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Akini's Top 100 Albums of All-Time [2022 Edition: #22]

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  • #26
    Originally posted by RayRay View Post
    Faith is my favorite George Michael solo album. I prefer the Wham! albums though.
    George is still very much missed. Such a wonderful voice and great songwriter.
    He did write some timeless songs indeed. My most-played song from him is actually "Careless Whisper".
    Akini's Top 100 Albums of All-Time: [#22]
    Akini's Favourite Music Videos: [95-91]
    Your Billboard Top Ten: #1 Anti-Hero (3 weeks)
    AlbumClash 2.0: [Rina Sawayama vs. Rosalía]

    History doesn't repeat itself, but it rhymes.

    Comment


    • #27
      096. Tina Turner - Private Dancer



      'Private Dancer' is oftentimes referred to as the greatest comeback in music history, but that statement would suggest that there was a level of commercial success and GP acknowledgement to which the great rock and roll legend was returning, which was not the case. Tina had scored a singular top 40 album during her tenure with Ike and after branching off on a solo venture in the mid-70s, she released four albums, three of which had no US impact and one peaking at #155. Her label, United Artists, defuncted, in 1980, which left Tina Turner unsigned and performing cabaret shows to put food on the table for her sons and sustain herself. It would be her high-energy, passionate live performances that would draw interest from high-profile celebs and eventually position her to find a label exec willing to take a high-stakes bet on a 44-year-old Black woman in an industry that was even more ageist, racist, and sexist than it is today.

      At 10 tracks long, 'Private Dancer' is brief, but packs in its tiny tracklisting frame a mighty punch. Title track "Private Dancer", originally recorded by Dire Straits but shelved because the lead singer felt the lyrics were more suitable for a woman, sees Tina deep in her sensuality and seductress bag. On the cover of the Beatles' "Help!", she's in soul-balladeer form. She dons a third hat, pop-rock empress, on the slightly (but appropriately) threatening "Better Be Good to Me", and dials all the way into her rock and roll default and organic mode on "Steel Claw" and "1984". "Show Some Respect" is a personal highlight for me, with lyrics that perfectly summarise how I feel about healthy, functional relationships. My top song from 'Private Dancer'? "What's Love Got to Do with It". Featuring some of my favourite verses ever, the Grammy-winning masterpiece is perfectly paced with the right mix of fervent denial and barely bridled passion.

      'Private Dancer' was the perfect packaging of Tina Turner to the GP - the production team pairs her raw, snarling vocals with smooth melodies, but also gives her room to ad-lib and showcase the sheer majesty of her uniquely, immediately identifiable earthy tone. At the 1985 Grammys, she won the pop category with "What's Love Got to Do with It" and the rock category with "Better Be Good to Me". 'Private Dancer' would deservedly take the coveted 'Album of the Year' gong and in 2020, the album was selected by the Library of Congress for preservation in the National Recording Registry for meeting the "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant" criteria. It would completely redirect the path of her career and lay the foundation for a series of certifiably successful releases. So, no, it wasn't the comeback of a superstar, but rather the long overdue launch of the queen of rock and roll.
      Code:
      Significance rating: 10/20
      No. 1s on my daily chart: What's Love Got to Do with It [x4]
      Best lyric: What's love but a secondhand emotion?
      Best melody: I Can't Stand the Rain 
      Best video: What's Love Got to Do with It
      Rank in 2010 countdown: NR
      Rank in 2011 countdown: NR
      Rank in 2012 countdown: NR
      Akini's Top 100 Albums of All-Time: [#22]
      Akini's Favourite Music Videos: [95-91]
      Your Billboard Top Ten: #1 Anti-Hero (3 weeks)
      AlbumClash 2.0: [Rina Sawayama vs. Rosalía]

      History doesn't repeat itself, but it rhymes.

      Comment


      • #28
        What an iconic album by Tina Turner, 'What's Love Got to Do with It' is such an amazing song!

