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1970s / 1980s / 1990s UK Year End Charts (Channel 5)

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  • MFR
    replied
    They didn't tell the world. They told the BMRB. The BMRB then added it all together and gave the industry the total panel sales for each record, week, quarter, year etc.

    The BMRB just published the panel sales. They didn't multiply the figures up.

    But by the end of 1975 an exercise was underway which tracked sales through the whole system, from ordering and manufacture to over-the-counter sales and returns. From this came the multiplier, which represents the relationship between the panel and the whole market.

    For singles the figure derived from this was 17, i.e. it had been established that one in seventeen singles sold to a customer was sold within the panel.

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  • Graham76man
    replied
    Originally posted by MFR View Post

    Yes, of course parts of the market not included in the sample were taken account of when deciding by what value panel sales should be multiplied up in order to reflect the whole market. This continued until 1997 when defined universe sales were first reported, and these were not quite the whole market, but around 99% .
    At what point did the BMRB start using the multiplier to calculate the sales? Was it used from the start of the MMRB chart in 1969? Until 1975 Woolworth's were not sending any information to the BMRB, so how can you calculate what they did not know from that.

    Of course I can see now that the BMRB were not just using the 300 shops in the survey from the 1975 figures. Because there is a drop in the sales of number 50 compared to 1974. And that would not have been the case, since in 1975 most people were buying records from the Woolies. And if the BMRB chart sampled them correctly the 50 would have shown an increase in sales.

    But of course you wouldn't expect profit making companies to tell the world about the level of sales, especially at a time when tax levels were that high that many stars left the UK to live abroad just to avoid the crippling tax payments. And rich people always pay their tax bills right!

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  • Splodj
    replied
    I wonder why there are two figures for 3, 4 & 5.

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  • brian05
    replied
    ^ Sorry, I misunderstood.

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  • Robbie
    replied
    ^
    Yes they are on the version of the page I linked to. But they aren't on the current version of the page!

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  • brian05
    replied
    Originally posted by Robbie View Post
    I can't see them on the current version of the page https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1975_i...elling_singles

    Singles
    1. "Bye Bye Baby" - Bay City Rollers 714,000
    2. "Sailing" - Rod Stewart 561,000
    3. "Can't Give You Anything (But My Love)" - The Stylistics 552,500 525,000
    4. "Whispering Grass" - Windsor Davies & Don Estelle 552,000 549,000
    5. "Stand By Your Man" - Tammy Wynette 527,000 497,000
    6. "Give a Little Love" - Bay City Rollers 490,000
    7. "Hold Me Close" - David Essex 489,000
    8. "The Last Farewell" - Roger Whittaker 477,000
    9. "I Only Have Eyes for You" - Art Garfunkel 476,000
    10. "Tears On My Pillow" - Johnny Nash 473,000
    11. "I'm Not In Love" - 10cc 472,000
    12. "Barbados" - Typically Tropical 470,000
    13. "If" - Telly Savalas 445,000
    14. "There Goes My First Love" - The Drifters 439,000
    15. "Three Steps to Heaven" - Showaddywaddy 430,000
    16. "The Hustle" - Van McCoy 429,000
    17. "Space Oddity" - David Bowie 429,000
    18. "January" - Pilot 428,000
    19. "Funky Moped / The Magic Roundabout" - Jasper Carrott 427,000
    20. "Make Me Smile (Come Up and See Me)" - Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel 426,000
    21. "Oh Boy" - Mud 425,000
    22. "Bohemian Rhapsody" - Queen 420,000
    23. "Misty" - Ray Stevens 419,000
    24. "Lovin' You" - Minnie Riperton 411,000
    25. "The Way We Were/Try to Remember" - Gladys Knight & the Pips 350,000
    26. "Sugar Candy Kisses" - Mac and Katie Kissoon 349,000
    27. "There's a Whole Lot of Loving" - Guys 'n' Dolls 348,000
    28. "Please Mr. Postman" - The Carpenters 340,000
    29. "Sing Baby Sing" - The Stylistics 322,000
    30. "Love Is the Drug" - Roxy Music 320,000
    31. "Rhinestone Cowboy" - Glen Campbell 319,000
    32. "Moonlighting" - Leo Sayer 318,000
    33. "D.I.V.O.R.C.E." - Billy Connolly 314,000
    34. "Hurts so Good" - Susan Cadogan 310,000
    35. "Only You Can" - Fox 309,000
    36. "Honey" - Bobby Goldsboro 308,000
    37. "Fox on the Run" - Sweet 307,000
    38. "Blanket on the Ground" - Billie Jo Spears 305,000
    39. "It's Been So Long" - George McCrae 304,000
    40. "Scotch on the Rocks" - Band of the Black Watch 303,000
    41. "You Sexy Thing" - Hot Chocolate 302,000
    42. "Feelings" - Morris Albert 301,000
    43. "The Secrets That You Keep" - Mud 300,000
    44. "If You Think You Know How to Love Me" - Smokie 299,000
    45. "The Bump" - Kenny 295,000
    46. "I’m on Fire" - 5000 Volts 294,000
    47. "Love Me Love My Dog" - Peter Shelley 293,000
    48. "SOS" - ABBA 281,000
    49. "That's the Way (I Like It)" - KC & The Sunshine Band 280,000
    50. "Disco Stomp" - Hamilton Bohannon 279,000
    Last edited by brian05; Sun October 24, 2021, 21:30.

