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Beatles chart positions in `ALL` UK charts!

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  • Beatles chart positions in `ALL` UK charts!

    BEATLES SINGLES, EPs & LPs : FULL CHART POSITIONS.

    This article will show “The Beatles” full chart positions for all their singles, EPs and LPs which made the singles charts, from 1962 to 1970. The positions will be in the major national charts of the period; namely; New Musical Express (NME), Record Retailer (RR), Melody Maker (MM), British Market Research Bureau (BMRB) and Disc (D). Also included is the BBC Pick Of The Pops (POTP) chart which averaged out the major charts to produce a weighted average Top 30. The Pick Of The Pops chart was a Top 30 from 14 April 1962 to its last issue on 8 February 1969. From 15 February 1969 the BBC used the new BMRB chart

    The Disc chart; ceased on 26 August 1967. From that date it used the Melody Maker listing. The Record Retailer chart ceased on 15 February 1969; from that date it was replaced by the British Market Research Bureau (BMRB) listing; which will be used. Data from lesser national charts will be included on some records. These charts are Pop Weekly (PW), Merseybeat-later changed title in 1965 to Music Echo (M / ME) and Top Pops –later changed title in 1970 to Music Now (TP / MN).

    The problems with these `lesser` charts; are two-fold. Firstly, both Pop Weekly and Merseybeat published on different days to the major charts (even those majors did not all come out at the same date-e.g. Record Retailer published Thursdays, the others on Fridays) Merseybeat only aligned its date of publication with the Major papers on 2 January 1965. Pop Weekly even ran its charts a full week behind all others to 1964; unfortunately this makes these charts seem very out of step.

    Secondly charts for Top Pop / Music Now are scarce, particularly the Top Pop years (1968-69) so data is limited. No Newspaper/Music or sound Library; or the major colleges hold any Top Pops. What data I have comes from private collections-my own; and those of Jim McAlwane and Nigel Lees; who helped greatly in gathering these charts.

    The size of chart published varied as well. NME was a regular Top 30 through the 1960s. Record Retailer was a Top 50; as was the BMRB chart, which started on 15 February 1969. Melody Maker was a Top 50 from 15 September 1962 to 1 April 1967. From this date it became a published top 30, though a Top 50 was compiled. However, in September 1969, the new trade magazine, Music Business Weekly was allowed, from 20 September 1969, to publish the MM Top 50. This larger listing is referred to from 20 September 1969. The Disc chart was a Top 30 from 6 October 1962. It became a top 50 on 23 April 1966 when incorporating Music Echo; becoming Disc And Music Echo. It reverted back to a Top 30 on 1 April 1967. On 26 August 1967, Disc began using Melody Makers chart.

    For the `minor` charts; Pop Weekly was a Top 30 until November 1965 when it started running a Top 10 “Readers Poll”. Pop Weekly ceased on 12 February 1966. Merseybeat from April 1964, had a Top 20, which unusually; had no `last week figures`. On 3 December 1964; the chart became a Top 100. It reduced to a Top 50 on January 8 1966. The paper was incorporated into Disc, becoming Disc And Music Echo on 23 April 1966. The Top Pop / Music Now chart was a top 30 from its inception in May 1968, to May 1971.

    The Beatles EPs will be listed as they featured in every singles chart except Record Retailers. This is because the Record Retailer was publishing an EP chart and so not including them on the singles chart. Melody Maker also had an EP chart up to 25 May 1963. After this finished EPs could be listed in its singles charts.

    Long Players are also listed where they entered singles chart. Though it seems strange some charts would list LPs if sales were high enough! Only the Record Retailer and Melody Maker charts excluded LPs from their charts.

    First week of chart entry differed between charts. In particular `Please Please Me`, `From Me To You` and `She Loves You` varied greatly in their first week in each chart. One cause being, that both New Musical Express and Disc would accept `advance order` figures for their calculations; whereas Record Retailer and Melody Maker would only count actual `sales over the counter`. By the time of `I Want To Hold Your Hand` massive sales even over two days helped this and following releases to enter straight at No 1 in all charts except Record Retailers.

    The Record Retailer chart was compiled on a different day: Tuesday-as opposed to Monday which other charts were compiled. Though whether this was a major factor; is unsure. Placings will follow each records chart life until it leaves the respective chart. Positions will start from first week of entry in each chart until the week each record departs of each chart. Fulsome thanks are given to Dave McAleer; `Guinness Hit Singles / Albums` chart consultant; whose valued help with Record Retailer positions from 41 to 50 was vital. Dave Taylor and Trevor Ager very kindly supplied Pick Of The Pops chart statistics. As stated earlier Jim McAlwane and Nigel Lees greatly helped with Top Pops charts.

    There is a final section that compares Beatles weeks at number 1 in the national LP charts. It concentrates on first week of entry and weeks on top of each chart.

    Key to figures used.

    A horizontal date guide is displayed = 1/5. 8/5. 15/5. This is date (1=first) of the fifth (May) and so on. The chart compilers are on the vertical

    N.M.E (New Musical Express)

    R.R (Record Retailer)

    M.M (Melody Maker)

    D (Disc, later Disc And Music Echo)

    P.O.T.P (Pick Of The Pops)

    P.W (Pop Weekly)

    M / M.E (Merseybeat, later Music Echo)

    T.P / M.N (Top Pops later Music Now)

    A Dash - is displayed to indicate the opening chart position.
    Hash # is displayed to indicate a records temporary disappearance from a chart, before re-entering.
    An Asterix * is displayed to show a records final week in a chart.

    Occasionally a small j appears before a placing. This indicates the record was at a joint position in a chart.

    The figures C.R (Chart Repeated) are used in Record Retailers chart on 1st January 1966. This is because Record Retailer was not able to publish a chart on that date, so it repeated the previous weeks chart.

    The figures N.C (No Chart) are used in Melody Makers chart on 28th December 1963, 30th December 1967 and 27th December 1969. In the B.M.R.B chart they appear on 3rd January 1970. This signifies that No Chart was published on those dates.

    The} sign is used to show on 26th August 1967 the Disc chart merging with Melody Makers.
    The 1b figure for “Can’t Buy Me Love” on the 11th April 1964 entry on the Merseybeat chart, signifies that this date was the final Bi-weekly Merseybeat chart, covering the period 28th March to 11th April 1964.

    N.P = No Publication. Merseybeat was still only every two weeks, only becoming a weekly on 25th April 1964.


    The Full Singles, EPs and LP Chart Performances in New Musical Express, Record Retailer, Melody Maker, Disc (and Music Echo) Pop Weekly, Merseybeat / Music Echo Pick Of The Pops and Top Pops / Music Now.



    LOVE ME DO.

    `Love Me Do` had quite a varied chart life, depending which chart it entered. The record only enjoyed a solitary week at number 27 in the New Musical Express (NME) Top 30 on 27 October 1962. In the Melody Maker (MM) and Record Retailer (RR) Top 50s it enjoyed a longer chart life; peaking at no’s 21 and 17 respectively. The record had similar shorter runs in the Disc and Pop Weekly top 30’s achieving placing of 24 and 25. It was estimated to have sold around 100.000 by mid 1963.


    “Love Me Do” Chart Progress. LOVE ME DO.

    .

    In the New Musical Express Top 30 `Love Me Do` entered on 27 October 1962 at position 27 for just that week. It is something of a mystery why the record made no further appearance over the following weeks. One possible explanation is that the New Musical Express charts allowed both sides of records into its chart and over the period October 1962 to February 1963 records by Elvis Presley, Cliff Richard and Frank Ifield had both sides listed, leaving less room for other titles; particularly those from debuting acts such as The Beatles.

    The records progress in Melody Makers Top 50 was far smoother. It entered at position 48 on 27 October 1962 and progressed 40, 30, 28, 26, 26, 24, 24, 22 (no Chart on 29th December) 21, 21, 26, 34, 37, 41, 43. Peak position of 21 was on dates 5th and 12th January 1963. Melody Makers chart was on a sample of up to 120 shops in late 1962 early 1963; consequently its charts were much more stable than Record Retailers.

    In the Disc Top 30 it entered on 10 November at number 28. Following positions were 27, 27, 27, 24 and 26, before leaving the chart on 22 December 1962.

    This single issued on 5 October 1962 made its first appearance in Record Retailers Top 50 at position 49 on 13 October 1962. Its progress in this chart was erratic, moving to positions 46, 41, 32, 37, 29, 23, 21, 26, 19, 22, 17, 24, 17, 28, 37, 36 and 44. The two peaks of 17th position were on 29 December 1962 and 12 January 1963. It has been suggested that Brian Epstein purchasing extra copies had assisted the record, but no evidence of this has ever emerged. It was Record Retailers chart that was more to blame for volatile movements. The chart was still compiled at around just thirty phone calls to retailers (it would only increase at the start of 1964). Many records suffered erratic movements in the Record Retailer chart because of its small sample size

    On the Pick Of The Pops Top 30 it entered at number 29 on 17 November 1962. Following positions were, 26, 29, 26, 25, 28, 25, 24 and 24, before leaving the chart on 19 January 1963.

    In the Pop Weekly Top 30 `Love Me Do` entered on 1 December 1962 at number 29. Following positions were 27, 29, 25, 25, 26, 26 and 25, before dropping out of the chart on 26 January 1963.

    LOVE ME DO(1962-63)

    (1962) Date (1963)
    13/10. 20/10. 27/10. 3/11. 10/11. 17/11. 24/11. 1/12. 8/12. 15/12. 22/12. 29/12. 5/1

    N.M.E -27*

    M.M - 48 40 30 28 26 26 24 24 22 NC 21

    D - 28 27 27 27 24 26*

    R.R - 49 46 41 32 37 29 23 21 26 19 22 17 24

    P.O.T.P -29 26 29 26 25 28 25 25

    P.W -29 27 29 25 25 26

    LOVE ME DO Cont-

    (1963)
    12/1. 17/1. 24/1. 31/1. 7/2. 14/2:

    M.M 21 26 34 37 41 43*

    R.R 17 28 37 36 44*

    P.O.T.P 24*

    P.W 26 25*


    * * *

  • #2
    "Please Please Me" & "From Me To You" to follow soon!

    Comment


    • #3
      I said it would be soon!!

      PLEASE PLEASE ME.

      `Please Please Me` is the record that most right thinking and sensible people regard as the Beatles first national number 1. It achieved top position in the two most influential and influential charts of the era; the New Musical Express and Melody Maker listings. It also made number 1 in the Disc and Pop Weekly charts.

      Also not to be overlooked is its prime position (for three weeks) in the BBCs Pick Of The Pops Top 30. Had Top Of The Pops started one year earlier (1 Jan 1963, rather than 1 Jan 1964) the Beatles would have featured as the number 1 act on 23 February and 2 and 9 March. Both Pick and Top of The Pops were combined average charts, where the BBC used the New Musical Express, Melody Maker, Record Retailer and Disc charts to produce a weighted average listing. The Record Retailer chart where `Please Please Me` only made number 2 was of such minor importance then, it was not considered for use in the BBC calculations until March 1962. The record gained the group their first Silver Disc award from Disc Weekly selling just over 300,000 in 1963.

      “Please Please Me” Chart Progress.


      In the NME Top 30 it entered at 17 on 2 February 1963. It climbed to number 5 the following week, and number 3 the week after that. On 23 February 1963 the record was joint number 1 alongside Frank Ifields `The Wayward Wind` The next week of 2 March it solely occupied top position. Thereafter its positions were 2, 2, 4, 9, 13 and 22; before leaving the chart on 20 April 1963.

      In the Melody Maker chart the record entered at 47 on 19 January 1963. It climbed over the next few weeks to 39, 21, 9, 2 and 2. Finally on 2 March 1963 it attained the number 1 position, which it held on to the following week. The rest of its chart positions were 2, 4, 7, 13, 17, 23, 28, 41, 40, and 49; before leaving the Top 50 on 25 May 1963.

      The Disc chart debuted `Please Please Me` at position 9 on 2 February 1963. It then proceeded to 7 then 3. On 23 February 1963 it claimed the number 1 spot, which it held the next week. It then moved to 2, 2, 5, 7, 13, 20 and 28 before departing the chart on 27 April 1963.

      `Please Please Me` entered Record Retailers chart at position 45 on 19 January 1963. It rose to number 33 the following week, then to positions in the Top 50 of 16, 3, 3, 2, 2, 3, 2, 5, 7, 11, 17, 22, 30, 31, 41 and 42. It left the chart on 25 May 1963. It had failed to top the Record Retailer chart. At the time this was no real disappointment due to its achievements in the other charts; but when the compilers of the first edition of The Guinness Book Of Hit Singles chose the Record Retailer chart for 1960s data; the `myth` of `Please Please Me` being only a number 2 Record was born.


      On the Pick Of The Pops chart it entered at joint 16 on 2 February 1963. Following positions were 6, and 3 before reaching number 1 on 23 February. It held top spot for three weeks, sharing the third and last week with Cliff Richards `Summer Holiday`. Following positions were 2, 5, 7, 12, 19 and 24 before leaving the chart on 27 April 1963.

      The record entered the Pop Weekly chart at 16 on 9 February 1963. It moved to 4 and then 3, before topping the chart for the weeks of 2 and 9 March. It then proceeded to 2, 2, 5, 8, 11, 12 and 25; before leaving the chart on 4 May 1963.


      PLEASE PLEASE ME(1963)
      (1963)
      19/1. 26/1. 2/2. 9/2. 16/2. 23/2. 2/3. 9/3. 16/3. 23/3. 30/3. 6/4. 13/4. 20/4. 27/4. 4/5. 1/5.

      N.M.E -17 5 3 j1 1 2 2 4 9 13 22*

      M.M -47 39 21 9 2 2 1 1 2 4 7 13 17 23 28 41 40

      D -9 7 3 1 1 2 2 5 7 13 20 28*

      R.R -45 33 16 3 3 2 2 3 2 5 7 11 17 22 30 31 41

      P.O.T.P -j16 6 3 1 1 j1 2 5 7 12 19 24*

      P.W -16 4 3 1 1 2 2 5 8 11 12 25*

      PLEASE PLEASE ME Cont-

      (1963)

      18/5
      R.R 42*

      M.M 49*


      * * *


      FROM ME TO YOU.

      `From Me To You` the record considered by Guinness Hit Singles and it’s advocates as the Beatles first `official` number1 entered the various charts at wildly varying positions! The explanation is that both NME and Disc accepted Dealer orders from shops rather than actual `sales across the counter` which was the accepted method favoured by Melody Maker, Record Retailer and Merseybeat.

      Another complication was the day of compiling. New Musical Express, Disc and Melody Maker compiled their charts on a Monday; Record Retailer compiled its chart on a Tuesday. It changed to Mondays in July 1967. Pop Weekly and Merseybeat compiled theirs on Wednesdays.

      The sizes of samples (e.g. number of shops contacted) varied greatly. Melody Maker and New Musical Express, because of their vast financial and staff resources were by far the largest by the mid 1960s at well over 200 for Melody Maker, and 150 for New Musical Express. Disc attained a peak of 100 shops. Record Retailer was only 30 up to January 1964. From 1964, the Record Retailer chart sampled around 75 to 85 stores.

      Pop Weekly and Merseybeat were fairly small samples. Pop Weekly never got much more than 30 stores to contact; and by 27 November 1965, changed to a `readers write in` popularity poll. Merseybeat when it ran a Top 20 barely sampled a dozen shops, mostly in England North West. When financial input came via Brian Epstein late in 1964, the paper produces the country’s largest published chart; a top 100. To achieve this, the sample of shops increased to around 50 to 60. The Top Pops chart of the late sixties was compiled from phone calls to a Dozen branches of WH Smith & Son as the paper had an advertising agreement with Smith’s. When the paper became Music Now in March 1970 the sample increased to around 40 to 50 stores.

      `From Me To You` enjoyed its longest reign at number1 in the Record Retailer chart (seven Weeks) due to the Record Retailer chart being the only listing not to have he Beatles make way for Billy J. Kramers own version of the groups `Do You Want To Know A Secret?’ `From Me To You` sold well over 600,000 units in 1963.


      “From Me To You” Chart Progress.


      In the NME chart it entered at 6 on 20 April 1963 making the top spot the following week of 27 April. It occupied the number 1 spot for six weeks, though the sixth and last week was as a joint number 1 with Billy J. Kramer with `Do You want to Know A Secret?` `From Me To You` dropped to number 2 on 8 June. Positions then were 3, 5, 6, 7, 15, 15, 18 and 27 before departing the chart on 10 August 1963.

      In the Melody Maker chart it entered at 19 on 20 April. It rose to number 3 the next week and hit number 1 on 4 May, where it stayed for six weeks. It dropped to number 3 on 15 June. It proceeded to 3, 5, 8, 12, 16, 16, 19, 24, 28, 35 and 43 before leaving the chart on 7 September 1963.

      In the Disc chart it entered at 10 on 20 April 1963 and rose to number 2 the following week. It attained number 1 the next week of 4 May staying there for five weeks. It dropped to number 2 on 8 June, moving to 4, 3, 6, 6, 14, 16, 18, 23 and 28 before leaving the chart on 17 August 1963.

      `From Me To You` entered the Record Retailer chart on 20 April at 23. It rose to number 3 the following week; and hit number 1 on 4 May 1963. It stayed top for seven weeks falling to number 2 on 22 June. It proceeded to 4, 8, 13, 16, 15, 17, 20, 27, 37, 41 and 44, before leaving the chart on 14 September 1963.


      On the Pick Of The Pops chart it entered at 15 on 20 April 1963. It rose to number 2 the next week, then reached number 1 on 4 May where it stayed for six weeks. The sixth and final week top was shared with Billy J. Kramer’s `Do You Want To Know A Secret? ` `From Me To You` fell to number 3 on 15 June. Following positions were 3, 5, 8, 14, 16, 16, 21, 24 and 29 before departing the chart on 24 August 1963.

      On the Pop Weekly chart it entered at position 27 on 27 April 1963. It rose to number 2 the following week; reaching number 1 on 11 May for four weeks. It fell to No 3 on 8 June; proceeding to 2, 2, 3, 5, 7, 15, 15, 14, 16, 27 and 28; before leaving the chart on 31 August 1963.

      FROM ME TO YOU(1963)

      (1963)
      20/4. 27/4. 4/5. 11/5. 18/5. 25/5. 1/6. 8/6. 15/6. 22/6. 29/6. 6/7. 13/7. 20/7. 27/7. 3/8.

      N.M.E -6 1 1 1 1 1 j1 2 3 5 6 7 15 15 18 27*

      M.M -19 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 5 8 12 16 16 19

      D -10 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 4 3 6 6 14 16 18 23

      R.R -23 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 4 8 13 16 15 17

      P.O.T.P -15 2 1 1 1 1 1 j1 3 3 5 8 14 16 16 21

      P.W -27 2 1 1 1 1 3 2 2 3 5 7 15 15 14


      FROM ME TO YOU Cont-

      (1963)
      10/8. 17/8. 24/8. 31/8. 7/9.

      M.M 24 28 35 43*

      D 28*

      R.R 20 27 37 41 44*

      P.O.T.P. 24 29*

      P.W 16 27 28*


      * * *

      Comment


      • #4
        And Now!!

        TWIST AND SHOUT (E.P)

        The `Twist and Shout` EP still holds the record even today (2008) for best selling record in the Extended Play form; at some 800,000 units sold. Only the Record Retailer singles chart did not include it in the listing, as that paper was still running a separate EP chart, in which `Twist and Shout` was at number 1 for 21 weeks on two spells at the top.

        In the other charts it had an initial very successful run in each Top 10, doing best in the Melody Maker Top 50, reaching number 2 behind `Sweets For My Sweet` by The Searchers. Sales tailed off for a few weeks by early autumn, but with the upsurge in `Beatlemania after the group’s Royal Variety performance Twist and Shout`, along with other Beatles Discs, enjoyed a renewed chart life.

        The record climbed back into each chart, achieving its best second peak of 11th position on 7 December 1963 in the Melody Maker chart. Because Melody Maker was running a Top 50 chart at that juncture `Twist and Shout` clocked up an impressive 32 weeks in the chart; 33 if the 28 December date is included, when Melody Maker did not compile a Christmas chart that year.

