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THE UK SHEET MUSIC CHARTS - Week By Week From December 1939

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  • THE UK SHEET MUSIC CHARTS - Week By Week From December 1939

    The First UK Music Charts From The Very Beginning ..

    On my other chart thread The Ultimate Averaged Charts recent comments were made which indicated some interest in what music and songs were being listened to prior to the first NME record chart on 14th November 1952.

    Long before this, sales of sheet music far exceeded record sales in the UK as more homes had pianos that record players so the chart compiled from sales of sheet music was a better indication back then as to the most popular music back in these early years of charted music.

    Indeed it was The Sheet Music Top 20 that Radio Luxembourg aired on their famed Top 20 show broadcast at 11pm every Sunday night right up until the end of December 1959.

    So here are those early charts which tragically nowadays are all but forgotten with the passing of time. Sadly we are not proud of our musical heritage which has whitewashed out of existence. The UK radio stations and music publications would have us believe nothing existed prior to November 1952 and the 1950's and early sixties are almost now non existent too as far as they are concerned. We are losing past musical culture as though we are ashamed of it rather than proud of it.

    So, let's bring back that period in history now almost totally gone from all minds and memories. Look over these old charts and keep in mind these were the tunes our great-grandparents and grandparents bought, listened to, sang along to, whistled, laughed with and cried over.

    Here are those old charts in all their former glory. Keep note though that between 1940 and and 1945 many weekly charts were not compiled due to the disruption of the war and the chaos and heartache it brought to so many people. You will see this reflected in many of the old songs appearing on these charts. From 1946 though the chart settles into a weekly pattern.

    Enjoy.

    Brian

    Editing this post to add a link to Dropbox so it’s more readily accessible.

    https://www.dropbox.com/sh/00rws2j69...mzfNKw2Ga?dl=0
    Last edited by kingofskiffle; Mon August 23, 2021, 08:48. Reason: Added Dropbox link
    The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