        Comment


        • #29
          Folklore, Faith and Private Dancer are great albums! I like especially the last one, Tina Turner her best!
          https://www.ukmix.org/forum/chart-di...-first-edition

          https://www.ukmix.org/forum/chart-di...-first-edition

          Comment


          • #30
            The first two pop albums I bought back in the summer of 1985 where Madonna's Like a Virgin and Tina Turner's Private Dancer.
            My most streamed artists: 1. Mariah 2. Madonna 3. Debbie Gibson 4. Céline Dion 5. Lara Fabian 6. Kylie 7. Whitney 8. Meghan Trainor 9. Ariana Grande 10. Tina Arena 11. Sam Smith 12. Janet Jackson

            Comment


            • #31
              I had no idea Faith was only nine tracks. That's amazing because I think he had five singles from that album, and all did really well. I wish I had appreciated these songs more when George Michael was alive, but I don't think it really hit until he passed and I returned to them. I can kill it singing to Faith

              Tina is another classic 80s staple. It's interesting that you've picked people who we know had such public struggles with their love lives - Tina with domestic abuse and trying a comeback in her 40s and George having to stay closeted at the peak of fame.

              Comment


              • #32
                Originally posted by Benny View Post
                What an iconic album by Tina Turner, 'What's Love Got to Do with It' is such an amazing song!
                Agree with both points!

                Originally posted by vinnie65 View Post
                Folklore, Faith and Private Dancer are great albums! I like especially the last one, Tina Turner her best!
                Glad you appreciate those three!

                Originally posted by RayRay View Post
                The first two pop albums I bought back in the summer of 1985 where Madonna's Like a Virgin and Tina Turner's Private Dancer.
                Not bad first picks!

                Originally posted by cheapthrills View Post
                I had no idea Faith was only nine tracks. That's amazing because I think he had five singles from that album, and all did really well. I wish I had appreciated these songs more when George Michael was alive, but I don't think it really hit until he passed and I returned to them. I can kill it singing to Faith
                Four singles went to #1 and the fifth went top five in the US. "Hard Day" didn't seem to have any impact.

                I have to admit that I went back to the album after George's passing, too, after not giving it much consideration beforehand.

                Originally posted by cheapthrills View Post
                Tina is another classic 80s staple. It's interesting that you've picked people who we know had such public struggles with their love lives - Tina with domestic abuse and trying a comeback in her 40s and George having to stay closeted at the peak of fame.
                Relatable for me.
                Akini's Top 100 Albums of All-Time: [#22]
                Akini's Favourite Music Videos: [95-91]
                Your Billboard Top Ten: #1 Anti-Hero (3 weeks)
                AlbumClash 2.0: [Rina Sawayama vs. Rosalía]

                History doesn't repeat itself, but it rhymes.

                Comment


                • #33
                  095. Mika - The Boy Who Knew Too Much



                  Following his massive 'Life in Cartoon Motion' splash of a debut, Mika offered 'The Boy Who Knew Too Much', the natural part two to the collection, two and a half years later. With half of the songs solo songwriting ventures from Mika and the other half featuring him and a select partner as paired creators, a consistent songwriting style underpins this sophomore effort.

                  The album cover, co-designed by Mika's sister, captures the frenetic spirit and colourful energy of youth. The upbeat, soaring melodies and playful melancholic, stubborn, and optimistic lyricism expound on the theme of thorny adolescence. Album opener "We Are Golden" is the universal misfits anthem, armed with amped rebellious choral support and big, proud declarations. "Blame It on the Girls" broaches the matter of accountability, still keeping the production sprightly and the lyrics rolling and catchy. Unlocked memories fuelled by that fourth drink in "Dr. John", the delicacy of desire in "I See You", queer realisation in "Toy Boy", and romantic misfortune in "Pick Up Off the Floor", the album's themes have universal appeal. He's textbook earnest on "Touches You" and each of the era's three music videos capture Mika's quirky, awkward, card-carrying geek personality. My personal favourite track is "Rain". Already one of my most-played songs ever, "Rain" sounds like a modern adaptation of the brilliant pop concoctions from the 80s, particularly that of legendary Swedish quartet ABBA. "Rain" is the quintessential illustration of Mika's uncanny ability to transform melancholic lyrics into upbeat, uplifting, feel-good anthems bursting with unbridled energy and optimism, fuelled by its synthesizer-run melody. Simply put, "Rain" is essential pop sustenance.