        “Twist and Shout” Chart Progress.


        In the NME chart it entered at position 14 on 20 July 1963. Following positions were, 8, 6, 4, 4, 5, joint 10, 13, 15, 19, before leaving the chart on 28 September 1963. It re-entered on 23 November 1963 at No 29. Following positions were 16, 15, joint 12, 14, 13, 17, 16, 24 and 30, before finally leaving the chart on 1 February 1964.

        In the Melody Maker singles chart it enjoyed a long run. It entered on 27t July 1963 at 14; its following positions were 6 and 4, before peaking at No 2 on 17 August behind the Searchers `Sweets For My Sweet.` It then proceeded to 3, 4, 9, 12, 11, 20, 29, 31, 33, 38 and 38 on 2 November 1963. It began to rise again the following week, proceeding to 32, 25, 15, 14, 11, 12 and 13. There was no chart on 28 December, so the following week beginning 4 January 1964, positions were 16, 19, 23, 23, 30, 39, 39, 49 and 48; before finally leaving the chart on 7 March 1964; a run of 32 consecutive weeks.

        In the Disc chart the EP entered on 20 July 1963 at position 17. It then went to 9, 5, 3, 3, 4, 7, 11, 13, 15, 24, 26 and 30 before leaving the chart on 19 October 1963. It re-entered on 23 November 1963 at No 21. Following positions were, 17, 16, 12, 12, 13, 13, 20, 24, 28, and 28, before finally leaving the chart on 8 February 1964.

        The `Twist and Shout` EP had no placing in the Record Retailer chart as Record Retailer was still running an EP (Extended Play) chart where 1Twist and Shout1 spent 21 weeks at No 1.

        In the Pick Of The Pops chart it entered at 22 on 20 July 1963. Following positions were 14, 5, 3, 4, 6, 12, 14, 15, 25 and 30. It left the chart on 12 October 1963, a gap of six weeks before re-entering at 21 on 23 November 1963. Following positions were 15, 14, 12, 12, 13, 16, 19, 23 and 27 before finally leaving the chart on 1 February 1964.

        In the Pop Weekly Chart it entered on 27 July 1963 at 22. Following Positions were, 18, 8, 9, 4, 6, 12, 15, 22 and 19, before leaving the chart on 5 October 1963. It re-entered on 7 December 1963 at joint number 24. It dropped out the following week, only to re-appear at 23 on 21 December. Positions thereafter were, 27, and 26, before falling from the chart again for the week of 11 January 1964. It re-entered at joint number 21 on 18 January, falling to 29 on the 25 January. The next week of 1 February 1964, the record left the chart for the final time.





        TWIST AND SHOUT EP(1963-64)

        (1963)
        20/7. 27/7. 3/8. 10/8. 17/8. 24/8. 31/8. 7/9. 14/9. 21/9. 28/9. 5/10. 12/10. 19/10. 26/10.

        N.M.E -13 8 6 4 4 5 j10 13 15 19 # # # # #

        M.M -14 6 4 2 3 4 9 12 11 20 29 31 33 38

        D -17 9 5 3 3 4 7 11 13 15 24 26 30 # #

        P.O.T.P -22 14 5 4 3 4 6 12 14 15 25 30 # # #

        P.W -22 18 8 9 4 6 12 15 22 19 # # # #

        TWIST AND SHOUT EP Cont-
        (1963) (1964)
        2/11. 9/11. 16/11. 23/11. 30/11. 7/12. 14/12. 21/12. 28/12. 4/1. 11/1. 18/1. 25/1. 1/2.

        N.M.E # # # 29 16 15 j12 14 13 17 16 24 30*

        M.M 38 32 25 15 14 11 12 13 NC 16 19 23 23 30

        D # # # # 21 17 16 12 13 13 20 24 28 28*

        P.O.T.P # # # 21 15 14 12 12 13 16 19 23 27*

        P.W # j24 # 23 27 26 # j21 29*

        TWIST AND SHOUT EP Cont-

        (1964)
        8/2. 15/2. 22/2. 29/2.

        M.M 39 39 49 48*


        * * *



        SHE LOVES YOU.

        `She Loves You` was the record to really ignite `Beatlemania`. It enjoyed a tremendous chart life in all the national record charts. Due to the New Musical Express and Disc charts accepting dealers `advance order` figures in their chart compiling, the record entered at very high positions in both: 2 and 3 respectively. The Pop Weekly figure looks initially confusing; but due to the fact that its chart took up to six days from assembly to publication, means it was basically a full week behind on its publication date.

        As this article has to stick to publication dates for the sake of consistency, this does look very out of step. Pop Weekly amended the large discrepancy by November 1963, when the gap between compilation and publication was only three days. `She Loves You` achieved the incredible feat of regaining the coveted number 1 position in every chart at the 23-30 November 1963 dates. The surge of Beatlemania in the late autumn to New Year period was fuelling massive singles sales, unprecedented in the Record Trade.

        The record fared best in the Melody Maker chart in weeks at number 1, with an initial five week stay top, followed by regaining number1 for the last two weeks of November 1963; a total of seven weeks at number1; the longest at number 1 for a Beatles single in the Melody Maker chart.Its longest chart run was in the Record Retailer Top 50, achieving 33 weeks chart residence, 32 of them consecutive.

        `She Loves You` is today the best ever selling Beatles single in the UK, with sales over 1.800.000. `She Loves You` was 1963’s largest selling single, earning the group their first Gold disc, closely followed by `I want To Hold Your Hand`. Both were just over 1.500.000 by years end. Both continued selling through the 1960s. They were pushed very close for best ever selling British single, by of all things, Ken Dodd’s 1965 hit,`Tears`. That record also passed the 1.500.000 figure by early 1966. According to the 1978 edition of Joseph Murrel’s Book of Golden Discs; `Tears` sold 1.600.000 by August 1966. If that is correct, it pushed `She Loves You` and `I Want To Hold Your Hand` very close.


        “She Loves You” Chart Progress.


        In the New Musical Express chart it entered at 2 on 31 August 1963. It made number 1 the following week for four week tenure before dropping to number 2 on 5 October 1963. Further positions were 3, 4, 3, 2, 2, and 2, before regaining number 1 on 23 November. It held top spot for a second week before `I Want To Hold Your Hand` pushed it to number 2. `She Loves You` positions thereafter, were 2, 2, joint number 2, 4, 3, 6, 7, 14, 18 and 29, before leaving the chart on 15 February 1964.

        In the Melody Maker chart `She Loves You` also entered at 12 on 31 August 1963. The following week of 7 September it leapt up to number 1 for a five week stay. It fell to number 3 on 12 October 1963. It then listed at 4, 3, 3, 2, 2 before regaining number 1 position on 23 November 1963. It stayed a second week before being pushed to number 2 by `I Want To Hold Your Hand` `She Loves You` then went to number 2 for two weeks. There was no Melody Maker chart on 28 December 1963; the following week of 4 January 1964 `She Loves You` appeared at number 3. Following positions were 6, 7, 10, 13, 22, 26, 27, 33, 38, 40, 46, 47 and 47 again, before leaving the chart on 11 April 1964.

        In the Disc chart the record entered at 3 on 31 August 1963. It took top position the following week for a four week stay, dropping to number 2 on 5 October 1963. It then went 2, 3, 4, 3, 3, 3 and 2, before regaining number 1 on 30 November for one week. The following week it was displaced by `I Want To Hold Your Hand` and positions were from 7 December 1963, 2, 2, 2, 2, 3, 6, 8, 13, 15, 25, 29 and 30, before dropping from the chart on 29 February 1964.

        She Loves You` entered the Record Retailer chart 12 on 31 August 1963. It rose to number 3 the following week, before hitting number 1 the next week of 14 September 1963 for four weeks, before dropping to number 3 on 12 October 1963. Following positions were, 3, 3, 2, 2, 3 and 2, before it regained the top spot on 30 November 1963. It held on to this for the next week, and on 14 December it was again pushed to number 2 by the Beatles own follow up `I Want To hold Your Hand`. `She Loves You` listed at 2, 2, 3, 5, 5, 8, 16, 19, 21, 23, 28, 33, 35, 42 and 48 before dropping from chart for the week of 4 April 1964. It re-entered on 11 April at number 42, falling to number 47 the next week, and finally departing the chart on 25 April 1964.

        In the Pick Of The Pops chart it entered at 7 on 31 August 1963. It hit number 1 the following week of 7 September 1963 for five weeks; the fifth week sharing with Brian Poole And The Tremeloes `Do You Love Me`. Following positions were 3, 3, 3, joint 2, 2, 2, 2. It regained number 1 jointly alongside Gerry And The Pacemakers `You’ll Never Walk Alone` on 23 November 1963. A further two weeks at number 1 were enjoyed before `She Loves You` fell to number 2 on 14 December 1963. Following positions were 2, 2, 2, 3, 6, 7, 13, 15, 23, 28 and 27 before departing the chart on 29 February 1964.

        In the Pop Weekly chart `She Loves You` entered at 4 on 7 September 1963. It rose to number 2 the following week, attaining number 1 on 21 September 1963, where it held a three week residence. It fell to number 2 on 12 October 1963. Following positions were, 3, 3, 3, 2, 2, and joint number 2, before it regained the number 1 position on 30 November 1963 for one week. Again knocked to number 2 on 7 December by `I Want To Hold Your Hand`, positions thereafter, were, 2, 2, 4, 6, 3, 6, 6, 11, 15, 23, 27 and joint number 27, before leaving the chart on 25 April 1964.


        SHE LOVES YOU(1963-64)

        (1963)
        31/8. 7/9. 14/9. 21/9. 28/9. 5/10. 12/10. 19/10. 26/10. 2/11. 9/11. 16/11. 23/11. 30/11.

        N.M.E -2 1 1 1 1 2 3 4 3 2 2 2 1 1


        M.M -12 1 1 1 1 1 3 4 3 3 2 2 1 1

        D -3 1 1 1 1 2 2 3 4 3 3 3 2 1

        R.R -12 3 1 1 1 1 3 3 3 2 2 3 2 1

        P.O.T.P -7 1 1 1 1 j1 3 3 3 j2 2 2 j1 1

        P.W -4 2 1 1 1 2 3 3 3 2 2 2 1


        SHE LOVES YOU Cont-

        (1963) (1964)
        7/12. 14/12. 21/12. 28/12. 4/1. 11/1. 18/1. 25/1. 1/2. 8/2. 15/2. 22/2. 29/2. 7/3. 14/3.

        N.M.E 2 2 j2 4 3 6 7 14 18 29*

        M.M 2 2 2 NC 3 6 7 10 13 22 26 27 33 38 40

        D 2 2 2 2 3 6 8 13 15 25 29 30*

        R.R 1 2 2 2 3 5 5 8 16 19 21 23 28 33 35

        P.O.T.P 1 2 2 2 3 6 7 13 15 23 28 27*

        P.W 2 2 j2 4 6 3 6 6 11 15 23 27 j27*

        SHE LOVES YOU Cont-

        (1964)
        21/3. 28/3. 4/4. 11/4. 18/4.

        M.M 46 47 47*

        R.R 42 48 # 42 47*

        * * *



        THE BEATLES HITS (EP).

        The `Beatles Hits` EP enjoyed a good run in the Melody Maker, New Musical Express and Disc charts. Only in the Pop Weekly chart did it fail to broach the top 20.

        “Beatles Hits” E.P. Chart Progress.

        In the New Musical Express chart it entered at 30 on 9 November1963. It departed the following week, before re-appearing at number 30 on 23 November. Again it fell from the chart for a week, appearing again on 7 December at number 19. The record then continued its chart life at joint number 17, 20, 20, 19 and 22 before leaving the chart on 18 January 1964.

        `Beatles Hits` EP Entered the Melody Maker chart at position 44 on 28 September 1963. It proceeded to 37, 29, 31, 35, 31, 23, 24, 18, 15, 17, 14, and 17. There was no chart on 28 December 1963, so the next position was at number 24 on 4 January 1964. Positions then were, 20, 28, 33 and 47, before leaving the chart on 8 February 1964.

        In the Disc chart it entered at 29 on 28 September 1963. Following positions were, 27, 27 and 28, before dropping from the chart on 26 October 1963. It re-entered at number 23 on 23 November 1963. Following positions were, 20, 17, 17, 16, 16, 17, 24 and 29, before leaving the chart on 25 January 1964.

        On the Pick Of The Pops chart it entered at position 25 on 9 November 1963. Following positions were 25, 24, 21, 17, 17, 18, 21, 20, 22 and 30 before leaving the chart on 25 January 1964.

        In the Pop Weekly chart, it entered at joint number 26 on 14 December 1963. Following positions were, 29, 29, 28, 22 and 26, before leaving the chart on 25 January 1964.



        BEATLES HITS EP (1963-64)

        (1963)
        28/9. 5/10. 12/10. 19/10. 26/10. 2/11. 9/11. 16/11. 23/11. 30/11. 7/12.14/12. 21/12.

        N.M.E -j30 # 30 # 19 j17 20

        M.M -44 37 29 31 35 31 23 24 18 15 17 14 17

        D -29 27 27 28 # # # # # 23 20 17 17

        P.O.T.P -25 25 24 21 17 17 18

        P.W - j26 29

        BEATLES HITS EP Cont-

        (1963) (1964)
        28/12. 4/1. 11/1. 18/1. 25/1. 1/2.

        N.M.E 20 19 22*

        M.M NC 24 20 28 33 47*

        D 16 17 24 29*

        P.O.T.P 21 20 22 30*

        P.W 29 28 22 26*


        * * *


        THE BEATLES No1 (E.P).

        The `Beatles No1` EP only entered the Pop weekly chart for a single week at position 30 on 30 November 1963. It only spent five weeks in the NME Top 30. Reaching number 24; on 23 November. In the Melody Maker and Disc charts it reached 19th and 18th place respectively.

        “Beatles No1”EP. Chart Progress.


        `Beatles No 1` EP entered the New Musical Express chart on 16 November 1963 at position 27. Following positions were, 24 and 26, before dropping out on the week of 7 December 1963. It re-entered at number 29 for the week of 14 December, departing the chart again the following week of the 21 December 1963. On 4 January 1964, it entered one last time at number 29. On 11 January 1964, it finally departed.

        `Beatles No1`EP entered the Melody Maker chart on 9 November 1963 at 40. Positions as follows were, 27, 22, 21, 19, 23 and 25. There was no chart on 28 December 1963, so the next chart position was on 4 January 1964 at number 31. Following positions were, 29, 38, 46 and 48, before leaving the chart on 8 February 1964.

        In the Disc chart it entered at 24 on 9 November 1963. Following positions were, 21, 18, 21, 26, 29 and 26, before leaving the chart on 28 December 1963.

        In the Pick Of The Pops chart it entered at 20 on 23 November 1963. Following positions were 22, 27, 30 and joint number 29, before leaving the chart on 28 December 1963.

        In the Pop Weekly chart, it just made a single entry at 30, on 30 November 1963.


        BEATLES No1 EP (1963-64)

        (1963) (1964)
        9/11. 16/11. 23/11. 30/11. 7/12. 14/12. 21/12. 28/12. 4/1. 11/1. 18/1. 25/1. 1/2.

        N.M.E -27 24 26 # 29 # # 29*

        M.M -40 27 22 21 19 23 25 NC 31 29 38 46 48*

        D -24 21 18 21 26 29*

        P.O.T.P -20 22 27 30 j29

        P.W -30*
        * * *




        WITH THE BEATLES LP

        The With The Beatles LP was the first British LP to sell one million copies in the UK alone. It reached the million sale in early 1965. Only one other LP had achieved a million sales in the UK, this was the soundtrack to South Pacific which passed the million sales in 1963.



        With The Beatles LP Chart Progress.

        In the New Musical Express chart the LP entered at 15 on 30 November 1963. Following positions were 11, 14, 17, 15, 20 and joint number 20, before leaving the chart on 18 January 1964.

        On the Disc chart it entered at 14 on 30 November 1963. Following positions were 11, 13, 15, 17, 9, and 26, before departing the chart on 18 January 1964.

        On the Pick Of The Pops chart it entered at 14 on 30 November 1963. Following positions were 11, 13, 16, 15, 14 and 24, before leaving the chart on 18 January 1964.

        In the Pop Weekly chart it entered at joint number 22 on 7 December 1963. It dropped from the chart the next week of 14 December 1963, the re-entered at 24 on the following week of 21 December. Following positions were 22, 22, 23 and 25, before leaving the chart on 25 January 1964.


        WITH THE BEATLES LP (1963-64)

        (1963) (1964)
        30/11. 7/12. 14/12. 21/12. 28/12. 4/1. 11/1. 18/1. 25/1.

        N.M.E -15 11 14 17 15 20 j20*

        D -14 11 13 15 17 9 26*

        P.O.T.P -14 11 13 16 15 14 24*

        P.W j22 # 24 22 22 23 25*





        * * * *

        I WANT TO HOLD YOUR HAND.

        The record which swept any American resistance completely aside; `I Want To Hold Your Hand` became the first Beatles record to achieve, what was the extremely rare feat then of entering straight at number 1 in all charts but one. Only the Record Retailer chart, which Guinness Hit singles / Albums refer to, ignores this fact; entering it at the surprisingly low position of 10.

        However; the Record Retailer chart in December 1963 was still based on just 30 calls to shops. The Melody Maker chart was around 150 by then. New Musical Express was almost at this figure and Disc was surveying around 70 to 80. Even the Pop Weekly chart, whose sample was on a par with the Record Retailer survey, at 25 to 30, entered the record straight at No1.


        `I Want To Hold Your Hand` also failed to instantly head the BBC Pick Of The Pops Top 30 as the Pick Of The Pops chart included Record Retailer figures. The relatively low entry of number 10 in the Retailer chart brought the first week of entry in the Pick Of The Pops chart down to joint number two.

        Derek Chinnery who compiled the Pick Of The Pops chart decided that the Record Retailer chart was so badly out of step with all other charts that he would put future Beatles records as straight number 1 entry’s in the Pick Of The Pops chart no matter what the first week of entry was in the Record Retailer listings. Only when other charts stopped entering Beatles records as straight number 1 entry’s did he halt this procedure!

        The record achieved its longest stay on top in the Pop Weekly chart at seven weeks. In the major charts, it did best in the NME listing, holding prime place for six weeks. Another million plus seller, it won the group their second Gold disc.



        “I Want To Hold Your Hand” Chart Progress.

        In the New Musical Express chart the record entered straight at number 1 on 7 December 1963 for a six week run. It fell to number 3 on 18 January 1964. Further positions were 3, 6, and 10. Joint No 16, 20, 24, and 28, before leaving the chart on 7 March 1964.

        In the Melody Maker chart it entered straight at number 1 for a five week run on 7 December 1963, dropping to number 2 on 11 January 1964. Further positions were 2, 3, 6, 9, 14, 15, 20, 25, 29, 31, 37, 38 and 45, before departing the chart on 18 April 1964.


        In the Disc chart the record entered straight at number 1 on 7 December 1963 for a five week run, dropping to number 2 on 11 January 1964. Further positions were 3, 3, 6, 11, 15, 17, 26, 29 and 30 before dropping from the chart on 21 March 1964.

        `I Want To Hold Your Hand` Entered the Record Retailer chart at 10 on 7 December 1963. It rose to number 1 the following week for a five week stay, dropping to number 2 on 18 January 1964. Its following chart positions were 3, 6, 7, 15, 15, 17, 25, 24, 25, 32, 42, 40, 48 and 50 before departing the chart on 2 May 1964. It re-entered at number 48 on 16 May for one more weeks stay, before final departure on 23 May 1964.

        In the Pick Of The Pops chart it entered at joint number 2 on 7 December 1963, reaching number 1 the following week of 14 December for a five week stay on top. The fifth and final week top on 11 January 1964 was shared with the Dave Clark Five’s `Glad All Over`. `I Want To Hold Your Hand` fell to joint number two the following week of 18 January 1964. Following positions were, 3, 6, 10, 15, 18, 22, 27 and 29 before leaving the chart on 21 March 1964.