  • #2
    Date WO LW TW Title
    30 Dec 1939 1 - 1 I'm Sending A Letter To Santa Claus
    1 - 2 There'll Always Be An England
    1 - 3 Wish Me Luck As You Wave Me Goodbye
    1 - 4 We'll Meet Again
    1 - 5 I'll Remember
    1 - 6 We're Gonna Hang Out The Washing On The Siegfried Line
    1 - 7 They Can't Black Out The Moon
    1 - 8 The Man With The Mandolin
    1 - 9 Kiss Me Goodnight Sgt. Major
    13 Jan 1940 2 - 1 I'll Remember
    2 - 2 We'll Meet Again
    1 - 3 In An 18th Century Drawing Room
    1 - 4 Somewhere In France With You
    2 - 5 There'll Always Be An England
    1 - 6 Goodnight Children Everywhere
    1 - 7 Goodbye Sally
    1 - 8 Run Rabbit Run
    1 - 9 Love Never Grows Old
    2 - 10 Wish Me Luck As You Wave Me Goodbye
    1 - 11 Beer Barrel Polka
    1 - 12 An Apple For The Teacher
    27 Jan 1940 1 - 1 Scatterbrain
    2 - 2 Somewhere In France With You
    2 - 3 In An 18th Century Drawing Room
    2 - 4 Goodnight Children Everywhere
    3 - 5 I'll Remember
    3 - 6 We'll Meet Again
    1 - 7 I'll Pray For You
    2 - 8 Goodbye Sally
    3 - 9 There'll Always Be An England
    2 - 10 Beer Barrel Polka
    03 Feb 1940 3 3 1 In An 18th Century Drawing Room
    3 2 2 Somewhere In France With You
    2 1 3 Scatterbrain
    2 7 4 I'll Pray For You
    3 4 5 Goodnight Children Everywhere
    3 8 6 Goodbye Sally
    1 - 7 Faithful Forever
    4 9 8 There'll Always Be An England
    4 6 9 We'll Meet Again
    1 - 10 I Shall Be Waiting
    4 5 11 I'll Remember
    17 Feb 1940 3 - 1 Scatterbrain
    4 - 2 In An 18th Century Drawing Room
    4 - 3 Somewhere In France With You
    3 - 4 I'll Pray For You
    4 - 5 Goodnight Children Everywhere
    1 - 6 It's A Lovely Day Tomorrow
    2 - 7 I Shall Be Waiting
    1 - 8 Bella Bambina
    4 - 9 Goodbye Sally
    5 - 10 I'll Remember
    09 Mar 1940 4 - 1 Scatterbrain
    1 - 2 Who's Taking You Home Tonight
    5 - 3 In An 18th Century Drawing Room
    5 - 4 Somewhere In France With You
    4 - 5 I'll Pray For You
    2 - 6 It's A Lovely Day Tomorrow
    1 - 7 In The Quartermaster's Stores
    1 - 8 There Goes My Dream
    1 - 9 Rosita (Her Name was Rosita)
    1 - 10 Over The Rainbow
    16 Mar 1940 5 1 1 Scatterbrain
    6 3 1 In An 18th Century Drawing Room
    2 2 2 Who's Taking You Home Tonight
    1 - 2 So Deep Is The Night
    2 10 3 Over The Rainbow
    2 9 3 Rosita (Her Name was Rosita)
    6 4 4 Somewhere In France With You
    3 6 4 It's A Lovely Day Tomorrow
    2 8 5 There Goes My Dream
    1 - 5 Careless
    1 - 6 Neath The Shanty Town Moon
    5 - 7 Goodnight Children Everywhere
    2 7 8 In The Quartermaster's Stores
    5 5 9 I'll Pray For You
    1 - 10 Seventeen Candles
    06 Apr 1940 3 - 1 Over The Rainbow
    3 - 2 Who's Taking You Home Tonight
    6 - 4 Scatterbrain
    3 - 5 Rosita (Her Name was Rosita)
    4 - 6 It's A Lovely Day Tomorrow
    3 - 7 There Goes My Dream
    2 - 8 Seventeen Candles
    1 - 9 You Made Me Care (When I Wasn't In Love)
    3 - 10 In The Quartermaster's Stores
    13 Apr 1940 4 1 1 Over The Rainbow
    1 - 2 There's A Boy Coming Home On Leave
    3 8 3 Seventeen Candles
    2 9 4 You Made Me Care (When I Wasn't In Love)
    4 2 5 Who's Taking You Home Tonight
