Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

THE UK SHEET MUSIC CHARTS - Week By Week From December 1939

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #26
    The First Hits book suggests it was the sheer popularity of the "Top Twenty" show that kept the station using the Music Publishers Association charts. I suspect also the sheet music charts had a wider appeal to older listeners to the station, with less noisy Rock and Roll tracks being played. A bit like today - you wouldn't listen to Radio Two if you wanted the latest chart hits.
    Education for anyone aged 12 to 16 has made a mess of the world!

    Comment


    • #27
      To summarise info on the sheet music chart shows ..

      Luxembourg's first Top 20 show was on 1-Oct-48 at 11pm. The chart was from the previous week - i.e. the music press had already published the following week's chart by the time of broadcast. In May 1949 they started using the MPA chart.

      Meanwhile the BBC Light Programme started its 'Hit Parade' on 4-Jan-49 at 8pm. This is the same title of the AFN programme they had broadcast during the war and the later TV programme. However whereas the BBC had bands performing the hits, Luxy played records.

      When 'Pick Of The Pops' started there was a short overlap period when 'Hit Parade' was still running.

      Comment


      • #28
        The Radio Luxembourg Top Twenty Show's first presenter was Teddy Johnson who a few years later would become a recording artist in his own right who himself would record many songs that appeared in the sheet music chart. From the start it was Luxembourg's policy to vary the versions of a song they played each week so no one artist was favoured unless the only available recording was theirs.

        Melody Maker and NME both at this time paid 25 guineas each for the privilege of publishing the MPA charts. By the early fifties the MPA charts were compiled from around 65 major retailers sending in returns including Woolworths and British Home Stores. By 1959 though only 35 returns were being submitted. This drop in returns was perhaps the catalyst for Luxembourg finally moving over to a record chart Top 20.

        The last song generally believed to sell a million copies was That Doggie In The Window in 1953, the first evidence that the era of sheet music domination over records was beginning to wane.
        The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

        Comment


        • #29
          ^ Interesting stuff. It strikes me that it is a shame Woolies weren't as forthcoming with the BMRB in 1969 when approached to contribute towards the new industry-backed national sales charts as they apparently had been with providing data to the MPA on sheet music sales in the 1950s! I suppose as ever they were known for adopting a 'pick 'n' mix' approach....

          Comment


          • #30
            Originally posted by Gambo View Post
            ^ Interesting stuff. It strikes me that it is a shame Woolies weren't as forthcoming with the BMRB in 1969 when approached to contribute towards the new industry-backed national sales charts as they apparently had been with providing data to the MPA on sheet music sales in the 1950s! I suppose as ever they were known for adopting a 'pick 'n' mix' approach....
            I totally agree. To briefly step aside from the sheet music topic just to add to your comment, if Woolworths, who sold more singles than any other store, had from the start contributed to the BMRB chart it would have perhaps been much more robust from the start with lots more diary submission and as a massive nationwide store group would have hugely impacted the content of the chart.

            My problem with Woolworths though, even then, is that they would only stock records already in the chart, so new releases and other available singles would be hugely disadvantaged which would in turn have considerably slowed down the chart.
            The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

            Comment


            • #31
              I don't think having Woolies on board would have slowed down any chart. When they were on board after 1975 the chart wasn't slowed down at all. In fact what I think slowed the charts down at times was not having the full range of shops on board. Plus the record companies just were not releasing as many records till the middle 70's. The early 1950's charts of NME were dead slow. If you compare the last distribution chart of the Missing Hits book with the NME charts of few weeks later it's like NME's bunch of shops never got any new records at all! No wonder the chap who complied the Missing Charts thought that the NME chart was made up by the office girls!
              Education for anyone aged 12 to 16 has made a mess of the world!

              Comment


              • #32
                In 1965, when Woolworths stopped selling the Embassy covers, they installed displays for EMI and Decca. I imagine the chart compilers did not want to use them because it would have been unfair to the other record labels. Also, as the Woolworths Museum site says, the EMI and Decca displays "mainly focused on back catalogue items" rather than the charts. And you could definitely buy new records on the day of release as I can recall doing so.

                Comment


                • #33
                  Some stores must have differed though because I can remember having to get my non chart singles in Darrochs or Menzies because my local Woolworths only stocked what was in the chart.
                  The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

                  Comment


                  • #34
                    My local Woolworths only stocked the top 20/30 when I first started buying records in the mid 1970s. Before it closed in the mid 80s it had expanded that to a top 40 plus selected new records. My town also had a Woolco which stocked the full top 50/75 and in its later years (until it closed in the mid 80s) a number of new releases too.