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  • MFR
    replied
    Originally posted by Robbie View Post
    ^
    Singles sales were at a low point in the early 1970s. The older generation and a whole new generation of rock music fans were buying albums, sales of which reached new levels in the same period. In addition a large amount of younger music fans were buying (or having bought for them) those cover version Top Of The Pops and Hits albums and later TV advertised chart compilation albums from the likes of K-Tel and Ronco which became very popular from the early 70s onwards.

    The sales given in the year end charts are total estimated sales for the UK as a whole and not just sales in a 300 shop panel.
    Yes, of course parts of the market not included in the sample were taken account of when deciding by what value panel sales should be multiplied up in order to reflect the whole market. This continued until 1997 when defined universe sales were first reported, and these were not quite the whole market, but around 99% .

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  • Robbie
    replied
    Originally posted by rubcale View Post

    The sales for the top 50 of 1975 have survived
    I can't see them on the current version of the page https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1975_i...elling_singles

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  • rubcale
    replied
    Originally posted by Robbie View Post
    The person who added the sales figures for 1971 also did the same for 1972, 1973, 1974 and 1975. The sales for those years were subsequently deleted but the ones for 1971 appear to have survived (despite apparently being deleted twice).

    1975 https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php...ldid=557352722

    The above are old revisions of each page, all dated from 28 May 2013 and all sales were subsequently removed in further revisions as they were marked by other page editors as unverified (and are most likely estimates).
    The sales for the top 50 of 1975 have survived

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  • Graham76man
    commented on 's reply
    You will believe anything Robbie!

  • Robbie
    replied
    ^
    Singles sales were at a low point in the early 1970s. The older generation and a whole new generation of rock music fans were buying albums, sales of which reached new levels in the same period. In addition a large amount of younger music fans were buying (or having bought for them) those cover version Top Of The Pops and Hits albums and later TV advertised chart compilation albums from the likes of K-Tel and Ronco which became very popular from the early 70s onwards.

    The sales given in the year end charts are total estimated sales for the UK as a whole and not just sales in a 300 shop panel.

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  • Graham76man
    replied
    Looking at those sales they are very low, considering home taping was not common in the early to middle 70's. I think that they must have been only based on the 300 shops that supplied BMRB. I bet you could double those figures if you added in the sales from Woolworths alone. I have a list from 1972 of ALL the stores and it has 1,132 branches. Of course not all stores sold records, but even so if 600 store sold 600 copies each that's an extra 360,000 to the total to each record.

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  • Robbie
    replied
    Originally posted by Splodj View Post
    But they have applied new information for the year-end Album Charts to create revised positions shown in the Wiki entries.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1970_in_British_music

    Regarding singles, the 1971 Wiki entry is very impressive with what appears to be sales figures beside each in the Top 50.

