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THE RECORD MIRROR CHARTS - Re-Calculated, Re-Worked, and Extended

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  • Prior to World War II the main artists were the Orchestras. Vocal artists were usually used as refrain singers. Stateside of the Atlantic the fight for singers’ recognition started about midway of the war and the front man was Frank Sinatra. The fight turned the tides first in the US and later in Europe. When the first charts were published our side of the ocean the singers had in reality won already. I myself enjoy the mention in kingofskiffle’s chartbooks of orchestras and choruses in addition to the singers because they too have a profound effect on the end result. What is missing to give a complete picture of what counts is the mention of producer. Well, you can’t get all you wish for, but kingofskiffle comes very close to perfection.

    Comment


    • But the deliberately long gimmicky title 'Gilly Gilly Ossenfeffer Katzehellenbogen By The Sea' left not enough room to say who the backing children were.

      Incidentally Wikipedia says that the Max Bygraves phrase 'I wanna tell you a story' was made up by Mike Yarwood, but on this record he does say 'I'm gonna tell you a story'.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Splodj View Post
        But the deliberately long gimmicky title 'Gilly Gilly Ossenfeffer Katzehellenbogen By The Sea' left not enough room to say who the backing children were.

        Incidentally Wikipedia says that the Max Bygraves phrase 'I wanna tell you a story' was made up by Mike Yarwood, but on this record he does say 'I'm gonna tell you a story'.
        It's the same with 'This here the story' Lonnie Donegan says - the record company (allegedly) thought that was why Rock Island Line was a hit - so he used it on several songs that followed.
        http://thechartbook.co.uk - for the latest are best chart book - By Decade!
        Now including NME, Record Mirror and Melody Maker from the UK and some Billboard charts

        Comment


        • I was defending Winifred Atwell the other day and I can give the example of the difference in style between her and Charlie Kunz. His no.114 is a piano medley devoid of emotion whereas her hits are full of personality, hence why you shouldn't feel that people were wrong to buy her records in the 1950s.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by SharonMawer View Post
            I was defending Winifred Atwell the other day and I can give the example of the difference in style between her and Charlie Kunz. His no.114 is a piano medley devoid of emotion whereas her hits are full of personality, hence why you shouldn't feel that people were wrong to buy her records in the 1950s.
            I can't disagree with you Sharon and I do think Winnie's personality was the basis of her popularity and it did come across on her 'medleys' and sold them.
            That said it was the popularity that carried the medley records and not the quality of the material which really was quite dire on these.

            BUT, when given decent quality material she shone, never more than on her brilliant interpretation of 'The Story Of Three Loves', a truly excellent record.
            The Record Mirror Chart Re-Calculated, Re-Worked, Extended

