Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

THE UK SHEET MUSIC CHARTS - Week By Week From December 1939

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #51
    Originally posted by Robbie View Post
    I love trying to work out what parts of the report refer to. What does A, B and F indicate?
    Country of origin? A for American, B for British, F for foreign (mostly French or German). Seems to fit the titles I checked.

    Comment


    • #52
      Originally posted by setg1 View Post
      Country of origin? A for American, B for British, F for foreign (mostly French or German). Seems to fit the titles I checked.
      I'd never thought of that. Though it seems to be a bit too obvious...

      Comment


      • #53
        Hello
        OK, I’ve now done random checks on the 1950s. I can report that from 1950 to 1959 it seems that all the charts and dates match between the MPA bulletins, the website and the book.

        From 1960 to 1963, the charts match, but the dates do not. Most of the dates stated on the website are 7 days earlier than the bulletin. On the one hand there is no clue on the bulletins as to whether the date reflects the week of sale, or the following week of reporting/publication; but if this is the case, the date mismatch would be the other way round. On the other hand, this might be something to do with NME publishing deadlines. Q: when did NME change from Friday to Thursday publication?
        Radio Luxembourg by 1960 was out of the picture, so this was not the reason for a date mismatch.

        As noted, from August 1964, there are differences between the website charts and the MPA bulletins. This is guesswork, but if the NME deadlines shifted, they might have received from MPA and published a mid-week provisional chart (in the same way that OCC provides for their subscribers nowadays). Contributor Cyril has pointed out that the NME ceased the sheet music charts in Feb 1965, which explains why the website stops then.

        Q: when Record Retailer start publishing the MPA chart? I note it was just occasional during the 70s.

        I therefore propose I start posting via Dropbox the MPA charts from August 1964.

        Comment


        • #54
          OK

          MPA Aug 1964
          https://www.dropbox.com/s/zgs8xkx9jf...01964.pdf?dl=0


          MPA Sep 1964
          https://www.dropbox.com/s/dgx39f4bui...01964.pdf?dl=0

          MPA Oct 1964

          https://www.dropbox.com/s/m6x3lpy735...01964.pdf?dl=0

          Note there is one week missing in October, there's a date typo in September, and a coffee stain in August, which was not me, honest!

          More to come in due course.

          Comment


          • #55
            Laughed a lot at the coffee stain comment Thanks for adding these
            http://thechartbook.co.uk - for the latest are best chart book - By Decade!
            Now including NME, Record Mirror and Melody Maker from the UK and some Billboard charts

            Comment


            • #56
              Here are 3 more months:


              MPA Nov 1964
              https://www.dropbox.com/s/dc7a1rx2ga...01964.pdf?dl=0

              MPA Dec 1964
              https://www.dropbox.com/s/msyhkbk14v...01964.pdf?dl=0

              MPA Jan 1965
              https://www.dropbox.com/s/xz1soldqpd...01965.pdf?dl=0

              You already have Feb 1965.

              More later......

              Comment


              • #57
                Throughout the 1960s I think NME was always published on a Friday and up to and including 25 November 1966 carried the Friday publication date. From 3 December 1966 whilst still printing 'Evert Friday' within its heading, the paper carried a week ending date of Saturday.

                Comment


                • #58
                  I felt privileged in working for a veteran independent music publisher, very active from the 1940s to the 1980s. I learned a lot about the music business. You will note from time to time an underlining and circling of various titles that were his chart hits as a publisher.
                  Until I was given 3 large parcels wrapped in brown paper, I had no idea he had been a UK chart-watcher 15 years before anybody else.

                  MPA Mar 1965

                  https://www.dropbox.com/s/ppbxmjoghj...01965.pdf?dl=0

                  MPA Apr 1965
                  https://www.dropbox.com/s/cim4s1ssbu...01965.pdf?dl=0

                  MPA May 1965
                  https://www.dropbox.com/s/jiada47gjr...01965.pdf?dl=0

                  More to come....

                  Comment


                  • #59
                    Wonderful stuff. I never thought we would ever see the continuation of the sheet music charts beyond February 1965 but here we are with these fascinating charts seeing the light of day thanks to your brown paper parcels membrane. A personal thanks from me for both taking the time to seek them out from your attic and then post them on here.
                    The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

                    Comment


                    • #60
                      I note the dates on the charts. I know from the ones published in the music papers each chart was actually dated the week before. So for example MM would have an issue date of say 15th April but said this was the chart compiled week ending 8th April.