    Then in 1972 Wiki falls back to just a Top 20. Was there a problem that year? I seem to recall POTP reverted to a Top 3s show rather than a chart of the year.
    The person who added the sales figures for 1971 also did the same for 1972, 1973, 1974 and 1975. The sales for those years were subsequently deleted but the ones for 1971 appear to have survived (despite apparently being deleted twice).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Specia...90.194.133.119

    1972 https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php...ldid=557189888

    1973 https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php...ldid=557196641

    1974 https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php...ldid=557200535

    1975 https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php...ldid=557352722

    The above are old revisions of each page, all dated from 28 May 2013 and all sales were subsequently removed in further revisions as they were marked by other page editors as unverified (and are most likely estimates).

    Leave a comment:


  • Splodj
    replied
    With regard to why RM didn't publish the BMRB year-end chart, we never got to the bottom of that. Is it possible that, in the Billboard contract with BMRB, RM's publication rights were restricted to the weekly charts?

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  • Splodj
    replied
    Originally posted by fiesta View Post
    Why was the year end chart for 1970 printed in Tony Jasper's Top Twenty Book, (which I presume was taken from Record Mirror) different to the above one in Record Retailer?
    We were discussing this on the other thread and it appears that the Tony Jasper year-end chart is not the same as the point-based year-end chart in Record Mirror.

    https://www.ukmix.org/forum/chart-di...0#post10685320

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  • Robbie
    replied
    Originally posted by Blondini View Post

    that seems clear now but it wasn't before. So there's nothing really to talk about in chart terms. Unless they revise the late 70s?
    I'm curious about what version of the year end charts will be used for 1977 and 1978 as revised charts were compiled and later published in Music Week. The revised 1977 chart has a different number 1.

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  • fiesta
    replied
    Why was the year end chart for 1970 printed in Tony Jasper's Top Twenty Book, (which I presume was taken from Record Mirror) different to the above one in Record Retailer?

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  • JayCrawford1964
    replied
    Is weird that the UK (not this forum) has this obsession with 90s music, that era was garbage

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  • Splodj
    replied
    But they have applied new information for the year-end Album Charts to create revised positions shown in the Wiki entries.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1970_in_British_music

    Regarding singles, the 1971 Wiki entry is very impressive with what appears to be sales figures beside each in the Top 50.

    Then in 1972 Wiki falls back to just a Top 20. Was there a problem that year? I seem to recall POTP reverted to a Top 3s show rather than a chart of the year.

    Leave a comment:


  • kingofskiffle
    replied
    I'd imagine that very few locations would have access to any data to allow the OCC to go back and re-compile or amend the 1970 chart. Possible the BBC Written Archive would have original weekly sales sheets as used on Radio 1 - they are notorious for keeping paperwork! - but I would find it hard to believe the OCC would go back and amend those. I can see why they might for the 1980's/1990's, to adjust multipliers etc. but I can't see any reason for them to recompile. From 1973 onwards weekly charts survive in the BPI Library (as was) so the OCC could (but probably won't) go back and recompile those to make them reflect a full year, amend errors, etc. I think they will not.

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  • Blondini
    replied
    Originally posted by Robbie View Post
    The OCC didn't compile the chart, unlike those of the 1980s and 1990s that were featured earlier in the year. The chart is the same as in kingofskiffle's post above, it's the top 30 that was compiled by BMRB at the time.
    that seems clear now but it wasn't before. So there's nothing really to talk about in chart terms. Unless they revise the late 70s?

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  • Robbie
    replied
    Originally posted by Blondini View Post
    OCC seem to have forgotten to post an article.

    Has anyone made a note of the broadcast chart? I'm just about to watch it now.
    The OCC didn't compile the chart, unlike those of the 1980s and 1990s that were featured earlier in the year. The chart is the same as in kingofskiffle's post above, it's the top 30 that was compiled by BMRB at the time.

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  • Blondini
    replied
    It looks like it's the same chart as the one in history - posted above and below on Wikipedia. Otherwise Two Little Boys - which they skipped past - would be higher? Also Dave Edmunds would be much higher?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1970_in_British_music

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  • kingofskiffle
    replied
    The Music Week chart for 26 Dec 1970 was the Year End chart, and I thought I’d post a link to that scan here.
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/8y4njn3ogn...ingle.pdf?dl=0

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  • Graham76man
    replied
    When it came to Yellow River there was no mention of British Telecom's advert for Yellow Pages!
    Somebody needs to tell Paul that Joni Mitchell is still alive!!!

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