            The Biggest Chart Of The Time

            Comment


            • Greetings Pop Pickers

              The Record Mirror Chart Re-Calculated Re-Worked Extended

              Chart For Week Ending Saturday 18th December 1954

              POS POS RECORD MIRROR CHART Re-Calculated Total Total Inv Inv
              LAST THIS TOP 56 (Based On 21 Dealers Returns) Gallup Dealer Points Points
              WEEK WEEK (Chart For Week Ending Saturday 18th December 1954) Points Charts Rank Scored
              1 1 Let's Have Another Party - Winifred Atwell 158.36 18 1 165
              4 2 Let's Get Together No 1 - The Big Ben Banjo Band 88.36 14 2 116
              5 3 I Still Believe / Veni Vidi Vici - Ronnie Hilton 69.13 14 3 81
              3 4 Santo Natale - David Whitfield 61.09 11 4 71
              2 5 Heartbeat - Ruby Murray 53.39 12 7 59
              7 6 No One But You - Billy Eckstine 50.18 11 6 63
              23 7 The Finger Of Suspicion / Who's Afraid - Dickie Valentine 48.42 10 9 53
              12 8 Let's Get Together No 2 - The Big Ben Banjo Band 45.97 8 5 64
              17 9 Mr Sandman - Dickie Valentine 41.96 9 8 56
              6 10 This Ole House - Rosemary Clooney 34.37 9 10 40
              10 11 I Need You Now - Eddie Fisher 34.03 8 11 39
              8 12 This Ole House - Billie Anthony 30.94 8 12 36
              11 13 My Son My Son - Vera Lynn with Frank Weir 29.10 6 13 35
              14 14 Mr Sandman / Do You Love Old Santa Claus - Max Bygraves 28.05 7 14 32
              33 15 Mr Sandman - The Four Aces 22.86 5 15 30
              22 16 How Do You Speak To An Angel - Dean Martin 20.10 3 16 21
              9 17 Am I A Toy Or A Treasure - Kay Starr 18.21 5 21 17
              42 18 Rain Rain Rain - Frankie Laine and The Four Lads 17.98 5 24 16
              16 19 I Can't Tell A Waltz From A Tango - Alma Cogan 17.80 4 17 20
              32 20 I Can't Tell A Waltz From A Tango - Patti Page 16.51 4 19 19
              29 21 Let's Have A Party - Winifred Atwell 15.75 4 28 13
              19 22 Piano Medley No 114 - Charlie Kunz 15.62 3 17 20
              24 23 Party Sing Song - Vera Lynn 15.28 4 21 17
              21 24 I Still Believe - Al Martino 14.23 3 21 17
              34 25 Papa Loves Mambo - Perry Como 13.65 3 20 18
              44 26 Join In And Sing - The Johnston Brothers 12.46 4 34 9
              30 27 White Christmas - Chris Barber 12.03 2 24 16
              13 28 If I Give My Heart To You - Joan Regan 11.96 3 26 15
              15 28 If I Give My Heart To You - Doris Day 11.96 3 26 15
              18 30 Hold My Hand - Don Cornell 11.66 3 28 13
              44 31 Papa Loves Mambo - Johnnie Ray 10.96 3 32 12
              59 32 Rock Around The Clock - Bill Haley and His Comets 10.63 2 28 13
              # 33 Mambo Italiano - Rosemary Clooney 10.07 3 34 9
              36 34 Shake Rattle And Roll - Bill Haley and His Comets 10.00 1 33 10
              37 35 Happy Days And Lonely Nights - Suzi Miller 9.40 2 28 13
              # 36 Hold My Hand - Nat King Cole 6.42 2 38 5
              # 37 Mr Sandman - The Chordettes 4.42 1 36 6
              42 37 Two Kinds Of Tears - Joan Regan 4.42 1 36 6
              35 39 New Juke Box Saturday Night - The Modernaires 3.95 1 38 5
              # 40 I Am In Love - Nat King Cole 3.59 1 40 4
              # 40 Honey Love - Vicki Young 3.59 1 40 4
              # 40 Music From 'Salad Days' (EP) - Julian Slade 3.59 1 40 4
              55 40 I Love Paris - Tony Martin 3.59 1 40 4
              # 40 Teviot Brig - Jimmy Shand 3.59 1 40 4
              # 45 No One But You - Al Martino 3.29 1 45 3
              # 46 Cole Porter's Can-Can (LP) - The Original Broadway Cast 3.06 1 46 2
              # 46 I Understand (Just How You Feel) - Jimmy Young 3.06 1 46 2
              59 46 Papa Loves Mambo - Nat King Cole 3.06 1 46 2
              25 46 Sh-Boom - Stan Freberg 3.06 1 46 2
              27 46 Sway - Dean Martin 3.06 1 46 2
              41 51 Silent Night - Bing Crosby 2.83 1 51 1
              # 51 Honey Love - Dennis Lotis with Ted Heath 2.83 1 51 1
              # 51 Unbelievable - Nat King Cole 2.83 1 51 1
              40 51 Smile - Nat King Cole 2.83 1 51 1
              # 51 A Sky Blue Shirt And A Rainbow Tie - Norman Brooks 2.83 1 51 1
              # 51 How Do You Speak To An Angel - Eddie Fisher 2.83 1 51 1
              The Record Mirror Chart Re-Calculated, Re-Worked, Extended

              The Biggest Chart Of The Time

              Comment


              • So Winnifred Atwell's dominance is starting to wain as she no longer has twice as many points as the no. 2. We lost 3 dealer charts, but she lost 4 and for the first time (on its 4th week) the average dealer Gallup score drops below 9. The average score is still above 9 giving her mainly no.1s.... Interestingly looking back Winnifred Atwell is not the most dominant of all. The highest average scores so far are 10 and 9.6 for the first 2 weeks of Don Cornell's Hold My Hand being no.1. Admittedly for the first of these (18/9/1954) there were only 14 dealers, but Don Cornell was no.1 on 12 of them and didn't register at all on the other 2. The second chart (25/9/1954) there were 21 dealers of which Don Cornell was on 18; probably no.1 on 15 and 2 on 3 (or no.1 on 16, 2 on 1 and 1 on 3, or no.1 on 17 and no.4 on 1?). All other weeks, the average score for the no.1 has been between 6 and 8.3