        In the Pop Weekly chart the record entered straight at number 1 on 7 December 1963 for a seven week stay. It fell to number 3 on 25 January 1964. Further positions were 3, 6, 9, 15, 17, 19, 26, joint number 25, 28 and 30; before departing the chart on 11 April 1964.




        I WANT TO HOLD YOUR HAND(1963-64)

        (1963) (1964)
        7/12. 14/12. 21/12. 28/12. 4/1. 11/1. 18/1. 25/1. 1/2. 8/2. 15/2. 22/2. 29/2. 7/3. 14/3. 21/3

        N.M.E -1 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 6 10 j16 20 24 28*

        M.M -1 1 1 1 1 2 2 3 6 9 14 15 20 25 29 31

        D -1 1 1 1 1 2 3 3 6 11 15 17 26 29*

        R.R -10 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 6 7 15 15 17 25 24 25

        P.O.T.P -j2 1 1 1 1 j1 j2 3 6 10 15 18 22 27 29*

        P.W -1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 6 9 15 17 19 26 j25


        I WANT TO HOLD YOUR HAND Cont-

        (1964)
        28/3. 4/4. 11/4. 18/4. 25/4. 2/5. 9/5. 16/5.

        M.M 37 38 45*

        R.R 32 42 40 48 50 # # 48*

        P.W 28 30*


        * * *

        Comment


        • #5
          And there's more!

          ALL MY LOVING EP.

          The `All My Loving` EP reached well into all charts, bar the Pop Weekly Top 20. Faring best in the Disc Top 30 reaching position 11 on 29 February 1964. Again in the Pop Weekly chart it barely got above 20, reaching number 19 on 29 February.

          “All My Loving” Chart Progress.


          It entered the New Musical Express chart at joint number 18 on 8 February 1964. Positions thereafter were, 15, 13, 21, 22, 24 and 29, before leaving the chart on 28 March 1964.

          The `All My Loving` EP entered the Melody Maker chart on 8 February 1964, at 42. Positions thereafter were, 20, 13, 12, 16, 19, 20, 24, 23, 28, 33 and 38, before leaving the chart on 2 May 1964.

          In the Disc chart it entered at 24 on 8 February 1964. Positions thereafter were 17, 14, 11, 14, 17, 21, 23, 27 and 27 again, before leaving the chart on 18 March 1964.

          It entered the Pick Of The Pops chart at 28 on 8 February 1964. Following positions were, 16, 14, 14, 16, 20, 21, 25, 26 and 30 before leaving the chart on 28 March 1964.

          In the Pop Weekly chart, it entered at 24 on 15 February 1964. Positions thereafter were, 22, 19, 26, 25 and joint No 25, before leaving the chart on 28 March 1964.


          ALL MY LOVING EP (1964)

          (1964)
          8/2. 15/2. 22/2. 29/2. 7/3. 14/3. 21/3. 28/3. 4/4. 11/4. 18/4. 25/4.

          N.M.E -j18 15 13 21 22 24 29*

          M.M -42 20 13 12 16 19 20 24 23 28 33 38*

          D -24 17 14 11 14 18 21 23 27 27*

          P.O.T.P -28 16 14 14 16 20 21 25 26 30*

          P.W -24 22 19 26 25 j25*



          * * *





          CAN’T BUY ME LOVE.

          `Can’t Buy Me Love` with over a million copies sold in its first week of release, made instant number1 in all charts bar Record Retailers; where it entered at number 8. Though Record Retailer was sampling more shops (75 to 85) by 1964; `Can’t Buy Me Love` still did not enter its top 50 at number 1.

          It spent longer at number 1 in the NME and Pop Weekly charts (four weeks top in both). The Merseybeat paper was changing from bi-weekly publication to weekly. Its date of publication was a couple of days out from the other papers, hence the seemingly one week behind of its listings.

          As can be seen by this time; Beatles records were selling hugely in their first couple of weeks on release, before tailing off fairly quickly-hence a shorter chart life. This was something John Lennon worried about on occasion-if fans bought a million in one week, how could their records stay around for long! Even so, `Can’t Buy Me love` sold well over 1,350,000 in 1964, becoming the years biggest selling single, gaining the group a third consecutive Gold disc for a single. It has now sold today, over 1,500,000.


          “Can’t Buy Me Love” Chart Progress.


          In the New Musical Express chart it entered straight at number 1 on 28 March 1964 for a four week stay on top. It fell to joint number 3 on 25 April 1964. Following positions were 5, 7, 22 and 24, before leaving the chart on 30 May 1964.

          In the Melody Maker chart it entered straight at number 1 on 28 March 1964 for a run of three weeks. It fell to number 2 on 18 April 1964. Following positions were 3, 5, 9, 14, 19, 25, 28, 34, 43 and 47 before departing the chart on 4 July 1964.

          In the Disc chart it entered straight at number 1 on 28 March 1964 for a three week stay, falling to number 3 on 18 April 1964. Following positions were 3, 5, 7, 13, 17 and 24, before leaving the chart on 6 June 1964.

          `Can’t Buy Me Love` entered the Record Retailer chart 8 on 28 March 1964. It rose to number 1 the following week for three weeks. It fell to number 2 on 25 April 1964; following positions were 4, 7, 13, 15, 22, 25, 30, 38, and 44, before departing the chart on 4 July 1964. It re-entered at number 47 on 11 July, for one more week, before finally leaving the chart on 18 July 1964.

          In the Pick Of The Pops chart it entered straight at number 1 on 28 March 1964 for a three week stay on top. It fell to number 2 on 18 April 1964. Following positions were 3, 5, 7, 13, 18, 24, 28.

          In Pop Weekly chart it entered straight at number 1 on 28 March 1964 for a four week run. It fell to number 2 on 25 April 1964. Following positions were, 3, 5, 7, 7, 20, 23 and 27, before leaving the chart on 20 June 1964.

          In the Merseybeat Top 20, the record entered at number 1, in what was that chart’s final bi-weekly publication of 11 March 1964. Two weeks later, the paper became a weekly, with `Can’t Buy Me Love` still top. An estimate for what the number 1 position, if a 18 March 1964 chart had existed, gives `Can’t Buy Me Love` number 1 spot, as it is most unlikely the record would have been overtaken between 11 and 25 March 1964. The record fell to number 2 on 2 May 1964 after (including estimate) three weeks at number 1. Following positions were, 3, 15, 11 and 16, before leaving the chart on 6 June 1964.


          CAN’T BUY ME LOVE (1964)

          (1964)
          28/3. 4/4. 11/4. 18/4. 25/4. 2/5. 9/5. 16/5. 23/5. 30/5. 6/6. 13/6. 20/6. 27/6. 4/7. 11/7.

          N.M.E -1 1 1 1 j3 5 7 22 24*

          M.M -1 1 1 2 3 5 9 14 19 25 28 34 43 47*

          D -1 1 1 3 3 5 7 13 17 21*

          R.R -8 1 1 1 2 4 7 13 15 22 25 30 38 44 # 47*

          P.O.T.P -1 1 1 2 3 5 7 13 18 24 28*

          P.W -1 1 1 1 2 3 5 7 7 20 23 27*

          M/M.E -1b N.P 1 2 3 15 11 16*



          * * *


          AIN’T SHE SWEET.

          Because of the Beatles extraordinary popularity record companies began desperately scrabbling for any connection with them for possible release. Polydor records realised they had rights, via their German company, to a primitive recording of the old standard `Ain’t She Sweet` Neither Brian Epstein or the group were happy with this, but could not stop the release. Predictably the record did rather better in the Merseybeat Top 20, hitting number 16 on 27 June 1964. The other charts registered it in the mid-20s.

          “Ain’t She Sweet”Chart Progress.

          `Ain’t She Sweet entered the New Musical Express chart on 6 June 1964 at number 27. It climbed to 24 the following week, before falling out of the chart the week after. It re-entered, for a final week at number 29 on 27 June 1964.

          In the Melody Maker chart, it entered at 36 on 13 June 1964. Following positions were, 27, 24, 28, 33 and 47, before leaving the chart on 25 July 1964.
          It entered the Disc chart at 30, on 6 June 1964. Following positions were, 25, 24, 26 and 28, before leaving the chart on 11 July 1964.

          In the Record Retailer chart it entered at 29 on 20 June 1964. Following positions were 30, 29 and 29, before leaving the chart on 18 July 1964.

          In the Pick Of The Pops chart it entered at 27 on 13 June 1964. Following positions were 27, 28 and 29 before leaving the chart on 11 July 1964.

          In the Pop Weekly chart, it made a sole entry at number 25 on 20 June 1964.

          In the Merseybeat chart it entered at 19 on 13 June 1964. Following positions were, 17, 16 and 17 before dropping from the chart for the week of 4 July 1964. It re-entered at number 20 on 18 July 1964, finally leaving the chart the following week of 25 July 1964.


          `AIN’T SHE SWEET(1964)


          (1964)
          6/6. 13/6. 20/6. 27/6. 4/7. 11/7. 18/7.

          N.M.E -27 24 # 29*

          M.M -36 27 24 28 33 47*

          D -30 25 24 26 28*

          R.R -29 30 29 29*

          P.O.T.P -27 27 28 29*

          P.W -25*

          M/M.E -19 17 16 17 # 20*



          * * *


          LONG TALL SALLY (E.P).

          The `Long Tall Sally` EP was the first Beatles EP to contain songs not already on LP. This helped its progress in the charts, peaking just outside the Top 10 in the major charts. In the Merseybeat Top 20, it entered straight at number 1 on 11 July 1964. The EP enjoyed its longest run in the Melody Maker Top 50, managing a 13 week stay.


          “Long Tall Sally” Chart Progress.
          In the New Musical Express chart it entered at 13 on 4 July 1964. Positions thereafter were, 11, 14, 18, joint number 20, and 27, before leaving the chart on 15 August 1964.

          The `Long Tall Sally` EP entered the Melody Maker chart at 20 on 4 July 1964. Following positions were, 15, 14, 17, 22, 25, 27, 30, 35, 44, 39, 47 and 49; before leaving the chart on 3 October 1964.

          In the Disc chart it entered at position 13 on 4 July 1964. Following positions were, 11, 14, 12, 15, 19 and 28, before leaving the chart on 22 August 1964.

          In the Pick Of The Pops chart it entered at 17 on 4 July 1964. Following positions were 12, 15, 17, 19, 24 and 30, before departing the chart on 22 August 1964.

          In the Pop Weekly chart it entered at 20 on 11 April 1964. Following positions were 22, 17, 18, 18 and 29, before leaving the chart on 22 August 1964.

          In the Merseybeat Top 20 chart, it was a straight entry at number 1 on 9 July 1964 for just that week .Following positions were, 5, 12, 12, 12 and 16, before leaving the chart on 22 August 1964.


          LONG TALL SALLY EP(1964)

          (1964)
          4/7. 11/7. 18/7. 25/7. 1/8. 8/8. 15/8. 22/8. 29/8. 5/9. 12/9. 19/9. 26/9.

          N.M.E -13 11 14 18 j20 27*

          M.M -20 15 14 17 22 25 27 30 35 44 39 47 49*

          D -13 11 14 12 15 19 28*

          P.O.T.P -17 12 15 17 19 24 30*

          P.W -20 22 17 18 18 29*

          M/ME -1 5 12 12 12 16*


          * * *










          A HARD DAYS NIGHT.

          `A Hard Day’s Night` broke the run of consecutive million sellers for the group. This was probably because many fans knew it would be on the forthcoming similarly titled LP. Nevertheless it still sold around 900,000 copies, managing five weeks number1 on the Pop Weekly Top 30.

          Yet again the Record Retailer chart was the odd man out; though this time entering at the high (for Record Retailer) position of number 3. In the New Musical Express, Disc and Pop Weekly charts, it held the Rolling Stones `It’s All Over Now` from reaching number1.

          It was the title of the groups first major feature film. Surprisingly, only shot in monochrome, which now adds to the authentic, feel of what is possibly the finest ever film about a musical unit’s life on the road amongst a crescendo of fan adoration.


          “A Hard Day’s Night” Chart Progress.


          In the New Musical Express chart it entered straight at 1 on 18 July 1964 for four weeks, dropping to number 2 on 15 August. Following positions continued 3, 5, 8, 12, 18 and 27, before leaving the chart on 3 October 1964.

          In the Melody Maker chart it entered straight at 1 on 18 July 1964 for four weeks, dropping to number 2 on 15 August. Following positions continued 2, 4, 7, 9, 12, 19, 28, 30, 37 and 50, before departing the chart on 31 October 1964.

          In the Disc chart it entered straight at 1 on 18 July 1964 for four weeks, dropping to number 2 on 15 August. Following positions continued 3, 5, 6, 9, 12, 18, 26 and 28, before leaving the chart on 17 October 1964.

          `A Hard Days Night` entered the Record Retailer chart at 3 on 18 July 1964, hitting number 1 the following week. It was number 1 for three weeks, falling to number 2 on 15 August 1964. Following positions were, 2, 5, 6, 10, 15, 19, 24 and 28, before leaving the chart on 17 October 1964.

          In the Pick Of The Pops chart it entered straight at 1 on 18 July 1964 for four weeks. It fell to number 2 on 15 August. Following positions were 2, 5, 7, 10, 14, 21 and 28 before departing the chart on 10 October 1964.

          In the Pop Weekly chart it entered straight at 1 on 18 July 1964 for five weeks. It fell to number 2 on 15 August 1964. Following positions were, 3, 4, 10, 10, 17 and 22, before departing the chart on 10 October 1964.

          In the Merseybeat chart it entered straight at 1 on 25 July 1964 for four weeks. It fell to number 2 on 22 August. Following positions were, 3, 5, 12, 12 and 10, before leaving the chart on 3 October 1964.



          A HARD DAYS NIGHT(1964)


          (1964)
          18/7. 25/7. 1/8. 8/8. 15/8. 22/8. 29/8. 5/9. 12/9. 19/9. 26/9. 3/10. 10/10. 17/10. 24/10.

          N.M.E -1 1 1 1 2 3 5 8 12 18 27*

          M.M -1 1 1 1 2 2 4 7 9 12 19 28 30 37 50*

          D -1 1 1 1 2 3 5 6 9 12 19 29*

          R.R -3 1 1 1 2 2 5 6 10 15 19 24 28*

          P.O.T.P -1 1 1 1 2 2 5 7 10 14 21 28*

          P.W -1 1 1 1 1 2 3 4 10 10 17 22*

          M/M.E -1 1 1 1 2 3 5 12 12 10*



          * * *



          A HARD DAY’S NIGHT EP.

          The `A Hard Day’s Night` EP sold just enough to break into the lower half of the Melody Maker Top 50 and the Merseybeats new` Hit 100 chart. It did not register anywhere else, as by now fans weren’t as ready to buy EPs that had songs already an LP they had bought.


          “A Hard Days Night”E.P Chart Progress.

          `A Hard Day’s Night` EP entered the Melody Maker Top 50 on 28 November 1964 at position 48. It went to 34, 41 and 44, before leaving the chart on 26 December 1964.

          In the Merseybeat / Music Echo new Top 100 chart, it entered at 99 on 5 December 1964. Following positions were 56 and 85 before dropping from the chart on 26 December 1964. It re-entered the chart for just the week of 30 January 1965 at position 85.



          A HARD DAYS NIGHT EP(1964-65)

          (1964) (1965)
          28/11. 5/12. 12/12. 19/12. 26/12. 2/1. 9/1. 16/1. 23/1.30/1

          MM -48 34 41 44*
          M/ME - 99 56 85 # # # # # 84*



          * * *


          A HARD DAYS NIGHT LP


          The A Hard Days Night LP entered five singles charts in total (the most by any LP ever!). Only the Melody Maker and Record Retailer singles charts did not register it due to their policy of not letting LPs into their singles charts.

          It wasn’t as big a seller as With The Beatles but was still a tremendous hit. The LP enjoyed a nine week run on both the Disc and Pick Of The Pops charts.


          A Hard Days Night LP Chart Progress

          In the New Musical Express chart it entered at 29 on 18 July 1964. Following positions were 23, 22 and 22 before leaving the chart on 15 August 1964.

          In the Disc chart it entered at 20 on 18 July 1964. Following positions were 20, 17, 16, 18, 19, 20 and 21, before departing the chart on 19 September 1964.

          On the Pick Of The Pops chart it entered at 23 on 18 July 1964. Following positions were 22, 21, 18, 21, 24, 26, 20 and 26, before leaving the chart on 19 September 1964.

          On the Pop Weekly chart it entered at 30 on 25 July 1964. Following positions were 25, 30 and 26, before dropping from the chart on 22 August 1964.

          In the Merseybeat chart it entered at 14 on 8 August 1964. Following positions were 15, 8, and 17 before leaving the chart on 5 September for that week. It re-entered the chart the following week of 12 September 1964 at position 8. Its final position the following week of 19 September was 13, before leaving the chart on 26 September 1964.


          A HARD DAYS NIGHT LP (1964)

          (1964)
          18/7. 25/7. 1/8. 8/8. 15/8. 22/8. 29/8. 5/9. 12/9. 19/9.

          N.M.E -29 23 22 22*

          D -20 20 17 16 18 19 21 20 21*

          P.O.T.P -23 22 21 18 21 24 26 20 26*

          P.W -30 25 30 26*
          M.B -14 15 8 17 # 8 13*




          * * *

          I FEEL FINE.

          Commencing with that startling burst of feedback; ` I Feel Fine` returned the Beatles to million seller status, making it four million selling singles out of five releases. It dominated the Christmas / New Year period 1964-65.

          Again in some charts (Melody Maker and Pop Weekly) It held off the Rolling Stones `Little Red Rooster` from top place. This is why both groups from this point, made sure their record releases did not co-inside. The Stones were no match for the Beatles in those battles.

          The record stayed top for an impressive seven weeks on the Pop Weekly chart. Yet again the Record Retailer was out of step, only entering first week at number 6.

          The record sold around 1,300,000, becoming the years second biggest selling single, not far behind the groups `Can’t Buy Me love` and earning them a fourth gold disc. Today, it has passed the 1,400,000 figure.


          “I Feel Fine” Chart Progress.

          In the New Musical Express chart it entered straight at 1 on 5 Dec ember 1964 for six weeks, dropping to number 2 on 16 January 1965. Following positions were, 7, 13 and 23, before departing the chart on 13 February 1965.

          It entered the Melody Maker chart straight at 1 on 5 December 1964 for six weeks, dropping to number 2 on 16 January 1965. Following positions were, 5, 13, 21, 25, 40 and 49, before departing the chart on 6 March 1965.

          On the Disc chart it entered straight at 1 on 5 December 1964 for six weeks, dropping to number 2 on 16 January 1965. Following positions were, 5, 12, 18 and 24, before departing the chart on 20 February 1965.

          `I Feel Fine` entered the Record Retailer chart at 6 on 5 December 1964, reaching number 1 the following week. It was top for five weeks, dropping to number 2 on 16 January 1965. Following positions were, 7, 13, 19, 25, 38 and 50, before departing the chart on 6 March 1965.

          In the Pick Of The Pops chart it entered straight at 1 on 5 December 1964 for six weeks, which included 2 January 1965 when there was no chart. It fell to number 2 on 16 January 1965. Following positions were 6, 13, 19 and 24, before leaving the chart on 20 February 1965.

          In the Pop Weekly chart it entered straight at 1 on 5 December 1964 for seven weeks. It fell to number 2 on 23 January 1965. Following positions were, 6, 13 and 19, before dropping out of the chart on 20 February 1965.

          In the Merseybeat chart it entered straight at 1 on the first ever Hot 100 chart, for four weeks. It fell to number 2 on 2 January 1965. Following positions were, 2, 3, 3, 12, 16, 28, 31, 42, 55, 97 and 79, before leaving the chart on 27 March 1965.


          I FEEL FINE(1964-65)


          (1964) (1965)
          5/12. 12/12. 19/12. 26/12. 2/1. 9/1. 16/1. 23/1. 30/1. 6/2. 13/2. 20/2. 27/2. 6/3.13/3.