    1 - 6 On Moonlight Avenue
    4 7 7 There Goes My Dream
    4 10 8 In The Quartermaster's Stores
    5 6 9 It's A Lovely Day Tomorrow
    7 - 10 In An 18th Century Drawing Room
    27 Apr 1940 5 - 1 Over The Rainbow
    2 - 1 There's A Boy Coming Home On Leave
    3 - 2 You Made Me Care (When I Wasn't In Love)
    2 - 2 So Deep Is The Night
    1 - 3 When You Wish Upon A Star
    1 - 3 Walkin' Thru' Mocking Bird Lane
    1 - 4 A Little Rain Must Fall
    1 - 4 Oh Johnny Oh Johnny Oh
    1 - 5 In An Old Dutch Garden
    2 - 5 On Moonlight Avenue
    5 - 6 Who's Taking You Home Tonight
    5 - 7 There Goes My Dream
    5 - 8 In The Quartermaster's Stores
    4 - 9 Seventeen Candles
    1 - 10 Dreaming
    04 May 1940 6 1 1 Over The Rainbow
    1 - 1 Arm In Arm (Just You And Me)
    3 1 2 There's A Boy Coming Home On Leave
    2 3 2 When You Wish Upon A Star
    4 2 3 You Made Me Care (When I Wasn't In Love)
    2 4 3 A Little Rain Must Fall
    3 2 4 So Deep Is The Night
    2 4 4 Oh Johnny Oh Johnny Oh
    2 5 5 In An Old Dutch Garden
    3 5 5 On Moonlight Avenue
    1 - 6 Let The Curtain Come Down
    1 - 7 Rainbow Valley
    2 3 8 Walkin' Thru' Mocking Bird Lane
    1 - 9 No Souvenirs
    5 9 10 Seventeen Candles
    18 May 1940 1 - 1 The Woodpecker Song
    5 - 1 You Made Me Care (When I Wasn't In Love)
    2 - 2 Arm In Arm (Just You And Me)
    3 - 2 In An Old Dutch Garden
    7 - 3 Over The Rainbow
    2 - 3 Let The Curtain Come Down
    4 - 4 There's A Boy Coming Home On Leave
    3 - 4 When You Wish Upon A Star
    3 - 5 Oh Johnny Oh Johnny Oh
    4 - 6 On Moonlight Avenue
    01 Jun 1940 2 - 1 The Woodpecker Song
    6 - 1 You Made Me Care (When I Wasn't In Love)
    1 - 2 The Nightingale Song
    1 - 2 When Our Dreams Grow Old
    8 - 3 Over The Rainbow
    2 - 3 No Souvenirs
    3 - 4 Arm In Arm (Just You And Me)
    1 - 4 If I Should Fall In Love Again
    1 - 5 Don't Ever Pass Me By
    4 - 5 So Deep Is The Night
    3 - 6 Let The Curtain Come Down
    5 - 7 There's A Boy Coming Home On Leave
    3 - 8 Walkin' Thru' Mocking Bird Lane
    4 - 9 Oh Johnny Oh Johnny Oh
    2 - 10 Dreaming
    08 Jun 1940 3 1 1 The Woodpecker Song
    2 2 1 When Our Dreams Grow Old
    2 5 2 Don't Ever Pass Me By
    2 4 2 If I Should Fall In Love Again
    2 2 3 The Nightingale Song
    7 1 3 You Made Me Care (When I Wasn't In Love)
    9 3 4 Over The Rainbow
    4 4 4 Arm In Arm (Just You And Me)
    5 5 5 So Deep Is The Night
    4 6 5 Let The Curtain Come Down
    3 3 6 No Souvenirs
    5 9 7 Oh Johnny Oh Johnny Oh
    1 - 8 The Singing Hills
    6 7 9 There's A Boy Coming Home On Leave
    4 8 10 Walkin' Thru' Mocking Bird Lane
    15 Jun 1940 4 1 1 The Woodpecker Song
    3 2 1 Don't Ever Pass Me By
    3 1 2 When Our Dreams Grow Old
    3 2 2 If I Should Fall In Love Again
    3 3 3 The Nightingale Song
    5 4 3 Arm In Arm (Just You And Me)
    2 8 4 The Singing Hills
    1 - 4 Too Romantic
    7 5 5 So Deep Is The Night
    5 5 5 Let The Curtain Come Down
    8 3 6 You Made Me Care (When I Wasn't In Love)
    6 7 7 Oh Johnny Oh Johnny Oh
    4 6 8 No Souvenirs
    3 - 9 Dreaming
    7 9 10 There's A Boy Coming Home On Leave
    The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks Brian!