                Comment


                • Originally posted by braindeadpj View Post
                  So Winnifred Atwell's dominance is starting to wain as she no longer has twice as many points as the no. 2. We lost 3 dealer charts, but she lost 4 and for the first time (on its 4th week) the average dealer Gallup score drops below 9. The average score is still above 9 giving her mainly no.1s.... Interestingly looking back Winnifred Atwell is not the most dominant of all. The highest average scores so far are 10 and 9.6 for the first 2 weeks of Don Cornell's Hold My Hand being no.1. Admittedly for the first of these (18/9/1954) there were only 14 dealers, but Don Cornell was no.1 on 12 of them and didn't register at all on the other 2. The second chart (25/9/1954) there were 21 dealers of which Don Cornell was on 18; probably no.1 on 15 and 2 on 3 (or no.1 on 16, 2 on 1 and 1 on 3, or no.1 on 17 and no.4 on 1?). All other weeks, the average score for the no.1 has been between 6 and 8.3
                  Excellent and very detailed stats there David. I always enjoy your overviews on the charts. Because I am so close to them by compiling them I sometimes can't see the wood for the trees so to speak so don't fully appreciate the story behind them until you bring them to life.

                  Thanks again for presenting these for us to enjoy.
                  The Record Mirror Chart Re-Calculated, Re-Worked, Extended

                  The Biggest Chart Of The Time

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by MrTibbs View Post

                    Excellent and very detailed stats there David. I always enjoy your overviews on the charts. Because I am so close to them by compiling them I sometimes can't see the wood for the trees so to speak so don't fully appreciate the story behind them until you bring them to life.

                    Thanks again for presenting these for us to enjoy.
                    Thank you for going ahead with this mammoth undertaking and giving me something to provide an overview of (and of course for everyone else to enjoy also).

                    Comment


                    • 18/11/1954
                      Re-entries
                      40 Music From 'Salad Days' (EP) - Julian Slade
                      45 No One But You - Al Martino
                      51 A Sky Blue Shirt And A Rainbow Tie - Norman Brooks
                      51 How Do You Speak To An Angel - Eddie Fisher

                      Flip sides
                      7 The Finger of Suspicion -Frankie Vaughan regained its flipside Who’s Afraid this week.
                      36 Hold My Hand – Nat King Cole was listed with its flipside If I Give My Heart To You at 20 last week.
                      40 I Am In Love – Nat King Cole was listed for one week a while back with its flipside There Goes My Heart, which was on the chart 2 weeks ago.
                      40 Teviot Brig – Jimmy Shand is the flipside to The Irish Waltz which was on the chart at 59 last week.

                      Full credit for 33 Mambo Italiano is Rosemary Clooney and the Mellomen with Orchestra conducted by Buddy Cole.
                      Full credit for 37 Mister Sandman is The Chordettes with the Archie Bleyer Orchestra.
                      Full credit for 40 Honey Love is Vicki Young with Big Dave and His Orchestra.
                      Full credit for 46 I Understand Just How You Feel is Jimmy Young accompaniment directed by Bob Sharples
                      Full credit for 51 Honey Love is Dennis Lotis with Ted Heath and his Music.

                      Four records charted for the first ever this week. Two are by new artists – though one (Dennis Lotis) has charted several times on the RM Dealer chart before. Other new artist is:
                      Vicki Young with Big Dave and His Orchestra

                      The drop in 3 dealers and 10 positions (compared to last week) impacts the multiples, but there are still several:
                      This week there are 23 multiple entries of 10 songs:

                      4 Mister Sandman (Dickie Valentine, Max Bygraves, The Four Aces, The Chordettes)

                      3 Papa Loves Mambo (Perry Como, Johnnie Ray, Nat King Cole)
                      2 No One But You (Billy Eckstine, Al Martino)
                      2 This Ole House (Rosemary Clooney, Billie Anthony)
                      2 How Do You Speak To An Angel? (Dean Martin, Eddie Fisher)
                      2 I Can’t Tell a Waltz From a Tango (Alma Cogan, Patti Page)
                      2 If I Give My Heart to You (Joan Regan, Doris Day) – also on Charlie Kunz Piano Medley no. 114
                      2 Hold My Hand (Don Cornell, Nat King Cole) – also on Charlie Kunz Piano Medley no. 114

                      2 I Still Believe (Ronnie Hilton, Al Martino)
                      2 Honey Love (Vicki Young, Dennis Lotis with Ted Heath)

                      So there are 43 unique records on the chart this week.