          N.M.E -1 1 1 1 1 1 2 7 13 23*

          M.M -1 1 1 1 1 1 2 5 13 21 25 40 49*

          D -1 1 1 1 1 1 2 5 12 18 30*

          R.R -6 1 1 1 1 1 2 7 13 19 25 38 50*

          P.O.T.P -1 1 1 1 1 1 2 6 13 19 24*

          P.W -1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 6 13 19*

          M/M.E -1 1 1 1 2 2 3 3 12 16 28 31 42 55 97

          I FEEL FINE Cont-

          (1965)

          20/3.
          M/M.E 79*


          * * *



          BEATLES FOR SALE LP

          The Beatles For Sale LP with sales of well over 900,000, was almost as big a seller as With The Beatles.

          The LP enjoyed a five week run in both the New Musical Express and Disc charts. It had a four week run in the Pick Of The Pops chart due to that chart not being compiled on 2 January 1965.


          Beatles For Sale LP Chart progress.

          In the New Musical Express chart it entered at 28 on 12 December 1964. Following positions were 24, 22, joint 24 and 24, before leaving the chart on 16 January 1965.

          On the Disc chart it entered at 26 on 12 December 1964. Following positions were 22, 21, 19 and 21, before dropping from the chart on 16 January 1965.

          In the Pick Of The Pops chart it entered at 28 on 12 December 1964. Following positions were 24 and 20. There was no chart on 2 January 1965, so its next and final position was number 24 on 9 January 1965. It fell from the chart the following week of 16 January 1965.

          In the Merseybeat Top 100 chart it entered at 38 on 19 December 1964. Following positions were 59, 40, 40, 56 and 45, before leaving the chart on 30 January 1965.


          BEATLES FOR SALE LP (1964-65)

          (1964) (1965)
          12/12. 19/12. 26/12. 2/1. 9/1. 16/1. 23/1.

          N.M.E -28 24 22 j24 24*

          D -26 22 21 19 21*

          P.O.T.P -28 24 20 NC 24*

          M.B -38 59 40 40 56 45*

          Comment


          • #6
            Here we go again!

            TICKET TO RIDE.

            `Ticket To Ride` was yet another instant number 1 everywhere, except in the Record Retailer chart. As with Beatles singles now, its chart life was not too long, but it sold over 750,000 and was number 1 for up to 6 weeks in the Pop Weekly chart.

            Yet again the record fared comparatively poorly in the Record Retailer chart. Only entering at number 11, and only staying top for 3 weeks.

            “Ticket To Ride” Chart Progress.

            In the New Musical Express chart it entered straight at 1 on 17 April 1965 for five weeks. It fell to number 4 on 22 May 1965. Following positions were, 10, 18 and 28, before leaving the chart on 19 June 1965.

            In the Melody Maker chart it entered straight at 1 on 17 April 1965 for five weeks. It fell to number 3 on 22 May 1965. Following positions were, 9, 13, 24, 40, 46 and 49, before leaving the chart on 10 July 1965.

            In the Disc chart it entered straight at 1 on 17 April 1965 for four weeks. It dropped to number 2 on 15 May. Further positions were 3, 9, 14 and 22, before leaving the chart on 19 June 1965.

            `Ticket To Ride` entered the Record Retailer chart at 11 on 17 April 1965. It reached number 1 on the 24 April for three weeks. It dropped to number 2 on 15 May 1965. Following positions continued 3, 7, 10, 14, 24, 32 and 50, before leaving the chart on 10 July 1965.

            In The Pick Of The Pops chart it entered straight at 1 for five weeks. It fell to number 3 on 22 May 1965. Following positions were 9, 13, and 21, before leaving the chart on 19 June 1965.

            In the Pop weekly chart it entered straight at 1 for six weeks. It fell to number 4 on 29 May 1965. Further positions were, 10 11 and 14, before leaving the chart on 26 June 1965.

            In the Music Echo (formerly Merseybeat) chart it entered straight at 1 on 17 April 1965 for four weeks. It fell to number 2 on 15 May 1965. Further positions were, 3, 7, 9, 16, 26, 29, 45, 78, 76, 81 and 96, before dropping from the chart on 7 August 1965.


            TICKET TO RIDE(1965)

            (1965)
            17/4. 24/4. 1/5. 8/5. 15/5. 22/5. 29/5. 5/6. 12/6. 19/6. 26/6. 3/7. 10/7. 17/7. 24/7. 31/7.

            N.M.E -1 1 1 1 1 4 10 18 28*

            M.M -1 1 1 1 1 3 9 13 24 40 46 49*

            D -1 1 1 1 2 3 9 14 22*

            R.R -11 1 1 1 2 3 7 10 14 24 32 50*

            P.O.T.P -1 1 1 1 1 3 9 13 21*

            P.W -1 1 1 1 1 1 4 10 11 14*

            M.E -1 1 1 1 2 3 7 9 16 26 29 45 78 76 81 96*


            * * *
            HELP.

            `Help` is now seen as John Lennon’s anguish over his life within the enclosed `bubble` of Beatlemania. Back in the summer of 1965 it was seen as just a slightly sombre love song. In reality, it is the first Beatles `A` side not strictly about love or romance. It sold over 800,000 and there was praise over its poignant lyrics. It of course, became the title track for the Beatles second major feature film.

            The record had a surprisingly low first week of entry in the Pop Weekly chart, at number 15. This wasn’t any cause for worry, as the Pop Weekly chart was very much of minor importance. However, the Record Retailer chart, which entered `Help` at number 5, was of much more worth than Pop Weekly, it was still not seen as influential as either the New Musical Express or Melody Maker listings.


            “Help” Chart Progress.


            In the New Musical Express chart it entered straight at 1 for four weeks on 31 July 1965, dropping to number 2 on 28 August. Following positions were 3, 5, 8, 18 and 22, before departing the chart on 9 October 1965.

            In the Melody Maker chart it entered straight at 1 for four weeks on 31 July 1965, dropping to number 2 on 28 August. Following positions were 3, 4, 9, 17, 29, 35 and 38, before departing the chart on 23 October 1965.

            In the Disc chart it entered straight at 1 for four weeks on 31 July 1965, dropping to number 2 on 28 August. Following positions were 3, 5, 9, 17 and 21 before departing the chart on 9 October 1965.

            `Help` entered the Record Retailer chart at 5 on 31 July 1965. It reached number 1 the following week of 7 August 1965 for three weeks, dropping to number 2 on 28 August. Positions followed were 2, 5, 8, 13, 18, 23, 23, 29 and 40, before departing the chart on 6 November 1965.

            In the Pick Of The Pops chart it entered straight at 1 on 31 July 1965 for four weeks. It dropped to number 2 on 28 August. Following positions were 3, 5, 8, 17, 21 and 28, before departing the chart on 16 October 1965.

            In the Pop Weekly chart it entered at 15 on 31 July 1965. It reached number 1 the following week, staying top for four weeks; the fourth week sharing top position with Sonny and Cher’s `I Got You Babe`. It dropped to number 3 on 4 September 1965. Following positions were, 4, 6, 10, 15, 22, 24 and 29, before leaving the chart on 30 October 1965.

            On the Music Echo top hundred it entered straight at 1 on 31 July 1965 for four weeks. It dropped to number 2 on 28 August 1965. Following positions were, 3, 6, 8, 15, 19, 22, 29, 37, 47, 73 and 83, before departing the chart on 20 November 1965.



            HELP(1965)

            (1965)
            31/7. 7/8. 14/8. 21/8. 28/8. 4/9. 11/9. 18/9. 25/9. 2/10. 9/10. 16/10. 23/10. 30/10. 6/11.

            N.M.E -1 1 1 1 2 3 5 8 18 22*

            M.M -1 1 1 1 2 3 4 9 17 29 35 38*

            D -1 1 1 1 2 3 5 9 17 21*

            R.R -5 1 1 1 2 2 5 8 13 18 23 23 29 40*

            P.O.T.P -1 1 1 1 2 3 5 8 17 21*

            P.W -15 1 1 1 j1 3 4 6 10 15 22 24 29*

            M.E -1 1 1 1 2 3 6 8 8 15 19 22 29 37 47

            HELP Cont-

            (1965)
            13/11. 20/11.

            M.E 73 83*


            * * *



            HELP LP

            The Help LP enjoyed a short chart run in the New Musical Express, Disc, Pick Of The Pops and Music Echo charts. The longest run was in the Disc chart at five weeks, the shortest of two weeks was in the Music Echo chart.


            Help LP Chart Progress.

            In the New Musical Express chart Help LP entered at 26 on 14 August 1965. Following positions were 24, 23 and 26, before leaving the chart on 11 September 1965.

            On the Disc chart it entered at 17 on 14 August 1965. Following positions were 19, 21, 20 and 28, before leaving the chart on 18 September 1965.

            In the Pick Of The Pops chart it entered at 21 on 14 August 1965. Following positions were 20, 23 and 25, before exiting the chart on 11 September 1965.

            On the Music Echo chart it entered at 47 on 21 August 1965. It dropped out of the chart the following week of 28 August before re-entering for one more week at position 55 on 4 September 1965. It fell from the chart for good the following week of 11 September 1965.


            HELP LP (1965)

            (1965)
            14/8. 21/8. 28/8. 4/9. 11/9.

            N.M.E -26 24 23 26*

            D -17 19 21 20 28*

            P.O.T.P -21 20 23 25*

            M.E -47 # 55*




            * * *




            DAY TRIPPER / WE CAN WORK IT OUT.

            The groups first double `A` side; both tracks are fine examples of a musical outfit expanding and honing its talent for producing innovative works. At first `Day Tripper` was seen as the stronger side, but fan pressure and Disc Jockey preference soon put `We Can Work It Out` as the favourite of the two.

            Again the group dominated the Christmas charts, making it a hat-trick of Christmas number 1s. For the first time since `She Loves You` a Beatles release did not enter one of the two major charts at number 1. It only entered the Melody Maker Top 50 at number 3. Brian Epstein was very upset, stating the Melody Maker chart must be made up from “Inferior shops!, like Fish Shops or the like” Ringo Starr, also quoted on Melody Makers front cover, was more equitable about it, commenting that it was “Fine” to enter the MM chart at number 3.

            The Melody Maker displayed across the front and third pages of its 11 December 1965 issue, details from shop managers, who were part of its survey, proof of the records trailing just behind the Seekers `The Carnival Is Over and the Who’s `My Generation`. It is worth remembering, that because Beatles records were generally released on Fridays, they had two days sales figures (Friday and Saturday) against records already in the charts, full week of sales when listed in `their` first week in the charts. `The Carnival Is Over` was already well on its way to well over a million sales, and was stiff competition.

            Surprisingly the record entered the Record Retailer chart at number 2, the highest yet for that chart. Both New Musical Express and Disc still gave the straight at number 1 figure, as did Merseybeats new Hit 100 chart. The B.B.C “Pick Of The Pops” chart entered the record at number 2 due to the Melody Maker chart position.

            The record was the groups fifth and last British million seller at around 1,250,000 by early 1966, thus earning a fifth Golden disc. It was only the years third biggest selling single though, just behind the Seekers `The Carnival Is Over`, and well behind Ken Dodd’s rendition of `Tears` which was already at over 1,500,000 sales and still selling. `Day Tripper / We Can Work It Out` is now over the 1,350,000 mark.


            “Day Tripper / We Can Work It Out” Chart Progress.

            In the New Musical Express chart it entered straight at 1 on 11 December 1965 for five weeks. It dropped to number 2 on 15 January 1966. Following positions were 2, 5, 17 and 27, before departing the top chart on 19 February 1966.

            In the Melody Maker chart it entered at 3 on 11 December 1965, reaching number 1 for four weeks on 18 December. It fell to number 2 on 15 January 1966. Following positions were 2, 4, 9, 18 and 33, before departing the chart on 26 February 1966.

            In Discs chart it entered straight at No1 on 11th December 1965 for five weeks. It fell to No2 on 15th January 1966. Following positions were 2, 5, 8 and 21, before departing the chart on 19th February 1966.

            The double `A` side `Day Tripper / We Can Work It Out` entered the Record Retailer chart at 2 on 11 December 1965. It reached top position the following week for five weeks, including the 1 January 1966 when Record Retailer could not compile a Christmas week chart, and repeated the chart of 25 December. It fell to number 2 on 22 January 1966. Following positions were 4, 7, 13, 27 and 46 before departing the chart on 5 March 1966.

            In the Pick Of The Pops chart it entered at 2 on 11 December 1965. It reached number 1 the following week of 18 December 1965 for a run of four weeks. It fell to number 2 on 15 January 1966. Following positions were 2, 4, 8, and 20, before leaving the chart on 19 February 1966.

            In the Music Echo chart, now a Top 50, it entered straight at 1 on 11 December 1965 for five weeks. It fell to number 2 on 15 January 1966. Following positions were, 2, 7, 7, 16, 25 and 40, before leaving the chart on 5 March 1966.


            DAY TRIPPER / WE CAN WORK IT OUT91965-66)

            (1965) (1966)
            11/12. 18/12. 25/12. 1/1. 8/1. 15/1. 22/1. 29/1. 5/2. 12/2. 19/2. 26/2.

            N.M.E -1 1 1 1 1 2 2 5 17 22*

            M.M -3 1 1 1 1 2 2 4 9 18 33*

            D -1 1 1 1 1 2 2 5 8 21*

            R.R -2 1 1 C.R 1 1 2 4 7 13 27 46*

            P.O.T.P -2 1 1 1 1 2 2 4 8 20*

            M.E -1 1 1 1 1 2 2 7 7 16 25 40*


            * * *



            RUBBER SOUL LP


            Rubber Soul only entered the Disc chart. However, Pick Of The Pops still placed it in their singles chart as well. It enjoyed a five week run in both charts.


            Rubber Soul Chart Progress

            On the Disc chart Rubber Soul entered at 19 on 11 December 1965. Following positions were 16, 22, 25 and 26, before leaving the chart on 15 January 1966.

            On the Pick Of The Pops chart it entered at 24 on 11 December 1965. Following positions were 23, 25, 28 and 29, before leaving the chart on 15 January 1966.


            RUBBER SOUL LP (1965-66)


            (1965) (1966)
            11/12. 18/12. 25/12. 1/1. 8/1.

            D -19 16 22 25 26*

            P.O.T.P -24 23 25 28 29*

            Comment


            • #7
              Here are Beatles 1966 and 1967 stats!



              PAPERBACK WRITER.

              `Paperback Writer` was seen, at the time, as the first single `not` to enter straight at number 1; which shows how influential the New Musical Express chart was in the 1960s. It entered at number 2 in all charts running then, except one. To Brian Epstein’s delight, the record came straight in at number 1 in the Melody Maker chart. Paul McCartney and George Harrison both expressed their joy to the paper.

              `Paperback Writer` also held number 1 longer on the Melody Maker chart; a run of four weeks, as opposed to two weeks top, on all others. Its sales were lower for a Beatles single; but it was the first single by the group not to be primarily a `love` song, thereby losing some sales to the mainly female audience who bought their records then. It still passed the 500,000 mark easily enough though.


              “Paperback Writer” Chart Progress.


              In the New Musical Express chart it entered at 2 on 18 June 1966. It made number 1 for two weeks on 25 June, dropping to number 4 on 9 July. Following positions were, 9, 16, 23 and 28, before leaving the chart on 13 August 1966.

              In the Melody Maker chart it entered straight at 1 for four weeks on 18 June 1966. It dropped to number 8 on 16 July 1966. Following positions were, 15, 19, 23, 32 and 35, before dropping out of the chart on 27 August 1966.

              In the Disc And Music Echo chart, which had now expanded to a Top 50; it entered at 2 on 18 June 1966, achieving number 1 the following week of 25 June for two weeks. It fell to number 2 on 9 July. Following positions were, 6, 15, 21, 28, 28 and 39, before leaving the chart on 27 August 1966.

              `Paperback Writer` entered the Record Retailer chart at 2 on 18 June 1966, attaining number1 the following week. It held number 1 for two weeks, falling to number 2 on 9 July 1966. Following positions were, 7, 14, 19, 21, 30, 40 and 50, before departing the chart on 3 September 1966.

              On the Pick Of The Pops chart it entered at 2 on 18 June 1966. It hit number one the following week of 25 June 1966 for two weeks. On 9 July 1966 it fell to number 2. Following positions were joint number 6, 14, 20 and 24, before leaving the chart on 13 August 1966.


              PAPERBACK WRITER(1966)

              (1966)
              18/6. 25/6. 2/7. 9/7. 16/7. 23/7. 30/7. 6/8. 13/8. 20/8. 27/8.

              N.M.E -2 1 1 4 9 16 23 28*

              M.M -1 1 1 1 8 15 19 23 32 35*

              D -2 1 1 2 6 15 21 28 28 39*

              R.R -2 1 1 2 7 14 19 21 30 40 50*

              P.O.T.P -2 1 1 2 j6 14 20 24*


              * * *



              YELLOW SUBMARINE / ELEANOR RIGBY.

              This, the group’s second double `A` side, was the first single `not` to enter straight at number 1 in any national chart. It enjoyed four weeks at the top in both New Musical Express and Record Retailer charts.

              The record won the Ivor Novello award for `highest audited single sales` for 1966. It was actually (at just over 500,000 units) a long way behind the years top seller; Tom Jones `Green Green Grass Of Home` which was at the 1,000,000 point by years end, and still selling strongly. `Paperback Writer` was the year’s fifth biggest seller; lodged just behind Jim Reeves “Distant Drums” (third) and Frank Sinatra’s “Strangers In The Night” (fourth).


              “Yellow Submarine / Eleanor Rigby” Chart Progress.

              In the New Musical Express chart on 13 August 1966 it entered at number 2, reaching number 1 the following week for four weeks. It dropped to number 2 on 17 September 1966. Following positions were, 7, 13, 19 and 27, before leaving the chart on 22 October 1966.

              In the Melody Maker chart it entered on 13 August 1966 at number 4, reaching number 1 for three weeks on 20 August. It dropped to number 2 on 10 September 1966. Following positions were 2, 5, 10, 16, 19, 31 and 38, before leaving the chart on 5 November 1966.

              In the Disc And Music Echo chart it entered on 13 August 1966 at number 4, reaching number 1 the next week for three weeks. It fell to number 2 on 10 September 1966. Following positions were 3, 7, 9, 17, 22, 29 and 49, before departing the chart on 5 November 1966.

              The Double `A` `Yellow Submarine / Eleanor Rigby`; entered the Record Retailer chart on 13 August 1966 at 8. It reached number 1 the following week of 20 August for four weeks, dropping to number 3 on 17 September 1966. Following positions were 5, 9, 18, 26, 30, 33 and 42, before departing the chart on 12 November 1966.

              In the Pick Of The Pops chart it entered at 4 on 13 August 1966. It reached number 1 the following week of 20 August 1966 for four weeks. The last week at number 1 was shared with the Small Faces `All Or Nothing`. It fell to number 2 on 17 September 1966. Following positions were 7, 10, 18 and 21, before dropping from the chart on 22 October 1966.
              YELLOW SUBMARINE / ELEANOR RIGBY(1966)


              (1966)
              13/8. 20/8. 27/8. 3/9. 10/9. 17/9. 24/9. 1/10. 8/10.15/10. 22/10. 29/10. 5/11.

              N.M.E -2 1 1 1 1 2 7 13 19 27*

              M.M -4 1 1 1 2 2 5 10 16 19 31 38*

              D -4 1 1 1 2 3 7 9 17 22 29 49*

              R.R -8 1 1 1 1 3 5 9 18 26 30 33 42*

              P.O.T.P -4 1 1 1 j1 2 7 10 18 21*



              * * *





              REVOLVER LP

              The Revolver LP only entered the New Musical Express singles chart. It enjoyed a four week stay in August and September 1966. As only the New Musical Express singles chart would accept LPs by mid-1966, Pick Of The Pops ceased listing LPs in its chart.


              Revolver Chart Progress.

              The Revolver LP entered the New Musical Express singles chart at 25 on 13 August 1966. Following positions were 18, 19 and 20, before departing the chart on 10 September 1966.




              REVOLVER LP (1966)

              (1966)
              13/8. 20/8. 27/8. 3/9.

              N.M.E -25 18 19 20*



              * * *

              STRAWBERRY FIELDS FOREVER / PENNY LANE.