      The idea of people en masse buying sheet music rather than records seems a bizarre notion these days. However at one time it was the popular way to "consume" music. I don't know how many working class people would have purchased sheet music but back then musical instruments, especially pianos, could be found in many homes.

      Some of the above titles have been so well knwn over the years that it is hard to think there was a time where they were new songs. Many titles listed above are unknown to me though.

      Are these all compiled by the Music Publishers Association?

      It's interesting that the first charts appeared less than four months after the outbreak of World War II. Does anyone know if the outbreak of war led to an increase in sales of sheet music? I can imagine that people would have wanted a pick-me-up to the doom and gloom of daily life.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks Robbie for the interesting feedback, glad you like. Initially The Sheet Music Chart was compiled by The Wholesale Music Distributors' Association a body long since extinct. The Music Publisher's Association took over on May 28th 1949. The chart became a Top 24 on 10th March 1951 then a Top 30 on 16th August 1958.
        The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

        Comment


        • #5
          Plenty of well remembered patriotic wartime songs there!

          'Run Rabbit Run' referenced the first (ineffectual) German air raid of the war - in which a rabbit (but no people!) was reportedly killed.

          Comment


          • #6
            A Top 24 from 10 Mar '51?! You'd think they could've stretched that one place further to make it a neater 25. Great work Brian and thank for posting. At least you didn't have to put the mathematics in for this strand that you did for the averaged '60s chart!

            What could be interesting is to compare the sheet music sales charts with the sales to retailers charts retro-compiled by Colin Brown for the 1940 to '52 period in the 'Missing Charts' book. It'd give some indication as to the degree of overlap there was between the two types of popular music consumption.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Gambo View Post
              What could be interesting is to compare the sheet music sales charts with the sales to retailers charts retro-compiled by Colin Brown for the 1940 to '52 period in the 'Missing Charts' book. It'd give some indication as to the degree of overlap there was between the two types of popular music consumption.
              I agree - however, there would be some issues with that. On the sheet music chart the song appears once, whilst on the sales chart it would (or could) appear multiple times in different versions. Quite the challenge to sort that lot out.

              http://thechartbook.co.uk - for the latest are best chart book - By Decade!
              Now including NME, Record Mirror and Melody Maker from the UK and some Billboard charts

              Comment


              • #8
                Hey guys, if you recall the Tiscali UK Pop Music History website, now defunct, but most of it still accessible on the Wayback Machine: it also has the sheet music charts 30 Dec 1939 thru 1959. Interestingly, next to the song titles, the charts show recording artists along with record label + number. Including multiple artists when there are ties for a given song.

                I don't know who put this together, when, where the data came from, or how they ranked the artists for a given tied song position, but it is most intriguing. Take a look, click on a given year in the upper left:

                https://web.archive.org/web/20170509...pmusichistory/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Here is a live version of Pop Music History. Sheet Music Is HERE.
                  trebor's - 2016 in Country Music
                  trebor's - 2015 in Country Music

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Now that is really a most interesting site. I never knew of its existence or I wouldn't have started this thread here when it already exists in more detail on another site.
                    At first I thought it had weeks that were missed on my transcripts but on closer examination it has no extra weeks just repeats the previous weeks. I find this reassuring as it confirms from another source that these weeks were almost certainly never compiled so what we both have is accurate.

                    I too would like to know where the information came from on versions supplied. Almost certainly these could not be confirmed as the the most popular at the time and most likely just available versions known to the author. Also the list is heavily biased in favour of British artists with just a sprinkling of American versions. I do find this strange as many American versions were also popular throughout this era.

                    I say this with a degree of certainty because many years ago I had a lengthy discussion on the telephone with Colin Morgan one of the authors of 'First Hits' the book on the sheet music charts. Colin advised me that when researching 'First Hits' they had hoped to establish the most popular version of songs for inclusion in the book but information of this nature just wasn't available in any shape or form from all sources they tried including the MPA and its predecessor who compiled the chart. So in the end they had to settle for just detailing all available versions.

                    That excellent site therefore has all the information and more that I was going to post anyway so no point in reinventing the wheel, so let's use that as the resource for the chart rather than duplication here.

                    Brian

                    The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thanks Trebor. Another excellent site using the same charts but expanded to 1965
                      The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by MrTibbs View Post
                        Now that is really a most interesting site. I never knew of its existence or I wouldn't have started this thread here when it already exists in more detail on another site.
                        At first I thought it had weeks that were missed on my transcripts but on closer examination it has no extra weeks just repeats the previous weeks. I find this reassuring as it confirms from another source that these weeks were almost certainly never compiled so what we both have is accurate.