                  'The Boy Who Knew Too Much' was not able to return Mika to his 'Cartoon Motion' commercial peak. It is, however, his best-rated album by critics, as evidenced by its '70' Metacritic score. It's a seamless transition from its predecessor album and would go a long way in establishing Mika's trademark style.
                  Code:
                  Significance rating: 10/20
                  No. 1s on my daily chart: Rain [x16]; Blame It on the Girls [x3]; We Are Golden [x1]
                  Best lyric: If he's 95 or 22,  a boy's gonna do what he's gonna do
                  Best melody: Rain
                  Best video: Blame It on the Girls
                  Rank in 2010 countdown: NR
                  Rank in 2011 countdown: NR
                  Rank in 2012 countdown: NR
                  Akini's Top 100 Albums of All-Time: [#22]
                  Akini's Favourite Music Videos: [95-91]
                  Your Billboard Top Ten: #1 Anti-Hero (3 weeks)
                  AlbumClash 2.0: [Rina Sawayama vs. Rosalía]

                  History doesn't repeat itself, but it rhymes.

                  Comment


                  • #34
                    094. Destiny's Child - Survivor



                    The first DC album featuring the final three-piece formation of the line-up, 'Survivor' was released off the back of the girls' biggest commercial success, predecessor LP 'The Writing's on the Wall'. With all the internal changes, there was concern that the hitmaking train would slow to a stop, but just how did that turn out?

                    Keeping the "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" approach, 'Survivor' sees the ladies straddling the R&B/pop fence. Though she had a handful of songwriter and producer credits on previous releases, Beyoncé's fingerprints are documented on each of the 18 tracks on 'Survivor', so major kudos to her as the album is jam-packed with some of the girls' most classic songs (I do find it incredibly amusing that "My Heart Still Beats" is presented as "featuring Beyoncé", as it gives heavy Knowles, Knowles, and Knowles LLP energy). "Independent Women Pt. 1", lead single and Charlie's Angels soundtrack anthem, speaks on Black women's need to be self-reliant and even goes a step further to celebrate that strength. "Emotion" is a cover of the Barry- and Robin Gibb-penned song, rebranded in the girls' signature new millennium R&B styling with lush layering and heavenly harmonies. "Nasty Girl", with its hypocritical lyrics, creates slight cognitive dissonance for me, but that chorus is too infectious to deny. "The Story of Beauty" is a heartbreaking tale of sexual assault that's become one of DC's most enduring ballads for me. The highlight track, though, is "Survivor". Last year, Billboard ranked the bridge as the ninth-best of the 21st century, but even before that, I loved this response track to critics and detractors. There was a relentless attitude the girls and their team had about their careers and I love the stubbornness, pride, and even grace expressed on "Survivor". It's a regular inclusion on all-time favourite songs lists I compile.

                    This was their last album before the trio went on to solo ventures (before regrouping for one last sendoff) - Michelle would score a #1 US gospel album, Kelly a UK #1 album, and Beyoncé, well she would start laying the foundation for the most critically-acclaimed solo career of the new millennium, but first, this - an album that resoundingly silenced concerns that they'd be a one-era wonder. 'Survivor' is the first album on the countdown to have featured in every iteration of this all-time list. I'll concede that it could have been trimmed three or four tracks, but the highs are dizzying, evergreen, and essential elements of my playlists.
                    Code:
                    Significance rating: 10/20
                    No. 1s on my daily chart: Survivor [x5]; Independent Women Part I [x1]
                    Best lyric: When it's all over, please get up and leave
                    Best melody: Brown Eyes
                    Best video: Bootylicious
                    Rank in 2010 countdown: 50
                    Rank in 2011 countdown: 66
                    Rank in 2012 countdown: 37
                    Akini's Top 100 Albums of All-Time: [#22]
                    Akini's Favourite Music Videos: [95-91]
                    Your Billboard Top Ten: #1 Anti-Hero (3 weeks)
                    AlbumClash 2.0: [Rina Sawayama vs. Rosalía]

                    History doesn't repeat itself, but it rhymes.