              This record; which many Beatles fans feel was the groups’ finest moment on a 45rpm disc (its main competitor for that `honour` being `Hey Jude`). Was their first since `Love Me Do` not to top the majority of national charts.

              However! `Strawberry Fields Forever / Penny Lane` did hit number 1 for a full three weeks on the Melody Maker Top 50, nudging Englebert Humperdink’s `Release Me` off the number 1 spot. After those three weeks `Release Me` regained top place. This chart was very much a major player amongst competing charts as it surveyed more shops than any other compiler, and was quoted by most of the national newspapers and on television `Pop news` features.

              The Melody Maker chart may be forgotten now, but back in the 1960s it was a very important chart. The double `A` side still sold well over 500,000 units, and was actually a bigger seller than the groups last single (and chart topper) `Yellow Submarine / Eleanor Rigby.


              “Strawberry Fields Forever / Penny Lane” Chart Progress.


              In the New Musical Express chart it entered at 3 on 25 February 1967. It stayed at that position for the following week. The next week of 11 March it rose to number 2 for two weeks. It fell to number 5 on 25 March 1967. Following positions were, 10, 12, 16 and 26, before falling from the chart on 29 April 1967.

              In the Melody Maker chart it entered at 3 on 25 February 1967, reaching number 1 for three weeks on 4 March. It dropped to number 4 on 25 March. Following positions were, 9, 11, 15, 19 and 27, before dropping from what was now, Melody Makers Top 30 on 6 May 1967.

              In the Disc chart, which too, was now a Top 30; it entered at 3 on 25 February 1967. The next week of 4 March 1967 it rose to number 2 for four weeks. It fell to number 9 on 1 April. Following positions were, 11, 13, 21 and 26, before leaving the chart on 5 May 1967.

              The double `A` `Strawberry Fields Forever / Penny Lane` entered the Record Retailer chart on 25 February 1967 at number 5. It rose to number 2 the following week of 4 March 1967 for three weeks. It dropped to number 5 on 25 March. Following positions were, 10, 8, 12, 23, 36 and 50, before departing the chart on 13 May 1967.

              On the Pick Of The Pops chart it entered at 3 on 25 February 1967. It rose to number 2 the following week of 4 March for three weeks. It fell to number 3 the week of 25 March 1967. Following positions were 10, 10, 13, 20 and 29, before departing the chart on 6 May 1967.


              STRAWBERRY FIELDS FOREVER / PENNY LANE(1967)

              (1967)
              25/2. 4/3. 11/3. 18/3. 25/3. 1/4. 8/4. 15/4. 22/4. 29/4. 6/5.

              N.M.E -3 3 2 2 5 10 12 16 26*

              M.M -3 1 1 1 4 9 11 15 19 27*

              D -3 2 2 2 2 9 11 13 21 26*

              R.R -5 2 2 2 5 10 8 12 23 36 50*

              P.O.T.P -3 2 2 2 3 10 10 13 20 29*



              * * *





              SGT PEPPERS LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND LP

              As with Revolver, the Sgt Pepper LP only entered the New Musical Express singles chart. It enjoyed a three week stay during June 1967.


              Sgt Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band Chart Progress.

              In the New Musical Express singles chart Sgt Pepper entered at 26 on 3 June 1967. It rose to number 21 the following week of 10 June before its final week on the chart at position 27 on 17 June 1967. The next week of 24 June 1967 it left the chart.


              SGT PEPPERS LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND LP (1967)

              (1967)
              3/6. 10/6. 17/6.

              N.M.E -26 21 27*



              * * *




              ALL YOU NEED IS LOVE.

              `All You Need Is Love` quickly became one of `the` anthems associated with 1967s Summer of Love; capturing the mood and essence of the period. It entered the New Musical Express chart straight at number 1; and just a little lower in the other charts.

              It topped all four national charts, faring best in New Musical Express at four weeks in top place. It sold around 600,000 copies in 1967, staying 13 weeks in the Record Retailer Top 50, which was the only remaining published Top 50 by mid-1967. The Disc And Music Echo chart was merged with Melody Makers on 26 August 1967, leaving just three national charts.


              “All You Need Is Love” Chart Progress.


              In the New Musical Express chart it entered straight at 1 on 15 July 1967 for four weeks. It fell to number 2 on 12 August; following positions were 3, 6, 9, 13 and 20, before departing the chart on 23 September 1967.

              In the Melody Maker chart it entered at 3 on 15 July 1967, reaching number 1 for three weeks on 22 July. It fell to number 2 on 12 August. Following positions were 2, 4, 10, 13, 17 and 22, before departing the chart on 30 September 1967.

              In the Disc And Music Echo chart it entered at 6 on 15 July 1967 reaching number 1 for two weeks on 22 July. It fell to number 2 on 5 August then to number 2 again on the 12 and finally to number 3 on 19 August. The following week of 26 August 1967 the Disc And Music Echo chart was combined with Melody Makers’.

              `All You Need Is Love` entered the Record Retailer chart at 2 on 15 July 1967. It reached number 1 for three weeks on 22 July. It fell to number 2 on 12 August 1967. Following positions were 2, 3, 6, 13, 15, 21, 27 and 40, before departing the chart on 14 October 1967.

              In the Pick Of The Pops chart it entered at 3 on 15 July 1967. It reached number 1 the following week of 22 July for three weeks, before falling to number 2 on 12 August 1967. Following positions were joint number 2, 4, 9, 13, 18 and 25, before leaving the chart on 30 September 1967.


              ALL YOU NEED IS LOVE(1967)


              (1967)
              15/7. 22/7. 29/7. 5/8. 12/8. 19/8. 26/8. 2/9. 9/9. 16/9. 23/9. 30/9. 7/10.

              N.M.E -1 1 1 1 2 3 6 9 13 20*

              M.M -3 1 1 1 2 2 4 10 13 17 22*
              }
              D -6 1 1 2 2 3*
              R.R -2 1 1 1 2 2 3 6 13 15 21 27 40*

              P.O.T.P -3 1 1 1 2 j2 4 9 13 18 25*



              * * *


              HELLO GOODBYE.

              The groups last single of 1967 was the very commercial `Hello Goodbye`, which gave them their fourth Christmas chart topper in five years. It was a record that John Lennon, after the group had split, often castigated.

              It did its job well though; selling just over 820,000 copies to become the years third largest selling single. It just edged past the Monkees `I’m A Believer`, Englebert Humperdink’s `There Goes My Everything` and the classic `Whiter Shade Of Pale` from Procul Harum to achieve this.The two Englebert Humperdink number 1 singles of the year, `Release Me` and `The Last Waltz` were the years clear leaders; both selling over 1,150,000 copies.

              `Hello Goodbye` equalled the seven-week run of `From Me To You` at number 1 in the Record Retailer chart. In the Melody Maker chart it only (including the week with no chart on 30 December) hit number 1 for five weeks. The record kept the groups `Magical Mystery Tour` double EP set at number 2 in the New Musical Express and Record Retailer charts. In the Melody Maker chart, things were a bit different.


              “Hello Goodbye” Chart Progress.


              In the New Musical Express chart it entered at 3 on 2 December 1967 reaching number 1 the following week of 9 December 1967 for six weeks. It fell to number 4 on 20 January 1968. Following positions were, 7, and 16, before departing the chart on 10 February 1968.

              In the Melody Maker chart it entered at 3 on 2 December 1967 reaching number 1 the following week of 9 December 1967 for five weeks (this included the week of 30 December 1967 when Melody Maker did not produce a Christmas chart that year). It fell to number 3 on 13 December 1968. Following positions were, 5, joint No7, 15 and 21, before leaving the top chart on 17 February 1968.

              `Hello Goodbye` entered the Record Retailer chart at 9 on 2 December 1967. It reached number 1 the next week of 9 December for seven weeks. It dropped to number 8 on 27 January 1968. Following positions were, 16, 30 and 48, before leaving the chart on 24 February 1968.

              On the Pick Of The Pops chart it entered at 4 on 2 December 1967. It reached number 1 the following week of 9 December. It enjoyed a six week run at number one, which included the week of 30 December 1967, when there was no chart. On 20 January 1968 it fell to number 3. Following positions were 8, 16 and 26, before leaving the chart on 17 February 1968


              HELLO, GOODBYE(1967-68)

              (1967) (1968)
              2/12. 9/12. 16/12. 23/12. 30/12. 6/1. 13/1. 20/1. 27/1. 3/2. 10/2. 17/2.

              N.M.E -3 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 7 16*

              M.M -3 1 1 1 NC 1 3 5 j7 15 21*

              R.R -8 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 8 16 30 48*

              P.O.T.P -4 1 1 1 NC 1 1 3 8 16 26*



              * * *




              MAGICAL MYSTERY TOUR EP.


              The `Magical Mystery Tour` Double EP set, became the first EP to be allowed into the Record Retailer chart in many years, due to the fact of that chart ceasing barely a week later (16 December 1967) to `MMTs` release on 8 December 1967.

              The EP (at 19 shillings & 6 pence) though more expensive than singles, still sold well. It sold well over 600,000 copies, raising its chart position to challenge the groups own `Hello Goodbye` for prime place. It actually achieved this feat in the Melody Maker chart on 13 December 1968, for just that week. `Hello Goodbye` dropped to number 3.The record at number 2, thus separating the two Beatles discs on that date was he Monkees `Daydream Believer`, itself a half million plus seller.

              `Magical Mystery Tour` though slated, as a television `spectacular` was an impressive success in the singles charts.


              “Magical Mystery Tour” (E.P) Chart Progress.

              In the New Musical Express chart it entered at 10 on 16 December 1967, then up to number 8 the following week. The next week of 30 December it hit number 2 for two weeks. It fell to number 4 on 13 January 1968. Following positions were, 6, 8, 15 and 23, before leaving the chart on 17 February 1968.

              In the Melody Maker chart it entered at 17 on 16 December 1967, then up to number 10 the following week of 23 December. There was no chart on 30 December 1967, so its next position was at number 4 on 6 January 1968. It reached number 1 for the week of 13 January 1968 falling to number 2 the following week. Positions thereafter were, joint No7, 14, 17, 21 and 25, before leaving the chart on 2 March 1968.
              The `Magical Mystery Tour` Double EP set, became only the second ever, EP to enter the Record Retailer chart. This is because the Record Retailer EP chart had finally ended on 9 December 1967, leaving the singles chart free to include EPs if sales were high enough. `Magical Mystery Tour` entered the Record Retailer chart on 16 December 1967 at number 20. It rose to number 3 the following week. The week after that of 30 December 1967, it made number 2 for three weeks. It fell to number 4 on 20 January 1968. Positions thereafter were, 5, 12, 18, 25, 34 and 39, before leaving the chart on 9 March 1968.

              In the Pick Of The Pops chart it entered at 16 on 16 December 1967. It rose to number 7 the following week dated 23 December 1967. The following week of 30 December there was no chart, so its next chart position was on 6 January 1968 at number 2. It held second position for another week then positions were 4, 7, 14, 20 and 26, before departing the chart on 24 February 1968.


              MAGICAL MYSTERY TOUR EP (1967-68)



              (1967) (1968)
              16/12. 23/12. 30/12. 6/1. 13/1. 20/1. 27/1. 3/2. 10/2. 17/2 .24/2. 3/2.

              N.M.E -10 8 2 2 4 6 8 15 23*

              M.M -17 10 NC 4 1 2 j7 14 17 21 25*

              R.R -20 3 2 2 2 4 5 12 18 25 34 39*

              P.O.T.P -16 7 NC 2 2 4 7 14 20 26*

              Comment


              • #8
                Addition! I found the reason why "Yellow Submarine / Eleonor Rigby" won that Ivor Novello award! It was for the highest selling record of 1966 written by UK writers(s) not just highest selling disc of 1966 (which it clearly wasn;'t)

                Higher UK 1966 sellers "Green Green Grass of Home" "Distant Drums" and "Strangers in the Night" were composed by US writers and did not qualify! Bizarre-but true!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Now here are 1968, 69 & 70!

                  LADY MADONNA.

                  `Lady Madonna` was something of a surprise to fans and reviewers back in early 1968. Some people didn’t even recognise it as the Beatles!

                  With a keen eye for current trends, the group swung towards the “Back to Basics” trend following psychedelia. For a short period a full-blown “Rock N’ Roll” revival was mooted as the sound of 68’; it soon died down.

                  `Lady Madonna` was the lowest selling Beatles single since `Please Please Me`. It gained the group yet another silver disc for more than 250,000 copies sold; but it did not go much further than that figure, just about reaching 300,000.

                  It became the first `official Beatles single release not to head the Melody Maker chart, ending a run of 15 consecutive number 1s in that chart (16 if `Magical Mystery Tour` is counted, even though it is not a single). It still topped both the New Musical Expressd, Record Retailer and Pick Of The Pops charts for two weeks.

                  It was another record that John Lennon in later interviews did not hold in high esteem. The record was the first since `Yellow Submarine` not to hit number 1 on any of the American charts.


                  “Lady Madonna” Chart Progress.

                  It entered the New Musical Express chart at 6 on 23 March 1968, rising to number 1 for two weeks on 30 March 1968. It fell to number 4 on 13 April 1968. Following positions were, 6, 12 and 23, before leaving the chart on 11 May 1968.

                  It entered the Melody Maker chart at 3 on 23 March 1968. It then rose to number 2 for two weeks on 30 March; falling to number 5 on 13 April 1968. Following positions were, 6, 17 and 25, before leaving the chart on 11 May 1968.

                  `Lady Madonna` entered Record Retailer chart on 23 March 1968 at position 11. It rose to the number 1 spot for two weeks on 30 March 1968. It fell to number 4 on 13 April 1968. Following positions were, 6, 9, 26 and 35, before leaving the chart on 18 May 1968.

                  On the Pick Of The Pops chart it entered at 6 on 23 March 1968. It made number 1 the following week of 30 March for two weeks before falling to number 4 on 13 April 1968. Following positions were 6, 16 and 24, before departing the chart on 11 May 1968.


                  LADY MADONNA(1968)

                  (1968)
                  23/2. 30/2. 6/4. 13/4. 20/4. 27/4. 4/5. 11/5. N.M.E -6 1 1 4 6 12 23*

                  M.M -3 2 2 5 6 17 25*

                  R.R -11 1 1 4 6 9 26 35*

                  P.O.T.P -6 1 1 4 6 16 24*



                  * * *



                  HEY JUDE.

                  `Hey Jude`; is often rated as one of the all time classic singles, gave the Beatles Apple label a tremendous debut. Helped by an 8 September 1968 airing by the group on The David Frost Show the single entered both the Melody Maker and the new Top Pops charts, straight at number 1. It entered the New Musical Express chart at number 3, but incredibly only entered the Record Retailer chart at number 21. Many have speculated why such a difference in the Record Retailer chart.

                  The reason is the August Bank Holiday, which disrupted the Record Retailer postal returns (Melody Maker switched to phoning shops when the post was delayed by holidays. New Musical Express always conducted phoned surveys).

                  The Record Retailer first compiled a `temporary` chart; which Record Mirror published. In this `Hey Jude` only entered at number 27. Clearly the Record Retailer chart was struggling to keep mistakes at a minimum.

                  `Hey Jude` regained for the group the best selling single of the year achievement. It sold over 800,000 that year, followed by the labels `Those Were The Days by Mary Hopkin as second best seller of the year at over 750,000.

                  In one of his last interviews to the Radio One Disc Jockey, Andy Peebles, John Lennon was angrily commenting on his songs ending up as `B` sides to Paul’s. He remarked that `Revolution` was put on the flip side of some s**t like `Hello Goodbye!` He stopped; realising the actual song, which `Revolution` was paired with; apologising and making it very clear that `Hey Jude` was “Worth It”.

                  Along with `Strawberry Fields Forever / Penny Lane`; it is rated as the very best of the groups output on a single.


                  “Hey Jude” Chart Progress.

                  In the New Musical Express chart it entered at 3 on 7 September 1968; rising to number 1 for three weeks on 14 September. It fell to number 2 on 5 October 1968. Following positions were, 3, 4, 4, 13, 15, 24 and 28, before departing the chart on 30 November 1968.

                  In the Melody Maker chart it entered straight at 1 for four weeks on 7 September 1968. It fell to number 2 on 5 October 1968. Following positions were 3, 3, 2, 6, 11, 13, 21 and 28, before dropping from the chart on 7 December 1968.

                  `Hey Jude` entered the Record Retailer chart at 21 on 7 September 1968. It rose to number 1 the following week of 14 September for two weeks. It fell to number 2 on 28 September. Following positions were 2, 3, 4, 3, 2, 7, 10, 11, 24, 25, 30, 45 and 50, before departing the chart on 28 December 1968.

                  In the Pick Of The Pops chart it entered at 8 on 7 September 1968. It reached number 1 the following week of 14 September 1968 for three weeks. It fell to number 2 on 5 October 1968. Following positions were joint 3, joint 3, 2, 8, joint 11, 16, 24 and 30, before leaving the chart on 7 December 1968.

                  In the Top Pops chart it entered straight at 1 for four weeks on 7 September 1968. It fell to number 2 on 5 October 1968. Following positions were 3, 3, 2, 6, 15, 12, 21 and 28, before departing the chart on 7 December 1968.

                  HEY JUDE(1968)

                  (1968)
                  7/9. 14/9 .21.9. 28/9. 5/10. 12/10. 19/10. 26/10. 2/11. 9/11. 16/11. 23/11. 7/12. 14/12.

                  N.M.E -3 1 1 1 2 3 4 4 13 15 24 28*

                  M.M -1 1 1 1 2 3 3 2 6 11 13 21 28*

                  R.R -21 1 1 2 2 4 3 2 7 10 11 24 25 30

                  P.O.T.P -8 1 1 1 2 j3 j3 2 8 j11 16 24 30*

                  T.P/M.N -1 1 1 1 2 3 3 2 6 15 12 21 28*


                  HEY JUDE Cont-

                  21/12. 28/12.
                  R.R 45 50*



                  * * *






                  THE BEATLES LP

                  The eponymous Beatles LP again, only entered the New Musical Express singles chart for a three week run in November / December 1968. It holds two `singles` chart records.

                  It was the final LP to enter a singles chart due to New Musical Express finally discontinuing the practise of allowing LPs into its charts. It was also the only double LP to enter a singles chart. Two records that stand for all time.




                  The Beatles Chart Progress.


                  The Beatles double LP set entered the New Musical Express singles chart at 20 on 30 November 1968. It fell to number 24 the following week of 7 December. It fell again the following week of 14 December 1968 to position 29. It fell from the chart the next week of 21 December 1968.


                  THE BEATLES LP (1968)

                  (1968)
                  30/11. 7/12. 14/12.

                  N.M.E -20 24 29*




                  * * *




                  GET BACK.

                  `Get Back` is the single that is `officially` classified as the group’s only entry straight at number 1. This ludicrous fact is only due to Guinness Hit Singles using the Record Retailer charts for the bulk of its 1960s data.

                  The newly established British Market Research Bureau (BMRB) chart was able to sample far more shops than the old Record Retailer chart, and `Get Back` profited by this. The single enjoyed over a month at the top in each chart, faring best in the BMRB lists with six weeks at number 1.

                  When the new BMRB chart commenced on 13 February 1969, Pick Of The Pops ceased its averaged compiling method and began using the new chart.

                  The record sold close to 550,000 copies, which made it the year’s second biggest seller, behind The Archies `Sugar Sugar.`




                  “Get Back” Chart Progress.


                  In the New Musical Express chart it entered at 3 on 26 April 1969, reaching number 1 for five weeks on 3 May 1969. It fell to number 2 on 7 June. Following positions were 4, 6, 10 and 21, before leaving the chart on 12 July 1969.

                  It Entered the Melody Maker chart at 2 on 26 April 1969, reaching number 1 for five weeks on 3 May 1969. It fell to number 2 on 7 June. Following positions were 4, 5, 12, 19, 27 and 30, before departing the chart on 26 July 1969.

                  `Get Back` entered the BMRB chart straight at 1 on 26 April 1969 for six weeks. It fell to number 2 on 7 June 1969. Further positions were 5, 6, 18, 21, 26, 27, 33, 36, 47 and 45, before leaving the chart on 23 August 1969.