                      So the dates on your charts membrane, are those the compiled dates or the published dates a week later ?
                      The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

                      Comment


                      • #61
                        Originally posted by Cyril View Post
                        Throughout the 1960s I think NME was always published on a Friday and up to and including 25 November 1966 carried the Friday publication date. From 3 December 1966 whilst still printing 'Evert Friday' within its heading, the paper carried a week ending date of Saturday.
                        I always thought that nearly all the Music Papers were in the shops for Thursday. Indeed some of them refer to records "out tomorrow". And seeing the release date to be Friday, that would tie in with the Thursday publication date. Record Mirror especially was tied into this date, since a bank holiday Monday meant that they couldn't get the charts in time for the publication, either repeating lasts week's chart or not printing any charts at all. I think that ALL of them used the same date and they must have gone to the printers Wednesday.
                        Education for anyone aged 12 to 16 has made a mess of the world!

                        Comment


                        • #62
                          The response re the dates, Mr Tibbs, is I just don't know for certain, but I presume that it is the publication date, i.e. a week after the sales week.

                          You will note in the last batch that a Beatles B-side makes the Top 20 sheet music, even though it was not listed as a double-sided hit on the record charts. "Yes It Is" joins the list of 'lost' Beatles hits, such as "Twist & Shout", "Long Tall Sally ", and arguably the airplay hits of "Ask Me Why" and "It Won't Be Long"!

                          Comment


                          • #63
                            Where the Sheet Music Charts were useful, especially in the 1950's, even once the record charts assumed domination, is that it showed the overall popularity of individual songs as opposed to competing versions which could on occasion dilute the overall impact of a song.
                            The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

                            Comment


                            • #64
                              I was up in the attic this morning and accidentally came across some pages I had forgotten all about in respect of the sheet music charts of the fifties.

                              As I think you know Luxembourg's Top Twenty show in the fifties often played different versions of songs and not always the most popular one.

                              Anyway I came across pages this morning where an avid listener to the Top Twenty show documented each week which versions of songs were played each week on the Luxembourg Top Twenty show between April 1958 and December 1959 when Luxembourg ceased using the MPA chart. It makes for fascinating reading and is a really good insight into this period historically which is now lost to us. It makes it come alive again to see in print what versions of songs were actually played for each chart position and listened to at the time.
                              The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

                              Comment


                              • #65
                                The attic is a great place for discovering things....


                                MPA Jun 1965
                                https://www.dropbox.com/s/ljl6o952tc...01965.pdf?dl=0

                                MPA Jul 1965
                                https://www.dropbox.com/s/t2lb93ql83...01965.pdf?dl=0


                                MPA Aug 1965
                                https://www.dropbox.com/s/4n09n2c6xy...01965.pdf?dl=0


                                And it looks like there's another Beatles B-side hit: I'm Down.

                                more soon.....

                                Comment


                                • #66
                                  Originally posted by MrTibbs View Post
                                  Anyway I came across pages this morning where an avid listener to the Top Twenty show documented each week which versions of songs were played each week on the Luxembourg Top Twenty show between April 1958 and December 1959 ...
                                  Is that avid listener Zak Hosier?

                                  The recreated Luxembourg Top 20 shows for this period on Mixcloud, hosted by Simon Tate, rely on information provided by him. He listed the charts each week in various exercise books, and continued doing so into the 60s. So he is probably the only source for all the midweek NME charts they used. I've checked and can confirm that, contrary to some peoples statements on this forum, the midweek NME charts on Luxembourg were not the same as the NME charts that appeared in Billboard.

                                  Comment


                                  • #67
                                    Here's another batch:


                                    MPA Sep 1965
                                    https://www.dropbox.com/s/7n4bjvl7ca...01965.pdf?dl=0

                                    MPA Oct 1965
                                    https://www.dropbox.com/s/69mvmoahpvn4yms/MPA%20Oct%201965.pdf?dl=0


                                    MPA Nov 1965
                                    https://www.dropbox.com/s/7ufcizxjyce9qnw/MPA%20Nov%201965.pdf?dl=0

                                    Note that there was a typo on the date for the 2nd 30 Oct 65 chart, so I have taken the lore into my own hands , and labelled it 6 Nov 1965 based on the order the charts were stored, and risers and droppers in the chart.

                                    "Sweetheart Tree " is a bit of mystery; no trace as a record or sheet music seller; the PRS website is down today [maintenance?].

                                    For those who lost sleep in 1965 as to whether "Evil Hearted You" was more popular than its double A-side, the answer is "Stlll I'm Sad".

                                    More to come.