                    Comment


                    • #35
                      093. Bruno Mars - Doo-Wops & Hooligans



                      After establishing himself as a first-class hook singer on hit songs "Nothin' on You" and "Billionaire", which would be two big radio hits in the first half of 2010, Bruno Mars got to working on his solo album release. I doubt even his staunchest supporters were ready for what would come next.

                      Divided into two sections - 'Doo-Wops' for the ladies and 'Hooligans' for the gentlemen - this album would be the start of a reliable pattern of Bruno's - mostly killer, no filler material on concise but effective and memorable LPs. There are some high-saccharine songs in that 'Doo-Wops' category that would endear him in no small part to the GP. "Just the Way You Are" is the greatest of these, as its adoringly romantic lyrics and sweeping melody just wrap you in its embrace of affection and genuine appreciation. There's that worryingly masochistic "Grenade" that managed to go diamond in spite of some eyebrow-raising moments of undue self-sacrifice (watching him trudge that heavy-ass piano across the streets of LA just to see his girlfriend making out with another guy gave me secondhand heartbreak). "Marry You", though, is the most sparkling and upbeat of that for the ladies section, whereas "Our First Time" is the most sensual. Interestingly enough, it's the 'Hooligans' half that speaks more to me. "The Other Side" is this sci-fi, mysterious, alluring, and thoroughly exciting collaboration with Cee-Lo Green and B.o.B. and "The Lazy Song" is an ode to that couch potato life that I fall into on vacation and most weekends. My favourite song, though, is the raunchy and raucous "Runaway Baby", a departure from his typical role of earnest nice guy as he leans into his selfish loverboy side to great effect - his "carrot dance" live performances remain iconic to me to this very day.

                      The longest-charting debut album in music history and the longest-charting non-compilation album of the new millennium - the qualification is necessary as Guns 'N Roses' greatest hits album has charted for three weeks longer - 'Doo-Wops & Hooligans', almost 12 years after its release, currently sits at no. 77 on the US albums chart (15 spots higher than his 'An Evening with Silk Sonic' release last fall). It's staggering success that most musicians will never achieve and he did it on swing no. 1, a well-deserved home-run after almost a decade trying to make it to the batter's box.
                      Code:
                      Significance rating: 10/20
                      No. 1s on my daily chart: The Other Side [x3]; The Lazy Song [x2]
                      Best lyric: It's better if you don't understand 
                      Best melody: The Other Side
                      Best video: The Lazy Song
                      Rank in 2010 countdown: NR
                      Rank in 2011 countdown: 17
                      Rank in 2012 countdown: 42
                      Akini's Top 100 Albums of All-Time: [#22]
                      Akini's Favourite Music Videos: [95-91]
                      Your Billboard Top Ten: #1 Anti-Hero (3 weeks)
                      AlbumClash 2.0: [Rina Sawayama vs. Rosalía]

                      History doesn't repeat itself, but it rhymes.

                      Comment


                      • #36
                        The best album from Bruno Mars with the great songs Grenade and Just The Way You Are
                        https://www.ukmix.org/forum/chart-di...-first-edition

                        https://www.ukmix.org/forum/chart-di...-first-edition

                        Comment


                        • #37
                          The Lazy Song is the only song from this album to hit #1 on your chart? I mean I enjoy that one but the mega-hits Just the Way You Are and Grenade are just as fun to sing. What a huge debut from Bruno; I've enjoyed him ever since.

                          As for Survivor, it is the album that birthed one of the greatest-ever sounds produced by a human - Bootylicious - I will never - and I mean never ever - never, never, never tire of that song.

                          Comment


                          • #38
                            Very good Bruno placement here, love this one!