                        I too would like to know where the information came from on versions supplied. Almost certainly these could not be confirmed as the the most popular at the time and most likely just available versions known to the author. Also the list is heavily biased in favour of British artists with just a sprinkling of American versions. I do find this strange as many American versions were also popular throughout this era.

                        I say this with a degree of certainty because many years ago I had a lengthy discussion on the telephone with Colin Morgan one of the authors of 'First Hits' the book on the sheet music charts. Colin advised me that when researching 'First Hits' they had hoped to establish the most popular version of songs for inclusion in the book but information of this nature just wasn't available in any shape or form from all sources they tried including the MPA and its predecessor who compiled the chart. So in the end they had to settle for just detailing all available versions.

                        That excellent site therefore has all the information and more that I was going to post anyway so no point in reinventing the wheel, so let's use that as the resource for the chart rather than duplication here.

                        Brian
                        Good idea, as it will save you having to post everything up. Thanks for starting the thread though. Hopefully Metalweb can still post the later Sheet Music charts that he was going to do after you had finished posting the ones you have.

                        Thanks to Robin and trebor for the links. I remember downloading the PDFs a number of years ago. I'll probably still have them somewhere but I'll download them again to make sure I have everything.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Yeah I'm interested in Metalweb,s later ones too
                          The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            From: www.popmusichistory.co.uk
                            by unknown author


                            UK Sheet Music by Record Charts 1946 - 1959

                            A brief explanation of this section.

                            First, this is not the true situation regarding total UK record sales of the period, but merely an assignment of the most popular versions bought for those songs where sheet music sales were popular. As an example, in November 1948 Ethel Smith was outselling every other record with her organ instrumental “The Green Cockatoo” yet no version of this song made it into the Sheet Music charts that year (it had appeared 2 years earlier for both Roberto Inglez and Mantovani), whilst in July 1948 Sam Browne was at No. 2 in the Sheet Music Charts with “Heartbreaker” with relatively small record sales.

                            In some cases versions appear because they were on the other side of the record where the main side was also included in the Sheet Music charts.

                            The early charts 1946 – May 1947 did not state chart positions. Instead the Top 10 was listed alphabetically with any song starting with the letter A appearing to beat anything starting with the letter B. Those song titles beginning with a bracket always beat everything else. In the listings in this document these early tracks are shown as position *

                            Myths
                            If you believe the rubbish that appears over and over again regarding sheet music you may be forgiven for believing that as people did not own gramophones they spent every evening at home having a sing-song around the piano. Whilst some people may have done this, most of the non-gramophonies would be more likely to be listening to the radio, chatting, reading or going out. Those who ventured to the local pub may have encountered a pub pianist who indeed would as likely as not have bought sheet music, although it is doubtful that it would be many of the Sheet Music hits of the day. After all if Mantovani and His Orchestra were at number 1 who would be singing this? There must have been an awful lot of la la la-ing. More likely the bulk of the purchases came from amatuer musicians or the vast number of local Dance Bands of the era, who without the benefit of photocopiers needed to buy copies for the various members of the band. The clever major bands would write and publish their own arrangements to earn an extra buck. A way around the photocopying included purchasing a fountain pen, a bottle of indelible ink, some metholated spirits and a machine which you could feed blank sheets of paper by the turning of a handle. This involved copying the music by hand using the indelible ink, and when this came into contact with the metholated spirits in the machine allowed the ink to be copied onto another sheet of paper. The end result was not great, but it was readable.

