In doing this type of thing, we won't be getting 100% accurate results, we're just trying to get the best approximation we can with the data we have available...

                                  Comment


                                  • Thanks guys, lots of interesting stuff there.

                                    I don't agree though that you can't mix point based charts with a sales chart as they both come down to allocating chart positions from data at the end of the day and it is these chart positions that are used for averaging out.

                                    The 250 figure was not reached according to Dave until March 1971. He claimed that after the postal strike W. H. Smith and Boots came on board thus allowing for the 250 figure so I would assume that prior to this the returns were only increasing incrementally.
                                    Your comments also seem to support incremental increases towards this figure. So let's go with 200/150/100 for starters, Then in July 69, 200/150/125, in January 70, 200/150/150, July 70, 200/150/175, January 71, 200/150/200. this then factors in nicely with BMRB going to 250 when Boots and Smiths join in March 71. I believe also at that point that is when the NME and MM influence waned and their charts were cut back as Dave and Alan advised.

                                    I did take a look at Top Pops with a view to including it, but decided against this (and I know it's a disappointment to Robin) for the following reasons. It was a short lived chart, its sample was smaller than what RR originally used as it was based solely on W. H. Smith stores, and finally when I looked at it in detail some of it's positions are way off in comparison to the other three, so it would bring nothing to the table.

                                    I need to stress again though that the averaging process continuing into the BMRB era is purely for 'fun' to provide an insight into how this would have looked had an averaged chart continued, whilst as Robin says providing an opportunity to see the charts lined up against each other. I'm still pretty certain there is no other publication that does this and that display of this information here is a first.

                                    That lets me get to work on this now.

                                    But, for the moment 1963 beckons so let's get to it
                                    The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

                                    Comment


                                    • Greetings Pop Pickers !

                                      Here is the next Ultimate Averaged Chart for Week Ending January 5th 1963

                                      The Ultimate Averaged Chart - Week Ending January 5th 1963 NME MM DISC RR Total
                                      Last This The Sound Survey Stores 100 150 50 30 Points
                                      Week Week The Top 30 Singles Chart BBC TOP 30 Scored
                                      1 1 The Next Time / Bachelor Boy - Cliff Richard 1 3 1 1 1 9700
                                      2 2 Return To Sender - Elvis Presley 2 2 2 2 2 9570
                                      3 3 Dance On - The Shadows 3 1 3 3 7 9320
                                      4 4 Sun Arise - Rolf Harris 4 4 4 4 4 8910
                                      6 5 (Dance With The) Guitar Man - Duane Eddy 5 5 5 6 5 8530
                                      5 6 Lovesick Blues / She Taught Me How To Yodel - Frank Ifield 6 7 6 5 3 8290
                                      9 7 Bobby's Girl - Susan Maughan 7 8 8 8 6 7650
                                      10 8 It Only Took A Minute - Joe Brown 8 9 10 7 8 7240
                                      11 9 Telstar - The Tornados 11 9 7 18 9 7110
                                      8 10 Let's Dance - Chris Montez 9 11 9 10 10 6980
                                      12 11 The Swiss Maid - Del Shannon 10 17 11 12 11 5950
                                      15 12 Desafinado - Stan Getz and Charlie Byrd 12 12 14 12 18 5790
                                      18 13 Go Away Little Girl - Mark Wynter 13 13 19 9 17 5120
                                      7 14 Rockin' Around The Christmas Tree - Brenda Lee 15 22 12 16 12 5070
                                      21 15 Like I Do - Maureen Evans 17 14 16 17 19 5010
                                      16 16 Up On The Roof - Kenny Lynch 14 16 18 11 14 4960
                                      22 17 A Forever Kind Of Love - Bobby Vee 18 18 13 26 13 4790
                                      14 18 Your Cheating Heart - Ray Charles 16 14 20 14 15 4680
                                      13 19 The Main Attraction - Pat Boone 19 23 15 20 20 4080
                                      20 20 Devil Woman - Marty Robbins 21 28 17 22 16 3300
                                      19 21 Me And My Shadow - Frank Sinatra and Sammy Davis Jnr. 20 19 28 15 21 2750
                                      17 22 Must Be Madison - Joe Loss 22 25 23 19 23 2640
                                      23 23 Baby Take A Bow - Adam Faith 23 21 24 30 22 2370
                                      28 24 Love Me Do - The Beatles 25 21 24 1710
                                      25 25 Sherry - The Four Seasons 24 22 27 27 1670
                                      30 26 Up On The Roof - Julie Grant 20 21 1600
                                      NEW 27 He's A Rebel - The Crystals 26 29 27 24 30 1180
                                      26 28 Don't You Think It's Time - Mike Berry 24 23 1100
                                      NEW 29 Can Can '62 - Peter Jay and The Jaywalkers 29= 25 900
                                      RE 30 Venus In Blue Jeans - Mark Wynter 26 750
                                      Bachelor Boy - Cliff Richard 5
                                      B Comin' Home Baby - Mel Torme 26 500
                                      24 Island Of Dreams - The Springfields 27 30 28 26 450
                                      B Just For Kicks - Mike Sarne 29= 27 400
                                      Love Me Tender - Richard Chamberlain 29= 29 28 390
                                      B The Alley Cat Song - David Thorne 25 300
                                      27 Gossip Calypso - Bernard Cribbins 28 25 180
                                      29 We're Gonna Go Fishin' - Hank Locklin 30 29 160
                                      X Go Away Little Girl - Ray Bennett 29 100
                                      The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