                            Comment


                            • #39
                              I don't know a lot these albums intimately, so I don't have many insights or hot takes to offer, but your analyses are always extremely entertaining/engaging to read regardless!
                              • "Survivor" was a MOMENT (though I recall the gossip being that the lyrics were at least partially aimed at LaTavia and LeToya, in addition to their doubters/detractors at large). It will forever feel like a major Hot 100 injustice that it's not among their No. 1's. On the flipside, "Emotion" feels like one of their most forgotten hits now (especially for a Top 10, though I wonder if the fact that it "only" got to No. 10 is why they didn't bother with "Nasty Girl" in the States)
                              • I never knew that Bruno's debut was titled that way to represent specific "For Women" & "For Men" sections of the album...and I kinda hate that That eyeroll-inducing choice aside, it was such a fun era to watch unfold, but I wish they hadn't stopped doing proper single pushes after "The Lazy Song" (apparently "Marry You" was never actually promoted to radio in the US? Wild that it never got a video either. Granted, he did have a bunch of collaborations and "It Will Rain" out there too). Speaking of "The Lazy Song," that "strut in my birthday suit..." line always got my attention
                              last.fmPaulboard Top 30

                              Comment


                              • #40
                                Originally posted by vinnie65 View Post
                                The best album from Bruno Mars with the great songs Grenade and Just The Way You Are
                                Glad you appreciate the album.

                                Originally posted by cheapthrills View Post
                                The Lazy Song is the only song from this album to hit #1 on your chart? I mean I enjoy that one but the mega-hits Just the Way You Are and Grenade are just as fun to sing. What a huge debut from Bruno; I've enjoyed him ever since.

                                As for Survivor, it is the album that birthed one of the greatest-ever sounds produced by a human - Bootylicious - I will never - and I mean never ever - never, never, never tire of that song.
                                "The Lazy Song" and "The Other Side"!

                                I'm guessing that one's a caraoke fave of yours?

                                Originally posted by britneylinda View Post
                                Very good Bruno placement here, love this one!
                                Such a strong debut!

                                Originally posted by crystalphoenix View Post
                                I don't know a lot these albums intimately, so I don't have many insights or hot takes to offer, but your analyses are always extremely entertaining/engaging to read regardless!
                                Gracias!

                                Originally posted by crystalphoenix View Post
                                "Survivor" was a MOMENT (though I recall the gossip being that the lyrics were at least partially aimed at LaTavia and LeToya, in addition to their doubters/detractors at large). It will forever feel like a major Hot 100 injustice that it's not among their No. 1's. On the flipside, "Emotion" feels like one of their most forgotten hits now (especially for a Top 10, though I wonder if the fact that it "only" got to No. 10 is why they didn't bother with "Nasty Girl" in the States)
                                I'm sure there's a good bit of truth to that, though in my head, I was lumping LaTavia and LeToya in with all other detractors.

                                Originally posted by crystalphoenix View Post
                                I never knew that Bruno's debut was titled that way to represent specific "For Women" & "For Men" sections of the album...and I kinda hate that That eyeroll-inducing choice aside, it was such a fun era to watch unfold, but I wish they hadn't stopped doing proper single pushes after "The Lazy Song" (apparently "Marry You" was never actually promoted to radio in the US? Wild that it never got a video either. Granted, he did have a bunch of collaborations and "It Will Rain" out there too). Speaking of "The Lazy Song," that "strut in my birthday suit..." line always got my attention
                                I'm screaming.

                                I don't wanna go way off tangent, but I do think it's sad how gender/sex stereotypes dictate the way so many people move. From my observations, it seems that folks spend way more time doing what they think they should be doing than just doing whatever tf they wanna do. A lot of people just kinda lean into the pre-programming of it all and it's interesting how businesses factor that into marketing...which only exacerbates the problem.

                                Yeah, I don't think "Marry You" was officially serviced to US radio. I do vividly recall the Glee Cast cover of it doing fairly well (top 40 in the US and top 20 in Canada).


                                Akini's Top 100 Albums of All-Time: [#22]
                                Akini's Favourite Music Videos: [95-91]
                                Your Billboard Top Ten: #1 Anti-Hero (3 weeks)
                                AlbumClash 2.0: [Rina Sawayama vs. Rosalía]

                                History doesn't repeat itself, but it rhymes.