                  In the Top Pops chart it entered straight at 7 on 26 April 1969, reaching number 1 on 3 May for three weeks. It fell to number 2 on 24 May 1969, then following positions were 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 18, 22, 26 and final week of 26 July at No 30.



                  GET BACK(1969)

                  (1969)
                  26/4. 3/5. 10/5. 17/5. 24/5. 31/5. 7/6. 14/6. 21/6. 28/6. 5/7. 12/7. 19/7. 26/7. 2/8. 9/8.

                  N.M.E -3 1 1 1 1 1 2 4 6 10 21*

                  M.M -2 1 1 1 1 1 2 4 5 12 19 27 30*

                  B.M.R.B -1 1 1 1 1 1 2 5 6 18 21 26 27 33 36 47

                  T.P/M.N -7 1 1 1 2 4 5 6 7 8 18 22 26 30*


                  GET BACK Cont-

                  (1969)
                  16/8.

                  B.M.R.B 45*


                  * * *






                  THE BALLAD OF JOHN AND YOKO.

                  `The Ballad Of John And Yoko` which, was the groups last British number 1, was, as we now know a true Lennon and McCartney collaboration; John wrote it, Paul helped with drums, bass and vocals.

                  It was a surprise release for fans back in mid-1969, following `Get Back` by only a few weeks into the charts. Not as huge a seller as its predecessor, but still managing to clear the 300,000 mark quite easily. This is perhaps one of the lesser known of the groups hits, in many quizzes, when the question “What was the Beatles final number 1?” gets asked, only devout fans get it correct!


                  “The Ballad of John and Yoko” Chart Progress.



                  In the New Musical Express chart it entered at joint number 11 on 7 June 1969. It rose to number 2 the following week and then to number 1 for two weeks from 21 June. It fell to number 3 on 5 July 1969. Following positions were, 5, 8, 13, 16 and 25, before leaving the chart on 16 August 1969.

                  In the Melody Maker chart it entered at 15 on 7 June 1969. It rose to number 2 the following week and to number 1 for three weeks on 21 June. It fell to number 3 on 12 July 1969. Following positions were, 6, 13, 17 and 22, before leaving the chart on 16 August 1969.

                  `The Ballad Of John And Yoko” Entered the BMRB chart at 4 on 7 June 1969, rising to number 1 the next week of 14 June for three weeks. It fell to number 3 on 5 July 1969. Following positions were, 3, 11, 15, 22, 27, 37, 38, 47 and 50, before departing the chart on 13 September 1969.

                  In the Top Pops chart it entered at 15 on 7 June 1969. It rose to number 5 the following week and then to number 1 for two weeks from 21 June. It fell to number 2 on 5 July 1969. Following positions were 8, 22, 22, 17 and 30, before leaving the chart on 2 August 1969.


                  THE BALLAD OF JOHN AND YOKO(1969)

                  (1969)
                  7/6. 14/6. 21/6. 28/6. 5/7. 12/7. 19/7. 26/7. 2/8. 9/8. 16/8. 23/8. 30/8. 6/9.

                  N.M.E -j11 2 1 1 3 5 8 13 16 25*

                  M.M -15 2 1 1 1 3 6 13 17 22*

                  B.M.R.B -4 1 1 1 3 3 11 15 22 27 37 38 47 50*

                  TP -15 5 1 1 2 8 22 22 17 30*



                  * * *








                  SOMETHING / COME TOGETHER.


                  For the first time a George Harrison composition gained the honour of an `A` side on a Beatles single, though this was shared with John’s `Come Together` as part of the groups fourth `double A` release.

                  Unfortunately, for the first time since `Love Me Do` the group failed to earn silver disc for over 250,000 sales. The reason mainly given is that the Abbey Road LP, from which the two tracks were taken from, was already on sale. Alan Klein, who was managing the group’s affairs at that time, had little knowledge of British sales patterns then, and the group themselves had little concern then over release schedules.

                  The American method of releasing prime tracks as `marketing tools` to promote the parent LP they originated from, was a procedure not common to British record companies, or consumers (not for many years did Britain start to follow this trend) record buyers back in 1969 were reluctant to buy singles they already owned on an album.

                  Another factor is the collapsing single’s market of the late 1960s. By late 1969 sales of the seven inch disc were at their lowest since 1958, and even the mighty Beatles were not selling singles in the same numbers as 1963 to 1965. There was no audited million selling single between 1967s `The Last Waltz` (Englebert Humperdink) up to 1973s `Eye Level` (Simon Park Orchestra) a very barren period! The best that `Something / Come Together` could achieve was third position in the Top Pops / Music Now charts.


                  “Something / Come Together” Chart Progress.


                  In the New Musical Express chart it entered at 17 on 8 November 1969, rising to number 10 the next week. The week after of 22 November 1969 it peaked at number 5 for three weeks, falling to number 9 on 13 December. Following positions were, 14, 21, 20 and 27, before departing the chart on 17 January 1970.

                  It entered the Melody Maker chart (now a Top 50) at 26 on 8 November 1969, rising to number 12 the next week. The week following, of 22 November it rose to number 5, and then peaked at number 4 on 29 November 1969. It fell to number 6 the next week. Following positions were, 8 and 11. There was no chart published 27 December 1969. Positions resumed at 3 January 1970 at number 14; thereafter were 19, 27 and 43, before leaving the chart on 31 January 1970.

                  The double `A` `Something / Come Together` entered the BMRB chart at 15 on 8 November 1969, rising to number 6 the following week. The next week of 22 November it peaked at number 4 then fell to number 6 the week after. Following Positions were, 8, 11, 18 and 21. There was no chart on 3 January 1970, so the next position was number 18 on 10 January 1970. Following positions were, 40 and 45, before leaving the chart on 31 January 1970.

                  In the Top Pops / Music Now chart it entered at 26 on 8 November 1969. Following positions were 10, 9, a peak of number 3 on 29 November, then on 6 December 1969, position 4. Amazingly that was its last week in the chart! From 13 December 1969 it dropped from the chart altogether.


                  SOMETHING / COME TOGETHER(1969-70)


                  (1969) (1970)
                  8/11. 15/11. 22/11. 29/11. 6/12. 13/12. 20/12. 27/12. 3/1. 10/1. 17/1. 24/1*

                  N.M.E -17 10 5 5 5 9 14 21 20 27*

                  M.M -26 12 5 4 6 8 11 NC 14 19 27 43*

                  B.M.R.B -15 6 4 6 8 11 18 21 NC 18 40 45*

                  T.P/M.N -26 10 9 3 4*


                  * * *



                  LET IT BE.

                  The final `official` group release in the UK, `Let It Be` was, lessons being learned, this time released ahead of the eponymous parent LP. It entered the BMRB charts at number 2, but sadly progress after that was downward. It did manage to sell over the 250,000 mark; earning the group, outside of EPs, their 20th Silver disc (five of those 20 were also gold discs).

                  “Let It Be” Chart Progress.


                  It entered the New Musical Express chart at joint number 9 on 14 March 1970, peaking the next week at number 3 for two weeks. It fell to number 7 on 4 April 1970. Following positions were, 10, 13 and 26, before departing the top chart on 2 May 1970.

                  It entered the Melody Maker Top 50 chart at 15 on 14 March 1970, rising to number 3 for two weeks on 21 March. It fell to number 6 on 4 April 1970. Following positions were, 10, 13, 20, 28, 37, 48, 45 and 43, before departing the chart on 6 June 1970.

                  `Let It Be` entered the BMRB chart at 2 on 14 March 1970. Following positions were 3, 4, 7, 11, 16, 26, 34 and 34 again, before leaving the chart on 16 May 1970. The record made a re-entry for just the week dated 24 October 1970 at number 43, before finally departing the chart on 31 October 1970.

                  It entered the Top Pop / Music Now chart at 3 on 14 March 1970; rising the following week, in the now `solely` Music Now chart to number 2 for two weeks. It fell to number 7 on 4 April 1970. Following positions were, 14 and 28, before leaving the chart on 2 May 1970.



                  LET IT BE(1970)


                  (1970)
                  14/3. 21/3. 28/3. 4/4. 11/4. 18/4. 25/4. 2/5. 9/5. 16/5. 23/5. 30/5. 24/10.

                  N.M.E -j9 3 3 7 10 13 26*

                  M.M -15 3 3 6 10 13 20 28 37 48 45 43*

                  B.M.R.B -2 3 4 7 11 16 26 34 34 # 43*

                  M.N -3 2 2 7 14 28*

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    And now! The LPs

                    BEATLES L.P’s 1963 to 1970

                    The Beatles LPs enjoyed great success in the major LP charts of the sixties. However there were some interesting differences in number of weeks at number1 between charts, and first week of entry. For the period 1963 to 1970 only three L.P charts figures mostly apply. These are Record Retailer (RR), New Musical Express (NME), and Melody Maker (MM).

                    These were the only regular charts for the bulk of the years 1963 -70. On 8 February 1969, Record Retailer ceased its own chart compiling. From 15 February 1969, it was replaced by the British Market Research Bureau statistics (BMRB), which will be used.

                    Other music papers did not give LP charts priority. Pop Weekly only ran one from 11 September to November 27 1965. Music Echo only ran theirs from 25 May 1965 to 16 April 1966 and Disc only from 23 April 1966 to 19 August 1967 when Disc began using the Melody Maker chart.

                    The Music Echo chart of 16 April 1966 and Disc chart of 23 April 1966 are not a continuation; they were completely different samples. Top Pops / Music Now ran a LP chart from May 1968 to May 1971. Where possible; data will be displayed from these, `lesser` charts as well. Due thanks are given to Dave McAleer for his invaluable help with first week of entry on the Record Retailer chart.

                    PLEASE PLEASE ME (1963)


                    In the Melody Maker Top 10 it entered at 10 on 6 April 1963. It went to positions 7, 5 and 3, before reaching number 1 on 4 May 1963. It spent 30 weeks at the top to 30 November 1963, being replaced by With the Beatles.

                    The debut LP from The Beatles Please Please Me, entered the Record Retailer Top 20 LP chart on 6 April 1963 at position 8. It proceeded to positions 3, 3, 2 and 2 before reaching number 1 on 11 May 1963. It enjoyed a 30-week stay on top to 30 November 1963 when replaced by the groups follow up With The Beatles.

                    It entered the New Musical Express Top 10 on 30 March 1963 at position 9. It went to positions 6, 5, 3, 2 and 2, before reaching number 1 on 11 May 1963. It stayed top for 29 weeks to 23 November 1963 being replaced by With The Beatles.

                    * *


                    WITH THE BEATLES.(1963)

                    In the Melody Maker chart, it entered straight at 1 on 30 November 1963. It enjoyed 22 weeks top to 25 April 1964, until replaced by The Rolling Stones.

                    With the Beatles entered the Record Retailer chart on 30 November 1963 at position 2. It reached number 1 the following week of 7 December, supplanting Please Please Me. It spent 21 weeks top to 25 April 1964, being replaced by The Rolling Stones first LP.

                    The LP entered straight at 1 on the New Musical Express chart on 30 November 1963. It spent 21 weeks at number 1 to 18 April 1964, being replaced by The Rolling Stones.


                    * *



                    A HARD DAYS NIGHT.(1964)


                    In the Melody Maker chart it entered straight at 1 on 18 July 1964 for 21 weeks in top position to 5 December 1964. It was replaced by Beatles For Sale the following week of 12 December 1964.

                    A Hard Day’s Night entered the Record Retailer chart at 3 on 25 July 1964. It rose to number 1 the following week of 1 August 1964. It held top position for 21 weeks to 12 December 1964 until being replaced by the Beatles next LP Beatles For Sale.

                    In the New Musical Express chart it entered straight at 1 on 18 July 1964. It held top place for 21 weeks to 5 December 1964 until replaced by Beatles For Sale.

                    BEATLES FOR SALE.(1964)


                    In the Melody Maker chart, it entered straight at 1 on 12 December 1964 for an initial nine-week stay in top place to 6 February 1965. Replaced by Rolling Stones No 2 the record regained top spot on 24 April 1965 for another six-week top, to 29 May 1965. Again, the Bob Dylan Freewheelin LP took over top place. The record enjoyed a longer stay at the top, in total in the Melody Maker chart, holding top spot for 15 weeks overall.

                    Beatles For Sale entered the Record Retailer chart on 12 December 1964 at number 4. It made number 1 the following week of 19 December 1964 for an initial seven-week run to 30 January 1965. Rolling Stones No 2 displaced it from top position on 6 February 1965. Beatles For Sale regained prime position the week of 27 February 1965 for just that week, being once again displaced by The Rolling Stones on 6 March. It regained number 1 again on 1 May 1965 for a final three week run at top position to 15 May 1965. Bob Dylan’s Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan LP took over number 1 on 22 May 1965. The record totalled 11 weeks at number 1 in the Record Retailer chart.

                    In the New Musical Express chart, it entered straight at 1 on 12 December 1964. It held an initial six-week stay at number1 to 16 January 1965 to be replaced by Rolling Stones No 2. On 24 April 1965 it regained top spot, replacing The Rolling Stones, for another three weeks to 8 May 1965. On 15 May 1965 Bob Dylan’s Freewheelin Bob Dylan took over top position. The record totalled nine weeks at number1 in the New Musical Express chart.





                    * *


                    HELP.(1965)


                    For the first time in the Record Retailer chart with Help, the Beatles entered straight at 1 with the LP on 14 August 1965 for nine-weeks, to 9 October 1965, to be replaced by the The Sound Of Music soundtrack.

                    In the New Musical Express chart it entered straight at 1 on 14 August 1965 for a stay of 11 weeks top to 23 October 1965. It was displaced as in the Record Retailer chart, by The Sound Of Music.

                    In the Melody Maker chart, the record entered straight at 1 on 14 August 1965 for an initial run of nine-weeks on top to 9 October 1965. It was displaced on 16 October for just that week, by The Rolling Stones Out Of Our Heads LP. Help regained number 1 the following week of 23 October for another run of six-weeks at number 1 to 27 November 1965. This time on 4 December it was replaced by The Sound Of Music. As with Beatles For Sale, Help enjoyed more weeks at number1 in the Melody Maker chart; totalling 15 weeks in top position.

                    Help also entered the Music Echo Top 50 LP chart (the countries largest at that time) straight at 1 on 14 August 1965; staying top for 16 weeks to 27 November 1965. Again The Sound of Music eventually toppled it.



                    • *





                    RUBBER SOUL.

                    “Rubber Soul” entered the Record Retailer chart on 11th December 1965 at No12; it rose to No2 the following week, displacing “The sound of Music” on 25th December. Once top, it remained at No1 for 8 weeks to 12th February 1966, when “The Sound of Music” re-asserted itself the following week.

                    In the New Musical express chart, it entered straight at no1 on 11th December 1965. It held top place for 12 weeks to 26th February 1966, making way for “The sound of Music” the following week.

                    In the Melody Maker chart, it entered straight at No1 on 11th December 1965, holding top position for 13 weeks to 5th March 1966. Again, it made way the following week for “The Sound of Music” soundtrack.

                    “Rubber Soul” also entered the Music Echo chart, straight at No1 on 11th December 1965. It held top place for 13 weeks to 5th March 1966, being displaced by “The Sound of Music”. It regained prime position on 19th March, holding on for another two weeks to 26th March 1966; again displaced by “The Sound of Music”


                    * *




                    REVOLVER.

                    In what was now Record Retailers top 30 chart. “Revolver”, for the second time, for a Beatles L.P, in that charts history, entered straight at No1 on 13th August 1966; replacing “The Sound of Music”. It held No1 for 7 weeks to 24th September 1966, giving way to the soundtrack of “The Sound of Music” the following week.

                    In the New Musical Express chart, it entered straight at No1 on 13th August 1966. As with the R.R chart, it held top position for 7 weeks to 24th September 1966; again giving way to the soundtrack L.P.

                    In Melody Makers chart, it entered straight at No1 on 13th August 1966, holding top position to 8th October 1966, a total of 9 weeks. As with the other charts it gave way to “The Sound of Music”

                    In Discs new top 10 L.P chart,” Revolver” entered straight at No1 on 13th August 1966. It held top place for 8 weeks to 1st October 1966, again making way for “The Sound of Music”

                    * *




                    A COLLECTION OF OLDIES.

                    Though not strictly a true release which the group were involved in; the “Oldies” L.P deserves mentioning.

                    In the Record Retailer chart (now a Top 40) it entered on 10th December 1966, attaining 7th position.

                    In the New Musical Express chart, which was now a top 15, it entered on 17th December 1966, reaching joint 6th position (tied with The Seekers “Come The Day” L.P).

                    In the Melody Maker listing, it entered on 17th December 1966. It reached No4 for two weeks.

                    In Disc and Music Echo’s chart, it entered on 17th December 1966, reaching 4th position.

                    * *




                    SGT PEPPERS LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND.

                    The seminal “Sgt Pepper” entered Record Retailers chart on 3rd June 1967 at No8, reaching No1 the following week. It initially held top position for 23 weeks to 11th November 1967, before being dislodged by “The Sound of Music” for one week. The next week of 25th November 1967 “Sgt Pepper” regained No1 for just that week, again making way for the soundtrack. It regained prime position on 23rd December 1967, holding it for the following week of 30th December, before moving over this time for Val Doonicans “Val Doonican Rocks-But Gently!” “Sgt Pepper” again climbed back to No1. This time on 3rd February 1968, for one more week. This was its 27th in total in the R.R chart. It finally gave way on 10th February 1968 to “The Four Tops Greatest Hits”“

                    The Record entered the New Musical Express chart, straight at No1 on 3rd June 1967. It held top position to 14th October 1967, a 20-week stay, making way for “The Sound Of Music”. “Sgt Pepper as in the R.R chart, regained No1 over the Christmas/New year period on the weeks 6th and 13th January 1968, a further 2 weeks, bringing its total at No1 in the N.M.E chart to 22 weeks. Again it made way for Val Doonican.
                    In the Melody Maker chart it entered straight at No1 on 3rd June 1967. It held top position for 22 weeks to 28th October 1967, making way the following week for “The Sound of Music”. “Sgt Pepper” did not regain top position over the Christmas/New Year period in Melody Makers chart. Part of the reason being, that the M.M did not prepare a chart for 30th December 1967.

                    In the Disc and Music Echo chart “Sgt Pepper” again entered straight at No1 on 3rd June 1967. It held No1 up to where Disc and Music Echo began using the Melody Maker listings on 26th August 1967. This meant that the L.P also spent 22 weeks at No1 in one run.

                    * *




                    THE BEATLES.

                    The eponymous titled “The Beatles” double L.P set, entered the Record Retailer, chart straight at No1, on 7th December 1968, a full week later than all other L.P charts. It enjoyed an initial 7 week run to 18th January 1969. “The Best of The Seekers” bested it for the week of 25th January. It regained top place the next week of 1st February 1969 for that one more week, making way the week of 8th February 1969 for “The Best of The Seekers”. The L.P spent a total of 8 weeks at No1 on Record Retailers chart.

                    In the New Musical Express chart it entered straight at No1 on 30th November 1968. It enjoyed a 9-week stay at the top to 25th January 1969. Again “The Best of The Seekers” displaced it.

                    In Melody Makers chart, now a top 20; for the first time since “Please Please Me” an official Beatles L.P did not enter straight at No1. “The Beatles” entered at No3 on 30th November 1968. It reached No1 the following week of 7th December, remaining there for 11 weeks to 15th February 1969. This time on 22nd February 1969 the “Diana Ross and the Supremes, Meet the Temptations” L.P was its conqueror.

                    In the Top Pops chart, a top 10, “The Beatles” entered at No5 on 30th November 1968. It reached No 1 the following week of 7th December 1968 for 6 weeks to 11th January 1969. It made way for The Seekers the following week, regaining No1 for one more week on 25th January 1969, a total of 8 weeks. As with the Record Retailer and NME charts, “The Best of the Seekers” bested it.

                    * *









                    YELLOW SUBMARINE.

