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  • The end of Google Play

    Google Play Music is going away soon
    YouTube Music is replacing Google Play Music as your new destination for music listening and discovery. Between October and the end of this year, access to Google Play Music will be removed permanently. We know that you've spent time building your Google Play Music library, so we've made it easy to transfer your music library to YouTube Music with just one click, including playlists, uploads and recommendations.

    If you haven't tried YouTube Music yet, you'll notice that it looks a bit different from Google Play Music, but know that it was built by the same team with the same passion. It also offers more than 65 million official songs, albums and playlists, as well as many features that you love and expect from Google Play Music.

    Music store on Google Play
    Starting in 30 days, the Music store on Google Play will go away. It will no longer be possible to purchase music on Google Play, and all pre-orders will be cancelled. When you transfer, your purchases will move with you to YouTube Music.

    Will anyone miss it? Beatles albums are only 8.99 on Google Music, 3 cheaper than iTunes downloads.
    Looks like streaming is taking over. So how long before iTunes disappears?

  • #2
    I only ever used it to play mp3's. So I won't miss it as I never viewed it as a store.
    I have received many gifts from God,
    but this is the first time I have ever received a gift from a goddess
    .

    Don McLean on Madonna's version of American Pie

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    • #3
      Me too. lol
      jio CHARTS NOW: 21/9/2020: https://www.ukmix.org/forum/chart-di...3#post10468623

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      • #4
        I never used it for buying or streaming, but it does revive the quiet debate that's been ongoing for the last few years as to when major online download stores will be closed in favour of their streaming-only counterparts. Sadly, as people move so keenly to renting digital listens over buying digital product, sales have collapsed to historically low levels and continue to decline, seemingly now destined to become a mere niche footnote to the commercial music sector. There surely must come a point where the large players determine that it is not worth bothering with their download store and so will pull it; many predicted that point would've come by 2020, but so far so good as most big online stores remain open for paid-for purchases of songs and albums. I suppose the game-changer will be the withdrawal of Apple's iTunes, which I assume even in a much-reduced sales sector still commands the lion's share, albeit perhaps with Amazon coming a closer second than in its 2000s heyday of almost complete dominance. Whenever that time comes, it will stage a notable killing-off of what little sales are made now, as it will force many who prefer buying to embrace streaming, like it or not.

        Personally I hope some lesser stores will continue offering downloads; nobody completely gave up on vinyl when it was at its nadir, and the CD will likely always remain a niche format at least in the albums market, so let's hope that the virtual equivalent won't die a complete death either. What I do expect will start happening though as we move into the 2020s will be the emergence of a strategy of only releasing new tracks for streaming. I would surmise that once the big players in downloads die-off, that will become more prevalent as although it's hardly expensive to market a download, why bother if there's too small a market for it? As that beds-in, our charts will become more-or-less a streaming-only chart, with sales only providing a few thousand units each week. It will frustrating for the likes of me as if I like a single enough I am happy to buy it - 99p is cheap for a good song really and one can listen back at any time without paying a continued subscription. It'll be like the late '00s when some singles I wanted started not to be released on CD, which forced me into downloading. But at least that was still a form of sale. Such a shame - tech gives much with one hand but also takes back with the other.

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        • #5
          Gambo while vinyl was somewhat available in the late 90's/early 00's it was mostly indie stuff. Major mainstream artist were releasing mostly on CD's. That why a lot of the releaees from that time are now first edition. So technically it was kind of dead at one point.
          I have received many gifts from God,
          but this is the first time I have ever received a gift from a goddess
          .

          Don McLean on Madonna's version of American Pie

          Comment


          • #6
            I did actually buy stuff from the google store as it was usually cheaper than Amazon and ITunes doesn't let me buy stuff for some reason (I end up in a neverending loop of being asked for my password and verifying my billing info).

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            • #7
              I am not surprised. Google are getting worse at chopping things and altering things. For example Google image search was fantastic at one time, now it's rubbish. YouTube is being slowly taken over by multi-national broadcasters with big budgets. Anything controversial and user based sidelined. With many people reporting notifications missing. All Google doing of course.
              Education for anyone aged 12 to 16 has made a mess of the world!

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              • #8
                After typing that I decided to give ITunes another go and bizarrely it accepted the verification of the billing info and I was able to make a purchase!!

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                • #9
                  Not all genres stream well - typically rock is primarily sales (CD or digital) - so removing the ability to buy will probably have a disastrous effect on rock and many other genres. Also Taylor Swift had greater sales than streams in the US and I believe in the UK at least the first week - though preorders for the CD may have been the greater proportion than downloads. I prefer to own rather than rent my music, but i guess that opinion is unfortunately now a minority.

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                  • #10
                    Rock - and guitar-driven music in general - performed fairly poorly in making the transition in sales from physical to digital in the 2000s; alas it certainly has fared even worse in the wholesale shift from sales to streaming. The 2010s saw very few guitar-led songs do well in the charts, particularly in the streams-driven latter half of the decade. One has to suspect this is primarily to do with the more traditional way in which a majority of rock enthusiasts prefer to consume their music - physical first, digital second, streaming a very poor third. Other genres have similarly failed to make these key transitions from one format to another, and lately one method of consumption to another.

                    But is this under-representation in commercial terms by a genre that overall still has strong fanbases and an ardent global following just a by-product of the way its listeners prefer to consume their favourite music, or is it that what sales and streams it does accrue are increasingly being sidelined and eclipsed by other genres which, for whatever reason, seem to be favoured not just by consumers, but also by streaming site administrators too? Like it or not there is apparently a huge market for 'urban' (sorry; we're told not to use that catch-all term anymore but it's handy here) acts' prolific if formulaic output, particularly in the streaming sector, but is part of that a function of the likes of Spotify et al determining that these are the acts they want to support and so flood their pre-curated playlists with (which then get listened-to passively by thousands of lazy streamers and then clock-up vast 'chart sales')? I suppose it's a chicken and egg question really. But the excessive dominance by one group of genres, whether one approves of them or not, surely cannot be a positive feature in our charts. There used to be room for so much more diversity in the sales-led era it seems.

                    The demise of Google Play and eventually most other digital download stores will presumably only serve to hammer this already uncomfortable narrow domination home.

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