                      We also have 11 artists with multiple appearances (25):

                      5 Nat King Cole (Hold My Hand, I Am In Love, Papa Loves Mambo, Unbelievable, Smile)
                      2 The Big Ben Banjo Band (Let’s Get Together No.1, Let’s Get Together No.2)

                      2 Dickie Valentine (The Finger of Suspicion, Mister Sandman)
                      2 Rosemary Clooney (This Ole House, Mambo Italiano)

                      2 Eddie Fisher (I Need You Now, How Do You Speak To An Angel)
                      2 Winifred Atwell (Let’s Have Another Party, Let’s Have A Party)
                      2 Joan Regan (If I Give My Heart to You, Two Kinds of Tears)
                      2 Vera Lynn (My Son My Son (with Frank Weir), Party Sing Song)

                      2 Al Martino (I Still Believe, No One But You)

                      2 Bill Haley and His Comets (Rock Around the Clock, Shake Rattle and Roll)
                      2 Dean Martin (Sway, How Do You Speak To An Angel)

                      Johnny Douglas and His Orchestra (or Johnny Douglas band in the last instance) is associated with 4 tracks (Mister Sandman – Dickie Valentine, Happy Days and Lonely Nights – Suzi Miller, I Still Believe – Al Martino, Join In and Sing – The Johnston Brothers)



                      giving us 42 different artists (not counting combinations).

                      The number of Christmas songs has nearly halved. We now have 4 Christmas songs; Santo Natale, Do You Love Old Santa Claus, White Christmas. Silent Night.

                      Comment


                      • Hey chart freaks, Record Research is publishing a new chart book, compiled from the Gavin Report radio airplay charts in the US 1958-2000. Great googly moogly !! The usual chart book by artist / records, not the charts themselves. Will be in stock December 2022, pre-order yours today, operators are standing by, ha. Early bird pricing at $54.95 plus shipping. Here's a flyer with all the details:

                        https://www.recordresearch.com/books...ort-1958-2000/

                        Comment


                        • I find reading individual Gavin reports quite interesting, to see what was being tipped at a particular point in time to happen next, but I don't see how this could be captured in a classified list.

                          ​​​The blurb says it contains 'every record that made the Top 40 of The Gavin Report' from 1958, implying a consistent Top 40 airplay chart. But I've just looked at a report in 1970 and there was only a Top 20 then; there are 20 more that are 'gaining in several markets' but these are not given positions. In 1964 there was actually a Top 50, but fallers below 25 were excluded.

                          ​​​​​​

                          Comment


                          • That's kinda what I'm seeing too, Splodj. I looked up 3 issues of the Gavin Report on World Radio History (1964, 1970, 1975), and it's difficult to gather a formal constructed chart from all the info. And there is lots of info. Not just pop, but RnB, country, adult contemporary. I reckon Joel or Paul will have explained what all they are doing in this book. I'm still game anyway, have some spare money to burn, ha...

                            Comment


                            • I forgot to mention the stats I observed from the 7 sample pages offered. I noted the indicated 36 record sides or EP / LP cuts that did not chart on the Hot 100, as follows:

                              --5 were B-sides
                              --10 were album cuts
                              --1 was from a regional EP
                              --2 were from a regional LP
                              --14 were regional only hits
                              --4 were A-sides

                              If that ratio per page holds, it would indicate 1800 additional records / tracks that didn't hit the Hot 100. But don't quote me on that...

                              Also, there were 11 artists that did not chart on the Hot 100, though 9 of their records were regional only hits.

                              There were 5 record sides shown as peaking between positions 41-50 during 1961-64 for these 7 sample pages.

                              P.S. The book is 350 pages, 8.5 x 11 inches.

                              Comment


                              • Yeah, I saw the same Robin. How high percentage of the 1800 do you estimate are to be found in Record Research’s Radio and Records book?

                                Comment


                                • Greetings Pop Pickers,

                                  Just below is the next chart for the week ending 25th December 1954. Not only is it the last chart of the year but it is the only chart for this week as NME did not publish a chart for this week (or the next).
                                  That said, only 11 dealers submitted a new chart for this week but even although not perhaps as robust it still gives us a good competent Top 40.