                                      Comment


                                      • It’s difficult to compare sales and rankings. The problem with sales figures is if you take a selection of shops that differs from the average when it comes to different segments of music thus preferring music tastes which are not in line with the main body of buyers. I remember 77 november 26 when both NME and MM both had Rockin’ all over the World by Status Quo at number one, and as I remember even Music Week published sales figures that confirmed the summit position, but on MWs chart page the record was only at 3.

                                        Comment


                                        • Originally posted by kingofskiffle View Post
                                          Melody Maker did proclaim that they had over 100 shops from 27 Aug 1960.

                                          BMRB would have adapted form the data received, and I think this is where the defined universe (discussed elsewhere in the 1980's Year End sales thread) comes in of being 250 record shops.
                                          But doesn't mean they had 100 shops taking part every week. No survey could guarantee a full compliment of shops each week. The only way you could ensure a set figure is to gather information from more shops than you actually need. So if you required 100 shops you would need at least about 150 sending them in.
                                          As I understand it the BMRB "defined universe" included accounting for shops that were not registered with the BMRB. And was also based on the turnover of each shop. None of the point based ever took into size of shop or sales.

                                          Also Mr Tibbs statements about the early years of the BMRB are false. I have monitored the 1970 charts, while doing the Real Chart and apart from the fact they only have 300 shops and no Woolies. The BMRB chart is very close at times. Whereas the NME and Melody Maker are off by miles and do not have the same response that BMRB has after a record appears on TOTP. Nine times out of Ten NME and MM will have the record lower down or even falling after TOTP. But BMRB chart does not.
                                          BMRB chart fails badly in 1976, due to fact it uses the wrong week, making TOTP records go up and down and is slower at changing the number one record.
                                          Education for anyone aged 12 to 16 has made a mess of the world!

                                          Comment


                                          • ^
                                            From observation, the chart sales week for NME and MM shops changes in the early 70s. It looks like the Saturday week ending sales week changes to a Friday at the very least. So that's fewer chart shops for those two charts as well as an earlier cut off. That would explain the lack of a TOTP effect on those charts.

                                            Comment


                                            • Graham76man
                                              Graham76man commented
                                              Editing a comment
                                              I was talking about the 1970 chart only!

                                          • Originally posted by Robbie View Post
                                            ^
                                            From observation, the chart sales week for NME and MM shops changes in the early 70s. It looks like the Saturday week ending sales week changes to a Friday at the very least. So that's fewer chart shops for those two charts as well as an earlier cut off. That would explain the lack of a TOTP effect on those charts.
                                            Yeah I agree Robbie, I think March 1971 was the watershed year and month for them. After the postal strike when Boots and Smiths came on board the BMRB chart was finally accepted as THE chart and their charts began to diminish both in store returns and influence.
                                            The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

                                            Comment


                                            • Graham76man
                                              Graham76man commented
                                              Editing a comment
                                              Boots and Smiths were not on board the BMRB chart, they were not on even in 1976.

                                          • 1 The Next Time / Bachelor Boy - Cliff Richard

                                            So Cliff at nos. 3 and 5 meant he was not no. 1 in NME chart.

                                            But the Shadows were no. 1 in NME although they fell from no. 3 to no. 7 in RR chart. Strange.

                                            Wonder what the actual sales figures for Cliff, Elvis and The Shadows were. Guess we'll never know.