                    Comment


                    • #35
                      By the mid seventies I preferred going into Glasgow to the many smaller independent stores who stocked a much greater selection of new releases where I got practically everything I was looking for.
                      The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

                      Comment


                      • #36
                        My local independent store was good for new releases, but when I asked for an oldie the manager would sigh heavily and produce a large blue catalogue book which he would thud down on the counter and challenge me to find it in there.

                        Comment


                        • #37
                          Haha I remember those big catalogue books too. The smaller independent shops back then were much friendlier and helpful with excellent music knowledge. Some even still had the listening booths. A very pleasurable and enjoyable way to choose and buy music back then.
                          The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

                          Comment


                          • #38
                            The reason many big stores didn't take part in the charts was because it gave sales information away to the competition. I also suspect that sales information could be leaked from the organisation doing the chart. There was a lot of corruption in all aspects of financial and political spheres of life in the 50's, 60's and 70's. With enough cash you could find out about anything. It also involved the staff making out returns to chart compilers for free!
                            There were also the practical implications. When the supermarkets started selling records etc most of the items went down as none food items. So it would be very difficult to tell what records had been sold.

                            The record companies soon got around getting a new release selling. They hyped slots 50 to 31. That put them in the top 50 so they would sell then.
                            Education for anyone aged 12 to 16 has made a mess of the world!

                            Comment


                            • #39
                              This is great stuff, especially with the archived website. I believe I am able to contribute more from 1966 and beyond....

                              Comment


                              • #40
                                I will now try to upload a pdf for Feb 1965. As all of you will notice, the charts for the date 30 Jan 1965 do not match the sheet music website. I will try to check further by checking my files against the website and the sheet music book for previous years.

                                I've been told that the upload [5 pages] exceeds the allowed amount.
                                Any suggestions?

                                Comment


                                • #41
                                  I believe attachments are not always the best way to go. Do you have Dropbox or a google account and if so you can share the file that way.
                                  http://thechartbook.co.uk - for the latest are best chart book - By Decade!
                                  Now including NME, Record Mirror and Melody Maker from the UK and some Billboard charts

                                  Comment


                                  • #42
                                    I've now done a screen capture of 30 Jan 1965. I do have Dropbox, so I can get into a routine of that.

                                    OK, it won't let me upload anything! Dropbox here we come.

                                    Comment


                                    • #43
                                      Originally posted by membranemusic View Post
                                      As all of you will notice, the charts for the date 30 Jan 1965 do not match the sheet music website.
                                      As an occasional buyer of sheet music about this time, I found the 'tray in the corner' had a rather motley collection. I could never count on it containing what I would most like.

                                      Comment


                                      • #44
                                        Hopefully here is the dropbox link for Feb 1965
                                        https://www.dropbox.com/s/e705odgrjk...01965.pdf?dl=0

                                        I look forward to your comments

                                        Comment


                                        • #45
                                          Thanks for the list, makes interesting reading. I assume the 2/6d is the price to the trade?
                                          http://thechartbook.co.uk - for the latest are best chart book - By Decade!
                                          Now including NME, Record Mirror and Melody Maker from the UK and some Billboard charts

                                          Comment


                                          • #46
                                            This is very interesting, Holmes. On a random check, the NME was using MPA figures in 1963 in its sheet music chart, but crucially was using other sources by 1964, and it seems 1965 also. Can someone check when the NME stopped printing the sheet music charts please?

                                            I shall now check my files against the above website to see when the MPA charts stopped being used on the tiscali website. This may take some time. Then we can know what date to start from.


                                            No, 2/6d was the price to the public. Sometimes it was a pocket-busting 3 shillings, and the Beatles song album cost me 5 shillings.....

                                            Comment


                                            • #47
                                              The plot thickens. In 1963, the charts appear to be exactly the same, but on the website given a date 7 days before that stated by NME and MPA, which is odd since MPA was the source. On 22 Aug 1964, the dates and chart is exactly the same. By pure chance it seems that from the following week of 29 Aug 1964 the tiscali website has a very different chart, although logical from a chart movement point-of-view.

                                              Comments please?

                                              Comment


                                              • #48
                                                NME last printed the sheet music chart, a Top 20 on Friday 5 February 1965. It shows a chart date as Tuesday 2 February 1965.

                                                Comment


                                                • #49
                                                  Thanks for posting! It's very interesting to see these charts in their original form of publication. It's the sheet music equivalent of someone posting the BMRB chart reports.

                                                  I love trying to work out what parts of the report refer to. What does A, B and F indicate?

                                                  Comment


                                                  • #50
                                                    Thanks for searching those out and posting for us membrane. I can never get enough of old charts.
                                                    The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

                                                    Comment

                                                    Working...
                                                    X