                            Sheet Music Only Available
                            In some cases the sheet music was bought by the bands as soon as it became available. This often resulted in the song getting in the Sheet Music charts but without anybody having actually recorded it on disc. Occasionally a hit was a result of a song being popular on the radio but by artists who did not have a recording contract. Also, it wasn’t unusual for an artist to be credited and their face appearing on the sheet music cover who did not have a recording of that song. An example of a delayed recording is Russ Conway’s big hit “Side Saddle” from 1959 where it’s popularity began on TV appearances some 3-4 weeks before he actually released the record. A more extreme example would be Patti Page’s 1950 version of Tennessee Waltz where hers was the most sold Sheet Music version for most of early 1951 yet unless imported from America was unavailable on record in the UK until May 1951 when Mercury Records begin issuing records on the UK Oriole label, by which time the song’s popularity was waning.

                            Where possible the exact Artist credits have been used with the backing Orchestra and vocalists displayed. However if the record states “conducted” or “under the direction of” this information is omitted. In some cases I have been unable to attain full details which can be frustrating for those searching out information regarding vocalists who quite often are given very little prominence in the billing, whilst most of the credit goes to the Band or Orchestra leader. Strangely the music industry seems to have reverted to this with more and more records of the 2010s giving the main credit to the Sound Engineer and merely stating “Feat. Joe Soap” and in some cases not mentioning who the singer is at all. They say “What goes round, comes around”.
                            trebor's - 2016 in Country Music
                            trebor's - 2015 in Country Music

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Some years ago I went thoroughly through the Tiscali site in order to extract more info from it. I found that in addition to sheet music positions it also used info from record charts to be able to include different versions, and some versions that were not record hits are also included. Obviously the site has problems with when to use ties where different versions appeared and when not. Positions for included records that did not chart seems to be based om educated guesses. My conclusion was that though far from perfect this contains interesting additional info that as of now is nowhere else to be found. Brian’s UAC of 54-55 is more reliable and his coming 55-59 will also be more reliable.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Does anyone know who owns / owned the Tiscali / popmusic history website? I remember the Tiscali version of the website from a decade ago. I think it may have gone offline around 2018 when owner TalkTalk closed the Tiscali Webspace servers. Good find of the live website by trebor as I thought the website was only living on via the Internet Archive link posted by Robin.

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  How do you explain these chart positions?

                                  10-Aug-1963 3 3 TWIST AND SHOUT - The BEATLES Parlophone GEP8882
                                  10-Aug-1963 3 3 TWIST AND SHOUT - BRIAN POOLE & The TREMELOES Decca F11694
                                  10-Aug-1963 3 3 TWIST AND SHOUT - The ISLEY BROTHERS Stateside SS112

                                  and,

                                  12-Oct-1963 2 1 DO YOU LOVE ME - BRIAN POOLE & The TREMELOES Decca F11739
                                  12-Oct-1963 2 1 DO YOU LOVE ME - The DAVE CLARK FIVE Columbia DB7112

                                  Why are all versions treated equally?

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Brian I think from what I see that available versions of songs were just randomly allocated to the sheet music chart position. At least for these years the record chart clearly indicated the best selling versions.
                                    The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      A great week for The Beatles.

                                      14-Dec-1963 1 1 I WANT TO HOLD YOUR HAND - The BEATLES Parlophone R5084
                                      14-Dec-1963 4 3 SHE LOVES YOU - The BEATLES Parlophone R5055
                                      14-Dec-1963 NEW 8 MONEY (From “With The Beatles” L.P.) - The BEATLES Parlophone PMC1206
                                      14-Dec-1963 24 19 ALL MY LOVING (From “With The Beatles” L.P.) - The BEATLES Parlophone PMC1206
                                      14-Dec-1963 NEW 21 I WANNA BE YOUR MAN (From “With The Beatles” L.P.) - The BEATLES Parlophone PMC1206
                                      14-Dec-1963 NEW 22 ROLL OVER BEETHOVEN (From “With The Beatles” L.P.) - The BEATLES Parlophone PMC1206
                                      14-Dec-1963 RE 23 TWIST AND SHOUT {3rd Re-entry} - The BEATLES Parlophone GEP8882
                                      14-Dec-1963 RE 26 I'LL GET YOU {Re-entry} - The BEATLES Parlophone R5055
                                      14-Dec-1963 NEW 30 TILL THERE WAS YOU (From “With The Beatles” L.P.) - The BEATLES Parlophone PMC120

                                      So even B-sides and LP tracks could enter the Top 30 chart many years before Ed Sheeran was heard of.