                                Comment


                                • #41
                                  092. P!nk - Funhouse



                                  2008 saw a flurry of releases from many high-profile acts in the music industry, but just how did 'Funhouse' stack up then and now?

                                  'Funhouse', as P!nk's finest albums do, showcases her ability to take on with equal gusto and to dual-pronged devastating impacts spunky pop-rock, fist-pumping anthems and deeply emotional, heartfelt ballads. The album speaks to her separation from her husband so her ability to effectively and convincingly convey both anger and sadness ties perfectly to the LP's theme. As for the LP's originally shopped handle, P!nk originally wanted 'Heartbreak is a Motherf**ker', but that was a tough sell to the label (who thought it'd be an even tougher sell to the GP), so P!nk compromised with 'Funhouse', which conveyed her objective well enough as she considered the underlying creepiness and terrifying nature of a carnival a peerless parallel to love and life, particularly as love/life and carnivals are both marketed as "fun", with some of the more insidious elements buried beneath the surface. As for the 14 tracks that made it to the final CD - P!nk had recorded 30+ songs before culling more than half - there's great stuff that's managed to stand the brutal test of time. From the playful plea in "Please Don't Leave Me", to the supersonic soft rock power ballad "Sober", to the absolute emotional gut-punch of "I Don't Believe You", the album starts and finishes in solid fashion. "Glitter in the Air" proved a critics' favourite and her acrobatic skills showed off at the 2010 Grammys prompted widespread praise of her athletic ability and commitment to live performance art. Though it's not the sleekest track on the album, title track "Funhouse" summarises the album's theme perfectly, as title tracks should, and I definitely appreciate, and connect with, the lyrics of dysfunction stemming from a once-functional union and the desire to "burn it down". My standout song is lead single "So What", P!nk's first solo no. 1 hit in the US. It's brash, rowdy, emotionally transparent - essentially, it's classic P!nk done expertly.

                                  Despite the competitive Q4 of 2008 and only two months on the clock to sell before year-end, 'Funhouse' managed to end the year as one of the top 15 global sellers. In her 'adopted' music market home Australia, 'Funhouse' finished #2 on the 2000s decade-end chart. It continued her streak of commercial successes as she worked towards consolidating arguably the most consistent career of her pop peers.
                                  Code:
                                  Significance rating: 10/20
                                  No. 1s on my daily chart: So What [x3]; Glitter in the Air [x2]
                                  Best lyric: The passion's there, so it's gotta be right, right?
                                  Best melody: Sober
                                  Best video: Please Don't Leave Me
                                  Rank in 2010 countdown: 65
                                  Rank in 2011 countdown: 56
                                  Rank in 2012 countdown: 65
                                  Akini's Top 100 Albums of All-Time: [#22]
                                  Akini's Favourite Music Videos: [95-91]
                                  Your Billboard Top Ten: #1 Anti-Hero (3 weeks)
                                  AlbumClash 2.0: [Rina Sawayama vs. Rosalía]

                                  History doesn't repeat itself, but it rhymes.

                                  Comment


                                  • #42
                                    Originally posted by JSparksFan View Post
                                    I don't wanna go way off tangent, but I do think it's sad how gender/sex stereotypes dictate the way so many people move. From my observations, it seems that folks spend way more time doing what they think they should be doing than just doing whatever tf they wanna do. A lot of people just kinda lean into the pre-programming of it all and it's interesting how businesses factor that into marketing...which only exacerbates the problem.
                                    Yeah, I imagine Bruno just saw it as part of his whole "smooth-operator/suave-ladykiller" throwback aesthetic, but feeling the need to specify that his doo-wop ballads were "FOR THE LADIES" does give off some #nohomo energy I think I'll go spin "Just The Way You Are" and shout out "cause BOY you're amaaaazing" during the chorus...