                    The “Yellow Submarine” L.P was not a major Beatles release, so its chart performances weren’t on a par with regular Beatles L.P’s. It entered Record Retailers chart on 1st February 1969 reaching No3.

                    In the New Musical Express chart, it entered on 25th January 1969, and reached No3.

                    In the Melody Maker chart, it entered on 1st February 1969, reaching No 4.

                    In the Top Pops chart, it entered on 25th January 1969, reaching No3.

                    * *




                    ABBEY ROAD.

                    “Abbey Road” entered the British Market Research Bureau top 50 listing, straight at No1 on 4th October 1969. It held No1 for 11 weeks until replaced by The Rolling Stones “Let It Bleed” on 20th December 1969. It regained No1 the following week of 27th December 1969 for a further 6 weeks to 31st January 1970. It was finally replaced on 7th February 1970, by “Led Zeppelin 2” after a total of 17 weeks at the top.

                    In the New Musical Express chart, now a top 20; it entered straight at No1 on 4th October 1969. It held No1 for 18 weeks to 31st January 1970. The final week at No1 on 31st January 1970 was shared with the “Mowtown Vol 3“L.P. The following week of 7th February 1970, “Led Zeppelin 2” took over top position.

                    In the Melody Maker chart, it entered straight at No1 on 4th October 1969. It held on to top position for 20 weeks to 14th February 1970. It finally made way on 21st February 1970, for “Led Zeppelin 2”.

                    In the Top Pops/Music Now top 20, it entered straight at No1 on 4th October 1969. It held No1 in this chart for just 12 weeks to 20th December 1969, making way for The Rolling Stones “Let It Bleed” on 27th December 1969.


                    * *



                    LET IT BE.

                    The final true Beatles release, the boxed set of “Let It Be” entered the British Market Research Bureau chart, straight at No1 on 23rd May 1970 (Replacing “Bridge Over Troubled Waters”) for just 3 weeks to 6th June 1970. The following week, the Simon and Garfunkel classic regained top spot.

                    In the New Musical Express chart, the L.P entered at No3 on 16th May 1970; a week before the other charts. It moved to No2 and 2 again, before finally achieving top position on 6th June 1970. It held top for 3 weeks to 20th June, before making way for “Bridge Over Troubled Water” on 27th June. It regained top place for the week of 18th July 1970 before moving over for “Bridge” on 25th July. Again “Let It Be” climbed back to No1 on 1st August 1970, this time for 2 weeks to 8th August, before finally conceding to “Bridge Over Troubled Water” on 15th August 1970. It totalled 6 weeks in all at the top of the N.M.E chart.

                    In the Melody Maker chart now a top 30; it entered at No3 on 23rd May 1970. The following week it remained at No3, hitting No1 the next week of 6th June 1970. It held on to top place for 8 weeks to 25th July 1970, before losing to “Bridge Over Troubled Water” the following week.

                    In the Music Now chart, as it was called; “Let It Be” entered at No 2 on 23rd May 1970. It hit No1 on the following week of 30th May 1970 for 4 weeks to 27th June 1970. Unusually in the Music Now chart, it was replaced at the top by the Who’s “Live At Leeds”.

                    To conclude: it is clear from these figures that The Beatles dominated the top of the main L.P charts in the 1960’s. They bestrode the decade like a colossus, their only real competition being surprisingly the “Sound of Music” soundtrack. The Rolling Stones were some competition in 1964/5 but only with their first two albums. The Beatles by far held the No1 position in L.P charts from 1963 to 1970. In the Record Retailer/B.M.R.B charts which Guinness rely on for that period, Beatles L.P’s totalled 162 weeks at No1 in total. In the New Musical Express listings, the total was 165 weeks. Rather better was their performance in Melody Makers chart; a total of 186 weeks in prime place.

                    © Alan Smith.







                    BEATLES L.P’s IN THE SINGLES CHARTS.

                    Despite the contradictory title, amazingly, Beatles L.P’s did actually achieve positions in some national singles charts. The “New Musical Express” chart’s policy was to include `any` form of disc, no matter its format; hence both E.P’s and a few L.P’s would enter its top 30 singles chart. Even when the N.M.E started running a L.P chart from 6th June 1962, it still allowed L.P’s into the listings. This policy lasted up to 1969 when due to the continuing increase in L.P sales, the N.M.E realised that its singles chart would soon look like a secondary L.P chart. This leaves “The Beatles” Double L.P set as the last ever L.P to gain a position in a singles listing.

                    The Paper “Disc” did not have an L.P chart until 23rd April 1966 when it absorbed Music Echo; becoming “Disc and Music Echo”, with a top 10 L.P chart. Before that Date it had allowed L.P’s, if sales were high enough, to enter its singles top 30.
                    “Pop Weekly” only briefly ran a top 5 L.P chart from 18th September, to 6th November 1965. Before then it too allowed L.P’s into its top 30.

                    Finally “Merseybeat”, before, as “Music Echo” started the country’s first top 50 L.P chart on 29th May 1965; allowed L.P’s into both its top 20 up to 26th November 1964; and its top 100 from 3rd December 1964. The two remaining national charts; “Record Retailer” and “Melody Maker” never allowed L.P’s into their singles listings. Both already ran L.P charts, and kept both formats separate. It was confusing for fans in the 60’s though! A letter in the 24th June 1967 Melody Maker, letters page, from A.Blackelock of Tonbridge, (Who obviously read the N.M.E as well) asked, “Reading the MM and seeing the Beatle’s new album (“Sgt Pepper” sic) has sold over 250.000 copies, I wonder if there is any reason for it not being in the top five singles chart?” The succinct answer to his question, printed below that letter, was; “Yes, It’s an L.P”.

                    Because Beatles L.P’s from “With The Beatles” onward sold in vast amounts in their first few weeks of release, they appeared in those charts that allowed other format of records into singles charts. The Beatles were not the sole act to achieve this distinction in the 1960’s; the Rolling Stones also made the singles listings with their first two Long Players.


                    WITH THE BEATLES.

                    Anticipation for this, the second Beatles L.P had been at fever pitch in the late autumn of 1963. On release in late November 1963 it sold over 300.000 copies in a week, entering both the New Musical Express and Melody Maker L.P charts, straight at no1. The L.P also charted in the N.M.E, Disc and Pop Weekly singles charts`. It actually climbed to No 9 in Disc’s top 30 singles chart, so becoming the highest ever charting L.P in any singles chart. It passed the 1.000.000 sales by 1965.

                    With The Beatles” Singles Chart Progress.

                    “With The Beatles” entered the N.M.E singles chart at No 15 on 30th November 1963. Following positions were, 11, 14, 17, 15 and 20, before leaving the chart on 18th January 1964. Its 11th position on 7th December 1963 was the highest position that an L.P had reached in that charts history.

                    In the Disc chart, it entered at No 14 on 30th November 1963. Following positions were, 11, 13, 15, 17, 9 and 26, before leaving the chart on 18th January 1964. The 9th position on 4th January 1964 was not only the highest position ever in Disc’s singles chart, but the highest ever singles chart position for an L.P ever. A record, that still stands today; and is extremely unlikely, to ever be surpassed.

                    In the Pop Weekly chart, it entered at joint No 22 on 7th December 1963. It fell out of the chart the following week, but re-entered the week after that, of 21st December 1963 at No 24. Following positions were, 22, 22, 23 and 25, before finally departing the chart on 25th January 1964. The two positions of No 22, were the highest that any L.P was ever placed in the Pop Weekly singles chart.

                    (1963) (1964)
                    30/11. 7/12. 14/12. 21/12. 28/12. 4/1. 11/1. 18/1.
                    N.M.E -15 11 14 17 15 20 j20*

                    D -14 11 13 15 17 9 26*

                    P.W -22 # 24 22 22 23 25*


                    * * *


                    A HARD DAYS NIGHT.

                    “The Soundtrack L.P of the Beatles first, and in virtually every fan’s opinion, best! Film, was another huge selling L.P. Selling more than 800.000 copies it dominated the top of the album charts throughout the summer and autumn of 1964. This L.P entered four singles charts! Merseybeat, was producing a weekly singles chart and chart progress can now be logged.

                    “A Hard Days Night” Singles Chart Progress.

                    In the N.M.E chart, “A Hard Day’s Night” entered, on 18th July 1964, at No 29. Following positions were 23, 22 and 22 again, before leaving the chart on 15th August 1964.

                    In the Disc chart, it entered at No 20 on 18th July 1964. Following positions were, 20, 17, 16, 18, 19, 21, 20 and 21, before leaving the chart on 19th September 1964.

                    In the Pop Weekly chart, it entered on 25th July 1964 at No 30. Following positions were, 25, 30 and 26, before leaving the chart on 22nd August 1964.

                    In the Merseybeat chart, it entered on 8th August 1964 at No 14. Following positions were, 15, 8 and 17, before leaving the chart on 5th September. It re-entered on 12th September at No 8. It fell to No 13 the following week, before finally departing the chart on 26th September 1964.

                    (1964)
                    18/7. 25/7. 1/8. 8/8. 15/8. 22/8. 29/8. 5/9. 12/9. 19/9. 26/9.
                    N.M.E -29 23 22 22*

                    D -20 20 17 16 18 19 21 20 21*

                    P.W -30 25 30 26*

                    M / M.E -14 15 8 17 # 8 13*


                    * * *




                    BEATLES FOR SALE.

                    Another huge selling L.P, some reports have given it million in sales total, “Beatles For Sale” entered the N.M.E, Disc and the new Merseybeat top 100 chart.

                    “Beatles For Sale” Singles chart progress.

                    In the N.M.E chart, “Beatles For Sale” entered on 12th December 1964 at No 28. Following positions were 24, 22, joint 24 and 24 again, before departing the chart on 16th January 1965.

                    In the Disc chart, it entered on 12th December 1964 at No 26. Following positions were 22, 21, 19 and 21, before departing the chart on 16th January 1965.

                    In the Merseybeat `Hot 100` it entered on 19th December at No 38. Following positions were 59, 40, 40, 56 and 45, before departing the chart on 30th January 1965.


                    (1964) (1965)
                    12/12. 19/12. 26/12. 2/1. 9/1. 16/1. 23/1. 30/1.
                    N.M.E -28 24 22 j24 24*

                    D -26 22 21 19 21#

                    M / M.E -38 59 40 40 56 45*


                    * * *





                    HELP.

                    The group’s second `soundtrack` L.P “Help” was yet another resounding triumph in the late summer of 1965. This entered both the N.M.E and Disc charts. Both Pop Weekly and Music Echo (Formerly Merseybeat) were now running L.P charts, and so L.P’s were excluded from their singles listings. The N.M.E had been running a L.P chart since June 1962, but it still allowed L.P’s into its singles listings, if sales were large enough!


                    “Help” Singles chart progress.

                    “Help” entered the N.M.E chart on 14th August 1964 at No 26. Following positions were 24, 23 and 26, before leaving the chart on 11th September 1965.

                    It entered the Disc chart on 14th August 1965 at No 17. Following positions were, 19, 21, 20 and 28, before leaving the chart on 18th September 1965.

                    (1965)
                    14/8. 21/8. 28/8. 4/9. 11/9. 18/9.
                    N.M.E -26 24 23 26*

                    D -17 19 21 20 28*


                    * * *


                    RUBBER SOUL.

                    The “Rubber Soul”L.P, only entered the Disc singles chart listings in December 1965. It was a strong seller over the Christmas / New year period 1965 / 66.

                    “Rubber Soul” Singles chart progress.

                    “Rubber Soul” entered Disc’s chart on 11th December 1965 at No 19. Following positions were 16, 22, 25 and 26, before leaving the chart on 15th January 1966.

                    (1965) (1966)
                    11/12. 18/12. 25/12. 1/1. 8/1. 15/1.
                    D -19 16 22 25 26*


                    * * *


                    REVOLVER.

                    “Revolver” did not sell quite as well in the U.K as previous Beatles L.P’s, but it was still a very successful release. By mid 1966 Disc had absorbed Music Echo, becoming Disc and Music Echo. The new paper now ran a top 10 L.P chart, so no longer placed L.P’s in the singles listings.

                    “Revolver” Singles chart progress.

                    “Revolver” entered the N.M.E charts on 13th August 1966 at No 25. Following positions were 18, 19 and 20, before leaving the chart on 10th September 1966.

                    (1966)
                    13/8. 20/8. 27/8. 3/9. 10/9.
                    N.M.E -25 18 19 20*


                    * * *




                    SGT PEPPERS LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND.

                    The “Sgt Pepper” L.P was a tremendous seller during the summer of 1967. It sold around 900.000 by mid 1968, which was a very impressive figure when the L.P chart was still seen (In the U.K) as the `lesser` listing. “Pepper” has, over the years logged up substantial sales; particularly helped by the new C.D format. It is today, the best ever selling L.P in U.K record history, selling well over 4.000.000 copies.

                    “Sgt Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band”. Singles chart progress.

                    “Sgt Pepper” entered the N.M.E chart on 3rd June 1967 at No 26. Following positions were 21 and 27, before leaving the chart on 24th June 1967.

                    (1967)
                    3/6. 10/6. 17/6. 24/6.
                    N.M.E - 26 21 27*

                    * * *




                    THE BEATLES. (WHITE L.P).

                    The groups first and only, double L.P, became the only double L.P ever to make a singles chart. It also holds the record of being the last ever L.P to gain a singles chart placing. This is not because of falling sales of albums; quite the reverse in fact! The continued upward sales of that format in the late sixties/early seventies, caused even the N.M.E to abandon the policy of listing Albums in the singles chart. If it had not; the N.M.E singles chart would have looked like a second L.P chart by the mid 70’s! The precise cut off date is not known, but it is likely to have been before The Beatles next Album release, “Abbey Road” in late September 1969, otherwise that Album, would have surely made the singles listings.



                    “The Beatles” (White L.P) Singles chart progress.

                    “The Beatles” entered the N.M.E chart on 30th November 1968 at No 20. Following positions were 24 and 29, before departing the chart on 21st December 1968, the final Album ever to grace a singles chart.

                    (1968)
                    30/11. 7/12. 14/12. 21/12.
                    N.M.E -20 24 29*





                    * * *
                    BEATLES LPs AT NUMBER 1 IN THE UK ALBUM CHARTS.


                    The Beatles LPs dominated the UK album charts from 1963 to 1970. There were some differences in the number of weeks at number 1 between the various LP charts which could be a variance of six or seven weeks with some titles.

                    There were three major LP charts during the period the Beatles were dominant; 1963 to 1970. These were the Melody Maker, Record Retailer and New Musical Express charts. Other 1960s album charts were published in Disc And Music Echo from 23 April 1966 to 19 August 1967. The Music Echo chart which ran from 29 May 1965 to 16 April 1966. The Top Pops later titled Music Now, chart which ran from 25 May 1968 to early 1971. It is uncertain exactly when Music Echo ceased; though no paper dated beyond February 27 1971 has ever turned up.

                    Each Beatles LP entry to each chart will be noted plus all weeks at number 1.



                    PLEASE PLEASE ME (1963)

                    Please Please Me entered the Melody Maker Top 10 LP chart at 10 on 6 April 1963. Following positions were 7, 5, and 3, before reaching number 1 on 4 May 1963. It held that position for 30 weeks, which is the longest continuous run in top position for any UK Beatles album. It was knocked from top spot by the groups following album With The Beatles on 30 November 1963.

                    It entered the Record Retailer Top 20 LP chart at 8 on 6 April 1963. Following positions were 3, 3, 2 and 2, before reaching number 1 on 11 May 1963. It held that position for 30 weeks (equalling the Melody Maker run at number 1) to 7 December 1963 when With The Beatles replaced it at the top of the Record Retailer chart.

                    On the New Musical Express Top 10 LP charts it entered at 9 on 30 March 1963. Following positions were 6, 5, 3, 2 and 2, before reaching number 1 on 11 May 1963. It held that position for 29 weeks to 30 November 1963 when With The Beatles replaced it. Please Please Me knocked Cliff Richards Summer Holiday LP from its long run at number 1 on all three charts.


                    WEEKS AT NUMBER 1

                    M.M = 30 R.R = 30 N.M.E = 29


                    Please Please Me sold well over 600,000 copies through 1963 and 1964.



                    * * *

                    WITH THE BEATLES (1963)


                    With The Beatles entered the Melody Maker chart straight at 1 on 30 November 1963, replacing the groups Please Please Me LP. It held top position for 22 weeks, which combined with the previous 30 week stay on top of the chart by Please Please Me made a calendar year of 52 weeks by both LPs. It was finally knocked from number 1 on 2 May 1964 by the Rolling Stones first LP.

                    On the Record Retailer chart it entered at 2 on 30 November 1963, reaching number 1 the following week of 7 December 1963. It was number 1 for 21 weeks before the first Rolling Stones LP replaced it at the top of the Record Retailer charts on 2 May 1964.

                    On the New Musical Express chart it entered straight at 1 on 30 November 1963 for a run of 21 weeks at number 1. On 25 April 1964 the first Rolling Stones LP replaced it on top by entering straight at 1 on the New Musical Express chart.


                    WEEKS AT NUMBER 1

                    M.M =22 R.R = 21 N.M.E =21


                    With The Beatles had advance orders of over 250,000 before release. It sold over 500,000 copies in just three days. The LP eventually passed the million UK sales in 1965.



                    * * *



                    A HARD DAYS NIGHT (1964)


                    A Hard Days Night entered the Melody Maker chart straight at 1 on 18 July 1964. It enjoyed 21 weeks top of the chart before being replaced on 12 December 1964, by the groups next LP, Beatles For Sale.

                    It entered the Record Retailer chart at 3 on 18 July 1964, reaching number 1 the following week of 25 July 1964. It held top place for 21 weeks before giving way to Beatles For Sale on 19 December 1964.

                    It entered the New Musical Express chart straight at 1 on 18 July 1964 for a 21 week run at number 1. It was replaced at number 1 by Beatles For Sale on 12 December 1964. A Hard Days Night had replaced the first Rolling Stones LP on all three charts.


                    WEEKS AT NUMBER 1

                    M.M = 21 R.R = 21 N.M.E = 21


                    A Hard Days Night had advance orders of 250,000. It wasn’t as big a seller as With The Beatles but it still sold well over 600,000 copies.


                    * * *



                    BEATLES FOR SALE (1964)

                    Beatles For Sale entered the Melody Maker chart straight at 1 on 12 December 1964. It replaced the groups own A Hard Days Night LP for a run at the top for an initial nine weeks to 6 February 1965. It was replaced at number 1 by The Rolling Stones No 2” LP on 13 February 1965. It regained top spot from the Rolling Stones on 24 April 1965 for a further run of six weeks top of the Melody Maker chart. It was finally knocked from number 1 by Bob Dylan’s The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan LP on 5 June 1965.

                    On the Record Retailer chart it entered at 4 on 12 December 1964. It replaced the groups own A Hard Days Night LP at number 1 the following week of 19 December for an initial stay of seven weeks. On 6 February 1965 it was replaced by Rolling Stones No 2 LP. It re-gained top place for the week of 27 February 1965 by replacing the Rolling Stones. It gave way to the Rolling Stones the next week of 6 March 1965. It made it back to number 1 on 1 May 1965, once again deposing the second Rolling Stones LP, for another three weeks. The LP was finally replaced by The Freewheeelin’ Bob Dylan LP on 22 May 1965.

                    On the New Musical Express chart it entered straight at 1 on 12 December 1964. It replaced the groups own A Hard Days Night LP for a initial run of six weeks top. It was replaced at number 1 by The Rolling Stones No2 on 23 January 1965. On 24 April 1965 it regained top spot from the Rolling Stones for a final three week run at number 1. It was knocked from the top on 15 May 1965 by The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan LP.

                    Beatles For Sale was at number 1 on the very first LP chart (a Top 50) produced by Music Echo on 29 May 1965. The LP was replaced at the top on the following week’s chart of 5 June 1965 by Bob Dylan’s Bringing It All Back Home LP.


                    WEEKS AT NUMBER 1

                    M.M = 9 + 6 = Total of 15 weeks. R.R = 7 + 1 + 3 = Total of 11 weeks.

                    N.M.E = 6 + 3 = Total of 9 weeks.