                                            Comment


                                            • The Shadows chart pattern is a strange one on RR, it drops from 3 to 7 the week above, then goes back to 3 , 2, 1, . But then I gave up a long time ago trying to work out the RR chart lol.
                                              The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

                                              Comment


                                              • Greetings Pop Pickers !

                                                Here is the next Ultimate Averaged Chart for Week Ending January 12th 1963

                                                The Ultimate Averaged Chart - Week Ending January 12th 1963 NME MM DISC RR Total
                                                Last This The Sound Survey Stores 100 150 50 30 Points
                                                Week Week The Top 30 Singles Chart BBC TOP 30 Scored
                                                1 1 The Next Time / Bachelor Boy - Cliff Richard 1 3 1 1 1 9700
                                                2 2 Return To Sender - Elvis Presley 2= 2 2 3 2 9520
                                                3 3 Dance On - The Shadows 2= 1 3 2 3 9490
                                                5 4 (Dance With The) Guitar Man - Duane Eddy 4 5 4 5 4 8760
                                                4 5 Sun Arise - Rolf Harris 5 7 5 4 7 8370
                                                6 6 Lovesick Blues / She Taught Me How To Yodel - Frank Ifield 6 6 6 6 5 8280
                                                8 7 It Only Took A Minute - Joe Brown 7 9 7 9 6 7650
                                                13 8 Go Away Little Girl - Mark Wynter 8 10 11 7 8 6990
                                                9 9 Telstar - The Tornados 12 8 8 21 11 6850
                                                7 10 Bobby's Girl - Susan Maughan 9 12 10 12 9 6660
                                                15 11 Like I Do - Maureen Evans 10 11 12 11 10 6480
                                                10 12 Let's Dance - Chris Montez 13 14 9 13 13 6440
                                                16 13 Up On The Roof - Kenny Lynch 11 12 13 8 12 6320
                                                12 14 Desafinado - Stan Getz and Charlie Byrd 14 17 15 17 15 4980
                                                11 15 The Swiss Maid - Del Shannon 16 21 14 20 14 4610
                                                18 16 Your Cheating Heart - Ray Charles 15 19 18 15 16 4400
                                                17 17 A Forever Kind Of Love - Bobby Vee 19 23 16 26 18 3690
                                                28 18 Don't You Think It's Time - Mike Berry 17 18 23 14 21 3650
                                                19 19 The Main Attraction - Pat Boone 21 24 17 25 20 3430
                                                NEW 20 Globetrotter - The Tornados 18 15 27 10 28 3340
                                                27 21 He's A Rebel - The Crystals 20 25 20 22 19 3060
                                                21 22 Me And My Shadow - Frank Sinata and Sammy Davis Jnr. 23 22 26 18 23 2540
                                                NEW 23 Comin' Home Baby - Mel Torme 22 16 16 24 2460
                                                24 24 Love Me Do - The Beatles 24 21 17 1920
                                                23 25 Baby Take A Bow - Adam Faith 30 19 29 1860
                                                20 26 Devil Woman - Marty Robbins 28 22 30 25 1580
                                                22 27 Must Be Madison - Joe Loss 25= 29 25 24 27 1570
                                                NEW 28 Diamonds - Jet Harris and Tony Meehan 25= 20 23 1500
                                                RE 29 Island Of Dreams - The Springfields 29 24 28 26 1350
                                                26 30 Up On The Roof - Julie Grant 27 25 19 1200
                                                Bachelor Boy - Cliff Richard 4
                                                29 Can Can '62 - Peter Jay and The Jaywalkers 28 450
                                                X Ruby Ann - Marty Robbins 27 400
                                                B The Lonely Bull - The Tijuana Brass 29 22 370
                                                B Charmaine - The Bachelors 28 300
                                                14 Rockin' Around The Christmas Tree - Brenda Lee 29 300
                                                B Just For Kicks - Mike Sarne 30 30 250
                                                B The Alley Cat Song - David Thorne 27 200
                                                We're Gonna Go Fishin' - Hank Locklin 30 100
                                                Keep Your Hands Off My Baby - Little Eva 30 30
                                                25 Sherry - The Four Seasons
                                                30 Venus In Blue Jeans - Mark Wynter
                                                * The Disc chart printed on UK Mix has an error. #20 should be The Lonely Bull by The Tijuana Brass, not, Island Of Dreams.
                                                The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

                                                Comment

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