                                    Originally posted by JSparksFan View Post
                                    Yeah, I don't think "Marry You" was officially serviced to US radio. I do vividly recall the Glee Cast cover of it doing fairly well (top 40 in the US and top 20 in Canada).
                                    Yes! Glee outpeaked the original by a fair margin. The interest from the GP was clearly there, so I'm not sure why Bruno/his label didn't capitalize on it...at all? Missed chart opportunities aside, it seems to have become one of his most enduring/signature songs anyway.
                                    • I was recently reading somewhere about Funhouse having a more profane workshopped title, but it didn't actually mention the original name, so thanks for filling in the blanks! 2008 (well, the late-2000's/early 2010's in general) were an exciting time with A-list Popgals dominating the charts with high-NRG fun, and "So What" was a prime example. I've got a lot of love for "Please Don't Leave Me" too (a fitting companion piece of sorts to I'm Not Dead's "Leave Me Alone (I'm Lonely)"). That "Glitter In The Air" performance was a moment, but some of the lyrics keep me from connecting with it as strongly as Funhouse's other slower singles (I'm extremely OK with Ian keeping his food-covered fingers out of my mouth, thanks) I remember fans online really putting "Sober" on a pedestal back in the day, so I wonder if many still view it as enthusiastically now. Slightly off-topic, but do you know which album beat Funhouse on that Australian Decade-End Chart? (Delta)?
                                    last.fmPaulboard Top 30

                                    Comment


                                    • #43
                                      Originally posted by crystalphoenix View Post
                                      Yeah, I imagine Bruno just saw it as part of his whole "smooth-operator/suave-ladykiller" throwback aesthetic, but feeling the need to specify that his doo-wop ballads were "FOR THE LADIES" does give off some #nohomo energy I think I'll go spin "Just The Way You Are" and shout out "cause BOY you're amaaaazing" during the chorus...
                                      Sounds fair to me.

                                      Originally posted by crystalphoenix View Post
                                      Yes! Glee outpeaked the original by a fair margin. The interest from the GP was clearly there, so I'm not sure why Bruno/his label didn't capitalize on it...at all? Missed chart opportunities aside, it seems to have become one of his most enduring/signature songs anyway.
                                      I think Bruno's albums are really an embarrassment of riches, as far single options are concerned. I think he left a lot of no. 1 songs as 'just' album tracks.

                                      Originally posted by crystalphoenix View Post
                                      I was recently reading somewhere about Funhouse having a more profane workshopped title, but it didn't actually mention the original name, so thanks for filling in the blanks! 2008 (well, the late-2000's/early 2010's in general) were an exciting time with A-list Popgals dominating the charts with high-NRG fun, and "So What" was a prime example. I've got a lot of love for "Please Don't Leave Me" too (a fitting companion piece of sorts to I'm Not Dead's "Leave Me Alone (I'm Lonely)"). That "Glitter In The Air" performance was a moment, but some of the lyrics keep me from connecting with it as strongly as Funhouse's other slower singles (I'm extremely OK with Ian keeping his food-covered fingers out of my mouth, thanks) I remember fans online really putting "Sober" on a pedestal back in the day, so I wonder if many still view it as enthusiastically now. Slightly off-topic, but do you know which album beat Funhouse on that Australian Decade-End Chart? (Delta)?


                                      Yep, it was Delta's Innocent Eyes, though P!nk did also get the no. 3 album that decade with I'm Not Dead.
                                      Akini's Top 100 Albums of All-Time: [#22]
                                      Akini's Favourite Music Videos: [95-91]
                                      Your Billboard Top Ten: #1 Anti-Hero (3 weeks)
                                      AlbumClash 2.0: [Rina Sawayama vs. Rosalía]

                                      History doesn't repeat itself, but it rhymes.

                                      Comment


                                      • #44
                                        091. Frank Ocean - channel ORANGE



                                        An album I only checked out because of Frank's 'coming out' Tumblr post days before the album's release, 'channel ORANGE' would be one of my early forays into alternative R&B and developing an appreciation for it on the same level as the more straightforward R&B and soul cuts on which I was raised.