                    Beatles For Sale was a very big seller over the Christmas / new year of 1964 / 65. It sold over 900,000 to 1966.



                    * * *




                    HELP (1965)


                    Help entered the Melody Maker LP chart straight at 1 on 14 August 1965, knocking The Sound Of Music from that position. It held the number 1 spot for nine weeks until the Rolling Stones Out Of Our Heads LP replaced it for the week of 16 October 1965. Help regained top spot the very next week of 23 October 1965 for another six weeks. It was finally knocked from the top on 4 December 1965 by The Sound Of Music. It totalled 15 weeks at number 1 on the Melody Maker charts.

                    On the Record Retailer LP charts it entered straight at 1 on 14 August 1965, replacing The Sound Of Music. It held the number 1 position for nine weeks before giving way to The Sound Of Music on 16 October 1965.

                    On the New Musical Express LP chart it entered straight at 1 on 14 August 1965, replacing The Sound Of Music. It held number 1 for 11 weeks before giving away to The Sound Of Music on 30 October 1965.

                    On the Music Echo Top 50 chart it entered straight at 1 on 14 August 1965, replacing The Sound Of Music. It enjoyed 16 weeks at number 1 before making way for The Sound Of Music on 4 December 1965.


                    WEEKS AT NUMBER 1

                    M.M = 9 + 6 = Total of 15 weeks. R.R = 9 N.M.E = 11 M.E = 16


                    The Help LP was another great sales success with close to 700,000 copies sold to the end of 1965.


                    * * *




                    RUBBER SOUL (1965)


                    Rubber Soul entered straight at 1 on the Melody Maker chart on 11 December 1965, replacing The Sound Of Music. It held the number 1 position for 13 weeks before giving way again to The Sound Of Music on 12 March 1966.

                    On the Record Retailer chart it entered at the lowly position of 12 on 11 December 1965. It rose to number 2 the following week of 18 December 1965, and finally toppled The Sound Of Music on 25 December 1965. It held top place for eight weeks before The Sound Of Music regained peak position on 19 February 1966.

                    On the New Musical Express chart it entered straight at 1 on 11 December 1965, knocking The Sound Of Music from that position. It held top place for 12 weeks before The Sound Of Music re-took top position on 5 March 1966.

                    On the Music Echo chart it entered straight at 1 on 11 December 1965, replacing The Sound Of Music at the top. It held this position for an initial run of 13 weeks before giving way to The Sound Of Music on 12 March 1966. Rubber Soul regained the number 1 position the following week of 19 March 1966 for a final two weeks at the top. It finally gave way once more to The Sound Of Music on 2 April 1966. Rubber Soul totalled 15 weeks on top of the Music Echo LP charts.



                    WEEKS AT NUMBER 1

                    M.M = 13 R.R = 8 N.M.E = 12 M.E = 13 + 2 = Total of 15 weeks.


                    The Rubber Soul LP was later seen as a great artistic step forward for the group (contemporary reviews were not so enthusiastic). It was another 500,000 plus seller. The Record Retailer chart was the only listing `not` to have the LP enter straight at number 1. In fact Rubber Soul took three weeks to top the Retailer LP chart, which is very hard to believe considering the vast amounts Beatles LPs sold in their first two weeks on the market.


                    * * *



                    REVOLVER (1966)

                    Revolver entered straight at 1 on the Melody Maker chart on 13 August 1966. It replaced The Sound Of Music for the next nine weeks before that LP regained top spot on 15 October 1966.

                    On the Record Retailer chart, which was now a Top 40, it entered straight at 1 on 13 August 1966. It replaced The Sound Of Music for seven weeks before The Sound Of Music overtook it again on 1 October 1966.

                    On the New Musical Express chart it entered straight at 1 on 13 August 1966. It replaced The Sound Of Music for seven weeks to 1 October 1966, before that LP regained top position.

                    On the new Disc And Music Echo Top 10 LP chart it entered straight at 1 on 13 August 1966. Yet again it was The Sound Of Music which was displaced at number 1; for eight weeks on this chart before retaking top spot on 8 October 1966.


                    WEEKS AT NUMBER 1

                    M.M =9 R.R = 7 N.M.E = 7 D & M.E = 8

                    Sales of Revolver were less than previous Beatles LPs, possibly due to the group moving away from romantic songs and towards more experimental sounds. It still sold just over 500,000 in the UK. The LP is now regarded as a significant step forward in pop music and a template for the group’s greatest success.


                    * * *



                    A COLLECTION OF OLDIES (1966)

                    Due to the group not having an LP ready for release at Christmas 1966, Parlophone decided to release a greatest hits package with just the one previously unreleased song, a 1965 version of Larry Williams `Bad Boy`. As fans had all but this song already the LP did not sell anywhere as well as the group’s regular releases.

                    On the Melody Maker chart it peaked at number 4 in December 1966.

                    On the Record Retailer chart it peaked at number 7 in December 1966.

                    On what was now the New Musical Express Top 15 LP chart, it peaked at joint number 6; sharing that position with the Seekers Come The Day LP in December 1966.
                    On the Disc And Music Echo chart it peaked at position 4 in December 1966.




                    * * *




                    SGT PEPPERS LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND (1967)

                    The seminal Sgt Pepper album hit the Melody Maker LP chart straight at 1 on 3 June 1967, replacing The Sound Of Music for 22 weeks. On 4 November 1967 The Sound Of Music took over top position once more.

                    On the Record Retailer chart Sgt Pepper entered at 8 on 3 June 1967. It hit number 1 the following week of 10 June 1967 for an initial run of 23 weeks. On 18 November 1967 The Sound Of Music which had made way for Sgt Pepper regained number 1 for that week. Sgt Pepper swapped places at the top with The Sound Of Music the following week of 25 November 1967. Yet again The Sound Of Music climbed back to the top on the following week of 2 December 1967. Sgt Pepper again battled its way past The Sound Of Music to the top on 23 December for another two weeks at number 1. On 6 December 1968 it’s conqueror for top place was Val Doonican Rocks –But Gently LP. Sgt Pepper climbed back for its final (and twenty seventh in total) week at the top on 3 February 1968. Finally the next week of 10 February 1968 the Four Tops Greatest Hits knocked it from top position.

                    On the New Musical Express chart Sgt Pepper entered straight at 1 on 3 June 1967, replacing The Sound Of Music at number 1. It held this position for an initial run of 20 weeks on the New Musical Express listings before The Sound Of Music re-gained top position on 21 October 1967. On 6 January 1968 it regained top place from The Sound Of Music for two more weeks. On 20 January 1968 the unlikely Val Doonican Rocks-But Gently took over at the top. Sgt Pepper totalled 22 weeks at number 1 on the New Musical Express charts.

                    On the Disc And Music Echo chart it entered straight at 1 on 3 June 1967 replacing the second Monkees album More Of The Monkees at the top. As Disc And Music Echo shared the Melody Maker chart from 26 August 1967 onwards, the number of weeks that Sgt Pepper topped the Disc And Music Echo LP chart was the same 22 as on the Melody Maker chart.


                    WEEKS AT NUMBER 1

                    M.M = 20 + 2 = 22 Total of 22 weeks. R.R = 23 + 1 + 2 + 1 Total of 27 weeks.

                    N.M.E = 20 + 2 = Total of 22 weeks. D & M.E = Same as Melody Maker.

                    The Sgt Pepper album was possibly the most significant release in pop music history. It moved the industry focus from singles to LPs, sparking a sales boom in LPs which transformed pop music culture.

                    The LP sold over 250,000 copies in its first week on sale and over 500,000 in a month. It eventually passed the million sales by early 1973. From the mid 1990s to 2007 the LP held the title of the best ever seller in the UK market. Queens Greatest Hits has recently taken over this honour.



                    * * *



                    THE BEATLES (WHITE) (1968)

                    The groups first double LP set entered the Melody Maker (now a Top 20) chart at 3 on 30 November 1968. This was the first time a regular LP release had failed to enter the Melody Maker straight at number 1 since the Please Please Me LP. The Beatles attained the number 1 position the following week of 7 December 1968 displacing the Hollies Greatest Hits. It held top position for 11 weeks before making way on 22 February 1969 for Diana Ross And The Supremes Join The Temptations LP.

                    On the Record Retailer chart it entered a week later on 7 December 1968 straight at 1. It held this position for an initial run of seven weeks before being replaced top by the Best Of The Seekers on 25 January 1969. It regained top position from the Seekers LP for the following week of 1 February 1969 for its final week at the top. The next week of 8 February 1969 the Best Of The Seekers regained the number 1 spot.

                    On the New Musical Express chart it entered straight at 1 on 30 November 1968, replacing the Hollies Greatest Hits. It help number 1 for nine weeks before making way for the Best Of The Seekers LP on 1 February 1969.

                    On the Top Pops Top 10 LP chart it entered at 5 on 30 November 1968. The following week of 7 December 1968 it replaced the Hollies Greatest Hits at the top, holding that position for an initial six weeks. The week of 18 January 1965 it was replaced at number 1 by the Best Of The Seekers for that week. The following week of 25 January 1969 it regained top spot from the Seekers Greatest Hits for one more week at the top. The next week of 1 February 1969; the Seekers LP regained prime place on the Top Pops LP chart.


                    WEEKS AT NUMBER 1

                    M.M = 11 R.R = 7 + 1 = Total of 8 weeks.

                    N.M.E = 9 T.P = 6 + 1 = Total of 7 weeks.

                    Because it was a double set and more expensive The Beatles did not enter the Melody Maker and Top Pops charts instantly at number 1. The LP was still a tremendous world wide sales success and yet another 500,000 plus sale in the UK.



                    * * *






                    YELLOW SUBMARINE (1969)

                    The Yellow Submarine LP, like A Collection Of Oldies was not seen as a major release. It only contained four new songs and sold rather less than the groups preceding double LP set.

                    On the Melody Maker chart it peaked at number 4 in February 1969.

                    On the Record Retailer, and its successor, the British Market Research Bureau chart it peaked at position 3 in February 1969.

                    On the New Musical Express chart it also peaked at number 3 in February 1969.

                    On the Top Pops chart it again peaked at number 3 in February and March 1969.

                    Yellow Submarine was the last Beatles LP to be issued in both Mono and Stereo. By 1969 the UK record companies were switching rapidly to stereo only LP issue.



                    * * *








                    ABBEY ROAD (1969)

                    Abbey Road entered the Melody Maker chart straight at 1 on 4 October 1969, replacing the Blind Faith LP for 20 weeks at the top. On 21 February 1970 it was knocked from number 1 by Led Zeppelin II.

                    On the British Market Research Bureau listing it entered straight at 1 on 4 October 1969, replacing the Blind Faith album. It help number 1 for an initial run of 11 weeks before making way for the Rolling Stones Let It Bleed for the week of 20 December 1969. The following week of 27 December 1969 Abbey Road regained top place for a further six week run. On 7 February 1970 it was replaced by Led Zeppelin II.

                    On the New Musical Express chart (now a Top 20)it entered straight at 1 on 4 October 1969, replacing Johnny Cash’s Johhny Cash At St Quentin LP. It held number 1 for 18 weeks, the final week sharing top place with Tamla Mowtown Volume 3 compilation LP. On 7 February 1970 it was replaced by Led Zeppelin II.

                    On The Top Pops / Music Now (now a Top 20) chart it entered straight at 1 on 4 October 1969, replacing the Johnny Cash At St Quentin LP. It held number 1 for 12 weeks before making way for the Rolling Stones Let It Bleed LP on 27 December 1969.


                    WEEKS AT NUMBER 1

                    M.M = 20 B.M.R.B = 11 + 6 = Total of 17 weeks.

                    N.M.E = 18 T.P / M.N = 12



                    The critically regarded Abbey Road LP was another huge seller in the UK clearing over 800,000 copies to the end of 1970.



                    * * *



                    LET IT BE (1970)

                    Let It Be entered the Melody Maker (now a Top 30) it entered at 3 on 23 May 1970. The following week of 30 May 1970 it stuck at number 3, and then the next week of 6 June 1970 it replaced the Simon and Garfunkel LP Bridge Over Troubled Water at number 1. It held top spot for eight weeks before Bridge Over Troubled Water regained top spot on 1 August 1970.

                    On the British Market Research Bureau chart it entered straight at 1 on 23 May 1970, replacing Bridge Over Troubled Water. It held number 1 for just three weeks before the Simon and Garfunkel classic took back the top spot.

                    Let It Be entered the New Musical Express chart a week earlier than all other listings. It entered at 3 on 16 May 1970. Following positions were 2 and 2 before it replaced Bridge Over Troubled Water at number 1 on 6 June 1970. It held top place for an initial run of three weeks before Bridge Over Troubled Water climbed back to the top on 27 June 1970. Let It Be regained number 1 from Simon and Garfunkel for the week of 18 July 1970, before making way again for Bridge Over Troubled Water. It climbed back to the top a third time on 1 August 1970, besting the Bridge album for another two weeks, and six in total. On 15 August 1970 Bridge Over Troubled Water took over at number 1 again.

                    On the Music Now (now a Top 30 chart) it entered at 2 on 23 May 1970. It replaced Bridge Over Troubled Water at number 1 the following week of 30 May 1970 for four weeks. On 4 July 1970 it was (surprisingly) the Who LP Live At Leeds which toppled Let It Be.


                    WEEKS AT NUMBER 1

                    M.M = 8 B.M.R.B = 3 N.M.E = 3 + 1 + 2 = Total of 6 weeks. M.N = 4


                    Let It Be was a boxed set on its initial May 1970 release. The extra expense this incurred buyers lessened sales at first, hence the LP only entering the BMRB chart straight at number 1. Even so it still sold well over 300,000 in six months on release. In November 1970 the Box Set with booklet was discontinued and the LP was released only in the regular single LP sleeve. This helped sales over 1971-72 to just over 500,000 UK copies.



                    * * * * * *
                    IN CONCLUSION.

                    The Beatles bestrode the 1963 to 1970 LP charts like a colossus. Before them only Elvis Presley, Cliff Richard and the Shadows had managed to nudge out the soundtrack LPs such as South Pacific and West Side Story from near total dominance of the LP chart and the number 1 position in particular.

                    Once the group had reached the top of the UK LP charts in early 1963 only the Sound Of Music soundtrack seemed to be any real competition. Even their nearest competitors the Rolling Stones paled in comparison in weeks held at number 1. The Stones were a long way back in weeks at the top with only their first two LPs and their fourth release Aftermath garnering a number of weeks top.

                    Beatles LPs were huge sellers in comparison to other LPs in the 1960s. Only The Sound Of Music and West Side Story soundtracks had comparable sales figures and both took at least three years to close on a million sales. No Rolling Stones LP even reached 500,000 sales in that period, the Stones biggest seller-their first LP sold just over 400,000 in the 1960s.

                    The Record Retailer as with its singles chart was yet again out of step in first week of entry. Only Help, Revolver and The Beatles double set entered straight at 1 on the Retailer chart, and the double set only because of a weeks delay in the Retailer chart.

                    Concerning weeks at the top in the three major charts (Melody Maker, Record Retailer and New Musical Express) only the Sgt Pepper LP fared better in the Record Retailer chart for weeks at number 1. The Beatles LPs tended to fare better on the Melody Maker chart.

                    Finally! Here is a list of Beatles LPs at number 1 on the three major LP charts of the 1960s with cumulative total at the bottom of each table.


                    MM RR / BMRB NME NME


                    Please Please Me 30 30 29

                    With The Beatles 22 21 21

                    A Hard Days Night 21 21 21

                    Beatles For Sale 15 11 9

                    Help 15 9 11

                    Rubber Soul 13 8 12

                    Revolver 9 7 7

                    Sgt Peppers Lonely 22 27 22
                    Hearts Club Band

                    The Beatles 11 8 9

                    Abbey Road 20 17 18

                    Let It Be 8 3 6

                    ___ ___ ___
                    Total 186_ 162 165

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Selling more than 800,000 copies it dominated the top of the album charts throughout the summer and autumn of 1964.
                      and
                      A Hard Days Night had advance orders of 250,000. It wasn’t as big a seller as With The Beatles but it still sold well over 600,000 copies.
                      Dates would help clarify sales figures.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I will extract the sales figures from your posts.

                        SINGLES
                        Love me do 100,000
                        Please please me 300,000
                        From me to you 600,000
                        Twist and Shout E.P 800,000
                        She loves you 1,800,000
                        I Want To Hold Your Hand 1m plus
                        Can’t Buy Me love 1,500,000
                        A Hard Day’s Night 900,000
                        I Feel Fine 1,400,000
                        Ticket To Ride 750,000
                        Help 800,000
                        Day Tripper/We Can Work It Out 1,350,000
                        Paperback Writer 500,000
                        Yellow Submarine/Eleanor Rigby 600,000
                        Strawberry Fields Forever/Penny Lane 500,000
                        All You Need Is Love 600,000
                        Hello Goodbye 780,000
                        Magical Mystery Tour E.P. 500,000
                        Lady Madonna 300,000
                        Hey Jude 800,000
                        Get Back 550,000
                        The Ballad of John and Yoko 300,000
                        Something/Come Together less than 250,000
                        Let It Be 250,000

                        I assume these are initial 1960s sales and don't include re-issues.

                        ALBUMS
                        Please please me 600,000
                        With The Beatles 1m by 1965
                        A Hard Day's Night well over 800,000
                        Beatles For Sale 900,000
                        Help 700,000
                        Rubber Soul 500,000 plus
                        Revolver 500,000
                        Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band 900,000 by mid-1968, million by early 1973
                        The Beatles 500,000 plus
                        Abbey Road 800,000 by end of 1970
                        Let it be 500,000

                        Again I assume initial sales figures during the 1960s decade.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          "She Loves You" didn't sell 1.800.000 in the 1960s!

                          According to one of my copies of DISC, it reached 1.527.000 by the end of 1965 and "I Want to Hold Your Hand" 1.509.000 which are the two figures quoted by many Beatles biograhers over the years until EMI released later figures which tallied sales to the 2.000s.

                          Ken Dodd's "Tears" actually surpassed them till 1968!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            A reader who was a shareholder of EMI wrote to DISC in March 1967 with figures they claimed were from EMI that stated "Yellow Submarine / Eleonor Rigby" had only sold just over 450. 000 wheras "Strawberry Field/ Penny Lane" had cleared half million figure! Wether that was the case - who knows!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              From NME 6th March 1964.



                              IWTHYH sales of well over 1,600,000.

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                Which proves that there were lots of conflicting reports on record sales in various music & trade papers in the 1960s. Personally, I believe the 1.509.000 figure which was end of 1965 and that IWTHYH passed 1.600.000 in early 1968.

                                We really need authentic audited figures to prove it one way or another. Dimitri Coryton told me that when he was collatting figures for his book EMI had lots of well audited sales for Cliff- but other Columbia/Parlophone/HMV artists were by no means as well documented!

                                1960s sales figures are always a minefield! Look at the mess Joseph Murrells got into- and Dimitri hit the buffers a few times (Easybeats UK Silver Disc?) Ah well! :(

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  It's intriguing to observe how in a number of Beatles examples the release charted a week or two earlier in RR's Top 50 than in MM's. In charts that were only Top 30s one can apperciate there'd be a time lag of a couple of weeks while the disc ascended towards its peak, but it doesn't explain why "Love Me Do" for example arrived in RR on 13 October 1962 at No 49, but not in MM until 27 Oct '62 at No 48 - and it had made it to No 27 in NME's Top 30 of the same date! "Please Please Me" appears in RR dated 19 Jan '63, but not until 2 Feb for MM, and so on.

                                  I appreciate as much as anyone here that chart runs were erratic and reported differently during that time for a range of reasons, but I'm surprised that RR debuts for earlier hits appeared to arrive sooner than those of MM, especially as we now know that the latter's sample size was so much greater than the former's, which if anything should mean an earlier debut in MM?!

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    Gambo! If you check the "Please, Please Me" section; It does enter the MM top 50 on 19th January! It was in the Disc chart (Top 30) where it didn't enter until February!

                                    With "Love Me Do" It just depends which shops were returning to RR or MM. The bottom sections of top 50s in the 1960s were `very` irregular areas indeed!

                                    Comment

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