                                  1955 lies just around the corner but I'm afraid you will need to wait a week for this to commence posting as I'm off later today for my last holiday of the year to enjoy some hot sunshine in Tenerife for a week before the hefty heating bills start to arrive.

                                  As I'm still compiling a few weeks ahead of what I post here, the chart for 1st January will be here with you next weekend when I return.

                                  This means you will get a chart for 1st January again compiled from 11 new submitted dealer returns. NME as mentioned above did not compile a chart for that week.

                                  Take care of yourself and look after each other until I get back.

                                  Brian
                                  The Record Mirror Chart Re-Calculated, Re-Worked, Extended

                                  The Biggest Chart Of The Time

                                  Comment


                                  • Greetings Pop Pickers

                                    The Record Mirror Chart Re-Calculated Re-Worked Extended

                                    Chart For Week Ending Saturday 25th December 1954

                                    POS POS RECORD MIRROR CHART Re-Calculated Total Total Inv Inv
                                    LAST THIS TOP 40 (Based On 11 Dealers Returns) Gallup Dealer Points Points
                                    WEEK WEEK (Chart For Week Ending Saturday 25th December 1954) Points Charts Rank Scored
                                    1 1 Let's Have Another Party - Winifred Atwell 79.10 10 1 86
                                    2 2 Let's Get Together Again No 1 - The Big Ben Banjo Band 41.45 7 2 55
                                    5 3 Heartbeat - Ruby Murray 32.34 7 5 33
                                    4 4 Santo Natale - David Whitfield 31.06 5 3 37
                                    7 5 The Finger Of Suspicion - Dickie Valentine 30.86 6 5 33
                                    3 6 I Still Believe / Veni Vidi Vici - Ronnie Hilton 25.57 5 4 34
                                    8 7 Let's Get Together Again No 2 - The Big Ben Banjo Band 24.81 4 5 33
                                    12 8 This Ole House - Billie Anthony 21.85 6 10 24
                                    15 9 Mr Sandman - The Four Aces 21.72 4 8 29
                                    9 9 Mr Sandman - Dickie Valentine 21.72 4 8 29
                                    23 11 Party Sing Song - Vera Lynn 17.64 4 11 22
                                    26 12 Join In And Sing - The Johnston Brothers 17.51 4 12 21
                                    19 13 I Can't Tell A Waltz From A Tango - Alma Cogan 14.69 4 14 15
                                    6 14 No One But You - Billy Eckstine 13.35 4 16 12
                                    51 15 Silent Night - Bing Crosby 12.79 2 13 17
                                    10 16 This Ole House - Rosemary Clooney 11.96 3 14 15
                                    21 17 Let's Have A Party - Winifred Atwell 10.00 1 18 10
                                    28 18 If I Give My Heart To You - Joan Regan 9.87 2 18 10
                                    28 19 If I Give My Heart To You - Doris Day 9.71 3 21 8
                                    33 20 Mambo Italiano - Rosemary Clooney 9.48 3 24 7
                                    14 21 Mr Sandman - Max Bygraves 8.94 2 16 12
                                    32 22 Rock Around The Clock - Bill Haley and His Comets 7.04 1 20 9
                                    22 23 Piano Medley No 114 - Charlie Kunz 5.88 2 33 3
                                    13 24 My Son My Son - Vera Lynn with Frank Weir 5.75 1 21 8
                                    24 24 I Still Believe - Al Martino 5.75 1 21 8
                                    # 26 White Christmas - Bing Crosby 5.65 2 36 2
                                    25 27 Papa Loves Mambo - Perry Como 4.99 1 24 7
                                    35 27 Happy Days And Lonely Nights - Suzi Miller 4.99 1 24 7
                                    37 27 Mr Sandman - The Chordettes 4.99 1 24 7
                                    34 27 Shake Rattle And Roll - Bill Haley and His Comets 4.99 1 24 7
                                    40 31 Honey Love - Vicki Young 4.42 1 29 6
                                    30 32 Hold My Hand - Don Cornell 3.95 1 30 5
                                    # 33 Teach Me Tonight - The De Castro Sisters 3.59 1 31 4
                                    40 33 Music From 'Salad Days' (EP) - Julian Slade 3.59 1 31 4
                                    46 35 Cole Porter's Can-Can (LP) - The Original Broadway Cast 3.29 1 33 3
                                    40 35 I Love Paris - Tony Martin 3.29 1 33 3
                                    # 37 Scottish Country Dances No 2 (LP) - Jimmy Shand 3.06 1 36 2
                                    11 37 I Need You Now - Eddie Fisher 3.06 1 36 2
                                    17 39 Am I A Toy Or A Treasure - Kay Starr 2.83 1 39 1
                                    18 39 Rain Rain Rain - Frankie Laine and The Four Lads 2.83 1 39 1
                                    * Due to being Christmas week only 11 dealers sent in new returns this week.
                                    NME did not compile a chart for this week
                                    The Record Mirror Chart Re-Calculated, Re-Worked, Extended