                                    Comment


                                    • #68
                                      I have two recordings of The Sweetheart Tree from the time by Henry Mancini and Johnny Mathis.
                                      The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

                                      Comment


                                      • #69
                                        Originally posted by Splodj View Post

                                        Is that avid listener Zak Hosier
                                        No Splodj the source I have is someone called Pat Heatherington who like your guy copied down the versions played every week between April 1958 and December 1959.
                                        The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

                                        Comment


                                        • #70
                                          There you have it Mr Tibbs re Sweetheart Tree.


                                          MPA Dec 1965
                                          https://www.dropbox.com/s/p8s3i8eqyb...01965.pdf?dl=0

                                          MPA Jan 1966
                                          https://www.dropbox.com/s/ve5vuozohv...01966.pdf?dl=0

                                          MPA Feb 1966
                                          https://www.dropbox.com/s/265cjo41hl...01966.pdf?dl=0

                                          Intriguingly, double-side-splitter Day Tripper and We Can Work It Out are neck and neck nearly all the way through their sheet music chart run.

                                          More to come!

                                          Comment


                                          • #71
                                            Unfortunately the typist is still being a bit casual with the dates, but it does work out. Also, the foolscap format is not brilliant for A4, so juggling is necessary.
                                            MPA Mar 1966
                                            https://www.dropbox.com/s/spf6s8x3fw...01966.pdf?dl=0


                                            MPA Apr 1966
                                            https://www.dropbox.com/s/zuls8q77sa...01966.pdf?dl=0


                                            MPA May 1966
                                            https://www.dropbox.com/s/g9p6irgydt...01966.pdf?dl=0

                                            More to come....

                                            Comment


                                            • #72
                                              Mr Tibbs and others, I got on to Mixcloud, and found references to SImon Tate and Radio Luxembourg, but both are big subjects. Do you have any further detail to home in on those interesting Lux charts 1958-1965? Should I search on Heatherington?

                                              Comment


                                              • #73
                                                Originally posted by membranemusic View Post
                                                Mr Tibbs and others, I got on to Mixcloud, and found references to SImon Tate and Radio Luxembourg, but both are big subjects. Do you have any further detail to home in on those interesting Lux charts 1958-1965? Should I search on Heatherington?
                                                Membrane, When I get time this week I'm gonna try and scan then post to my Dropbox Pat Hetherington's (I misspelt it above) versions played on the Luxembourg Top Twenty show between April 1958 and December 1959 for you and any others interested in seeing this piece of chart history.
                                                The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

                                                Comment


                                                • #74
                                                  Just listened to Simon Tate's recreated 208 Top 20 from 28th September 1958. There is a bit of confusion at the beginning when he says the chart is from NME, but it is insn't, and at the end he credits Zak Hosier as his source.
                                                  Top 5 are:
                                                  1. Volare - Dean Martin
                                                  2. Trudie - Jo 'Mr Piano' Henderson
                                                  3. When - Kalin Twins
                                                  4, Caroline Moon - Connie Francis
                                                  5. Tulips From Amsterdam - Max Bygraves

                                                  Comment


                                                  • #75
                                                    Originally posted by Splodj View Post
                                                    Just listened to Simon Tate's recreated 208 Top 20 from 28th September 1958. There is a bit of confusion at the beginning when he says the chart is from NME, but it is insn't, and at the end he credits Zak Hosier as his source.
                                                    Top 5 are:
                                                    1. Volare - Dean Martin
                                                    2. Trudie - Jo 'Mr Piano' Henderson
                                                    3. When - Kalin Twins
                                                    4, Caroline Moon - Connie Francis
                                                    5. Tulips From Amsterdam - Max Bygraves

                                                    The lists I have differ just a little from that

                                                    Pat Hetherington's 208 Top Twenty Show Playlist for 28th September 1958 as the broadcast date had

                                                    1 Volare - Lita Roza.
                                                    2 Trudie - Joe 'Mr Piano' Henderson
                                                    3 Tulips From Amsterdam - Max Bygraves.
                                                    4 When - The Kalin Twins
                                                    5 Return To Me - Dean Martin

                                                    BUT

                                                    On the 5th October, the following week, she had

                                                    1 Volare - The McGuire Sisters
                                                    2 Trudie - Joe 'Mr Piano' Henderson
                                                    3 When - The Kalin Twins
                                                    4 Carolina Moon - Connie Francis
                                                    5 Tulips From Amsterdam - Max Bygraves

                                                    Interesting !
                                                    The Ultimate Averaged Chart. The Definitive Chart Reflecting The Fifties and Sixties.

                                                    Comment

                                                    Working...
                                                    X