                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        And again,

                                        20-Jun-1964 2 1 HELLO, DOLLY! - LOUIS ARMSTRONG and The ALL STARS London HLR9878
                                        20-Jun-1964 2 1 HELLO DOLLY - FRANKIE VAUGHAN Philips BF1339
                                        20-Jun-1964 2 1 HELLO DOLLY - KENNY BALL and His JAZZMEN Pye Jazz 7NJ2071

                                        They can't all be selling the same amount of sheet music?

                                        Comment


                                        • #21
                                          Originally posted by brian05 View Post
                                          And again,

                                          20-Jun-1964 2 1 HELLO, DOLLY! - LOUIS ARMSTRONG and The ALL STARS London HLR9878
                                          20-Jun-1964 2 1 HELLO DOLLY - FRANKIE VAUGHAN Philips BF1339
                                          20-Jun-1964 2 1 HELLO DOLLY - KENNY BALL and His JAZZMEN Pye Jazz 7NJ2071

                                          They can't all be selling the same amount of sheet music?
                                          The Sheet music being sold was just Hello Dolly. The artists and record label numbers are added to let the public know that it's been recorded and available by the following acts. Sheet Music tended to put the most popular artist on the cover to help sell it. None of the artists actually put out a sheet music. Had they done that (which would have been completely pointless by the way, unless you just wanted a picture of the artist) each sheet would have separate position.
                                          In the 1940's to 1950's the system was that if you could write a song you would take it to the Music Publishers, a bit like book writing. They would publish and print the copies off. It would then be taken to the record labels and a guy would sing and play it on a piano to the A&R men of each label. They if they liked the tune/song would then say that would suit this artist and they would then record it.
                                          The best songs/tunes could be recorded by 10 or more artists. Sometimes on the same label.
                                          Many of the songs came from the USA too (such as Hello Dolly), even in the 60's the system was still working like that, hence all the people singing Lennon and McCartney songs. However those two guys did break the system. And more and more artists came forward to write and sing their own songs.

                                          If anyone's name should be on Hello Dolly then it should be (Jerry) Gerald Sheldon Herman. The guy who wrote it.
                                          Education for anyone aged 12 to 16 has made a mess of the world!

                                          Comment


                                          • #22
                                            The New Musical Express (NME) printed the Sheet Music chart listing the song/title. The NME chart carried a chart date so looking at the NME published on Friday 6 September 1963 this shows a chart date of Tuesday 3 September 1963. This chart corresponds with the sheet music chart of Saturday 31 August 1963 shown on the Pop Music History listings.

                                            Comment


                                            • #23
                                              Why didn't Luxembourg change over to record charts until 1960? That is ridiculously late!

                                              Comment


                                              • #24
                                                Originally posted by Splodj View Post
                                                Why didn't Luxembourg change over to record charts until 1960? That is ridiculously late!
                                                I've often pondered that one myself. Pop pundits generally agree that the record chart overtook the sheet music chart by late 1955 so it is strange that the most hip radio station of the time didn't jump on the record chart bandwagon a lot sooner.
                                                The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

                                                Comment


                                                • #25
                                                  Perhaps Luxembourg had a vested interest in maintaining the sheet music charts as their main chart. Didn't they have a variety of record company sponsored programmes? By not identifying a hit song with only one or two artists (as would happen in a sales chart) would that have led to labels wanting to spend more money to promote their version of a song? Though that suggestion does fall down by the late 1950s as multiple versions of songs were falling out of fashion.

                                                  Comment

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