                                    The Biggest Chart Of The Time

                                    Comment


                                    • Looks like it is going to be cloudy here next week, so have a good time in Tenerife!

                                      Comment


                                      • I'm off later today for my last holiday of the year to enjoy some hot sunshine in Tenerife for a week before the hefty heating bills start to arrive.

                                        I hope you like it hot. I live on the island next door, Gran Canaria and at 10.00am this morning it was 31 degrees. Greatly enjoying listening to these charts after you've posted them. The bars and clubs over here don't play many (Any) of the songs from this era.

                                        By the way what's a heating bill?

                                        Comment


                                        • Originally posted by kjell View Post
                                          Yeah, I saw the same Robin. How high percentage of the 1800 do you estimate are to be found in Record Research’s Radio and Records book?
                                          Good question Kjell. Noting that Radio & Records ran from 1973-2009, and Gavin 1958-2000, just doing the math in # of non-Hot 100 Gavin records / tracks per year, that might indicate Gavin could supply an additional 643 records / tracks alone from 1958-73 that didn't chart on the Hot 100. And possibly more, as these were the days of essentially free-form independent radio stations, where every station played what THEY wanted to play, not what national paid consultants and accountants told them to play. Known as "the golden era of AM Top 40 radio".

                                          From 1973-2000, I have no idea, but assume there would most likely be a lot of overlap there. So if one's interest in music lies after 1973 and you already have the R & R book, you probably don't need the Gavin book. But if your interest is before 1973, then you would. And if you're a chart freak, you need the book regardless, ha...

                                          Comment


                                          • So even on nearly half as many dealers as previously, Winifred Atwell still reigns supreme. She is on 10/11 dealers and no.1 on a maximum of 7 of them (probably less) compared with the no.2 only being on 7/11 dealer charts. Winifred Atwell still has nearly double the Gallup score (gap is 92% of the no.2 score) while her inverse score is only 56% higher (than the no.2) or to put it another way no.2 is 53% of the no.1 on Gallup score and 64% on Inverse compared to 56% and 70% last week.

                                            BTW, while this is the last chart of the published year, it is of course using data from the 11th to 17th of December. The true end of the year would therefore be the chart dated 8th January (covering sales 25th to 31st December). I was considering generating an end of year overview, so which chart do you think it should end with - published year ie this one (so 25 weeks of charts), or real end of year data in 2 weeks time (27 weeks of charts) or split the difference and do 26 weeks of charts counting the 1st January 1955 as the last one (again a smaller dealer number chart)?
                                            Last edited by braindeadpj; Fri September 16, 2022, 17:18.

                                            Comment


                                            • I poked a little more into the Gavin Report issues on World Radio History, and I think I know what Record Research might be doing with their new Gavin book. So I'm guessing first, they used all the Gavin charts as published, whether they bee a Top 40 or 50 or 20, as they fluctuated over time. Then for the period when there was only a Top 20 chart, they added on the records that appeared in the "Gaining In Several Markets Section", to create (I'm guessing) at least a Top 40 chart. Then they compiled all these "charted" records by artist.

                                              For example, in looking at the 19 Dec 1975 issue on World Radio History, we have a Top 20 chart. To the right of that, we have the "Gaining In Several Markets" list of 20 more records, seemingly in a ranked order (as compared with the "Top 40 Station Reports" below) but not stated as such. Below these columns, we have 2 records listed as "Top Prospects" (which are also in the "Gaining" list). Then below that, a section of "Regional Sales and/or Requests" (18 records), and beside that a section of "Picks & Plays" (19 records).

                                              Then scrolling down several pages there is a section of "Top 40 Station Reports" with 34 records, listed in reverse order according to how many stations are playing these records, with some stations listed, some with rankings.

                                              The 20 "Gaining In Several Markets" (including the 2 "Top Prospects") plus 11 of the 18 "Regional Sales" records are included in the "Top 40 Station Reports" list of 34 records. None of the "Picks & Plays" are included. And none of the "Top 20" appears in any of these 5 other sections.

                                              So for this particular week, one could possibly construct a much longer Gavin chart, kinda sorta. Starting with the Top 20, followed by the 20 "Gaining In Several Markets" (including the 2 "Top Prospects"), followed by 14 others in "Top 40 Station Reports", then 7 more records in the "Regional Sales", and then possibly followed by the 19 "Picks & Plays". This would sum up to a Top 80 chart. If one could do that...

                                              Anyway, I think this new Gavin Reports book will be fab, factually and logically based. So I'm in regardless, ha...

                                              Comment


                                              • Originally posted by braindeadpj View Post
                                                published year ie this one (so 25 weeks of charts)
                                                Because this is when music papers and radio stations at the time would regard as the year end.

                                                Comment


                                                • Originally posted by RokinRobinOfLocksley View Post
                                                  Anyway, I think this new Gavin Reports book will be fab, factually and logically based.
                                                  I think there are two factors to bear in mind though.

                                                  1. By excluding fallers below 20/25 it is not a straight airplay chart. (I doubt the airplay constituency of the Billboard chart excluded fallers.) This appears to be part of the 'tipping' exercise and not a reflection of what was being played by stations, who realised that people still wanted to listen to chart records even when falling. Also if Gavin didn't exclude fallers when they got to a.Top 40 there is inconsistency.

                                                  2. You would only hear the 80 or so records you mention if you travelled around the country listening to stations in all areas. Listening to your local station you would only hear their Top 40.

                                                  Comment


                                                  • 25/12/1954
                                                    Probably due to the near halving of the number of dealers the numbers of new (2) or re-entries (1) are greatly reduced (though of course could also be the run up to Christmas meaning there’s less movement?). Several records that previously listed both sides are now only listing one (in fact Ronnie Hilton is the only one that lists both sides this week and has done so from its debut). This will also impact multiple songs and multiple artists.

                                                    Re-entries
                                                    26 White Christmas - Bing Crosby

                                                    Flipsides
                                                    5 Finger of Suspicion lost its flipside Who’s Afraid
                                                    21 Mister Sandman lost its flipside Do You Love Old Santa.

                                                    Full credit for 33 Teach Me Tonight is The DeCastro Sisters with the Skip Martin Orchestra. This will feature on the NME chart in February, but is new to the RM chart.

                                                    We currently have 2 LPs and 1 EP on the chart. Both Sway-Dean Martin (20 nonconsecutive weeks) and Smile-Nat King Cole (17 consecutive weeks) left the chart so the track that has been on the current chart the longest is Hold My Hand – Don Cornell (17 consecutive weeks).

                                                    This week there are 10 multiple entries of 4 songs:

                                                    4 Mister Sandman (The Four Aces, Dickie Valentine, Max Bygraves, The Chordettes)
                                                    2 This Ole House (Billie Anthony, Rosemary Clooney)
                                                    2 If I Give My Heart to You (Joan Regan, Doris Day) – also on Charlie Kunz Piano Medley no. 114
                                                    2 I Still Believe (Ronnie Hilton, Al Martino)
                                                    So there are 34 unique records on the chart this week.

                                                    We also have 6 artists with multiple appearances (12):

                                                    2 The Big Ben Banjo Band (Let’s Get Together No.1, Let’s Get Together No.2)
                                                    2 Dickie Valentine (The Finger of Suspicion, Mister Sandman)
                                                    2 Rosemary Clooney (This Ole House, Mambo Italiano)

                                                    2 Winifred Atwell (Let’s Have Another Party, Let’s Have A Party)
                                                    2 Vera Lynn (My Son My Son (with Frank Weir), Party Sing Song)
                                                    2 Bill Haley and His Comets (Rock Around the Clock, Shake Rattle and Roll)

                                                    Johnny Douglas and His Orchestra (or Johnny Douglas band in the last instance) is associated with 4 tracks (Mister Sandman – Dickie Valentine, Happy Days and Lonely Nights – Suzi Miller, I Still Believe – Al Martino, Join In and Sing – The Johnston Brothers)


                                                    giving us 34 different artists (not counting combinations).

                                                    We now only have 3 Christmas songs; Santo Natale, White Christmas. Silent Night.


                                                    Comment

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