                                        'channel ORANGE' comes armed with swank melodies and strong lyricism, but perhaps its biggest selling point is Frank's delivery. His singing on most tracks is less singing and and more 'melodic speaking', interspersed with actual, traditional singing. Indeed a number of songs seem like free-flowing thoughts with melodies backing them and he covers a broad list of themes, including unrequited love, lives of excess, recreational drugs, and casual sex. My most-played song on this, as well as my most-played Frank Ocean song overall, is "Thinkin Bout You", which, for me, is his most accessible track. I love his falsetto, I love the lyrics, I love the emotion and vulnerability. The song that went the full nine yards with my soul, though, is "Bad Religion". On all fronts, I think it's the finest thing he's done. Frank tends to play it cool on a lot of his tracks, so him digging deep and giving something as honest and vulnerable as "Bad Religion" connected with me deeply. It didn't hurt that my sister is even more enamoured with the song than I am, so that endorsement (and additional airplay) lifted it beyond some other quality jams on the album. I also like "Sweet Life", where Frank seeks to share the perspective of the world's top 1% earners, and "Pink Matter", which features André 3000 dropping some killer verses and essentially upstaging Frank in his featured act capacity.

                                        The critical acclaim for this was insane, granted, not enough to give him the Album of the Year at the Grammys, but it was the album of the year for several critical publications, such as Billboard, EW, and Washington Post. It boasts an insane 92/100 score on Metacritic and was the Soul Train Album of the Year in 2012. He could release 10 great albums after this and I suspect this will widely be considered his magnum opus anyway.
                                        Code:
                                        Significance rating: 10/20
                                        No. 1s on my daily chart: Bad Religion [x4]; Thinkin Bout You [x3]; Sweet Life [x1]
                                        Best lyric: This unrequited love, to me, it's nothing but a one-man cult
                                        Best melody: Sweet Life
                                        Best video: Pyramids
                                        Rank in 2010 countdown: NR
                                        Rank in 2011 countdown: NR
                                        Rank in 2012 countdown: NR
                                        Akini's Top 100 Albums of All-Time: [#22]
                                        Akini's Favourite Music Videos: [95-91]
                                        Your Billboard Top Ten: #1 Anti-Hero (3 weeks)
                                        AlbumClash 2.0: [Rina Sawayama vs. Rosalía]

                                        History doesn't repeat itself, but it rhymes.

                                        Comment


                                        • #45
                                          P!nk´s Funhouse is a very great album !
                                          https://www.ukmix.org/forum/chart-di...-first-edition

                                          https://www.ukmix.org/forum/chart-di...-first-edition

                                          Comment


                                          • #46
                                            Originally posted by vinnie65 View Post
                                            P!nk´s Funhouse is a very great album !
                                            That it is!
                                            Akini's Top 100 Albums of All-Time: [#22]
                                            Akini's Favourite Music Videos: [95-91]
                                            Your Billboard Top Ten: #1 Anti-Hero (3 weeks)
                                            AlbumClash 2.0: [Rina Sawayama vs. Rosalía]

                                            History doesn't repeat itself, but it rhymes.

                                            Comment


                                            • #47
                                              090. Whitney Houston - I'm Your Baby Tonight



                                              Whitney's career had gotten off to a roaring start, bolstered by two consecutive diamond-certified albums and an unprecedented, yet-to-be-matched, seven-no. 1-singles-streak. How would she maintain the pace with era no. 3? Could she sustain her top American female ranking into the ridiculously competitive 90s?

                                              With a production patterned after the 'in' new jack swing sound of the time, with which Janet Jackson had previously achieved great commerical success with her 'Control' and 'Rhythm Nation' albums, 'I'm Your Baby Tonight' was a bit of a crossover album for Whitney. She'd straddled the R&B, soul, and pop fences on album one, then gone more into the pop sphere for act two, for which she would receive harsh criticism, predominantly from Black audiences. It's rumoured that because of this criticism, she enlisted an R&B cavalry of sorts (LA Reid, Luther Vandross, Babyface, Stevie Wonder) and recorded this somewhat as a compromise album, with sufficient adult contemporary ballads to appease the label and secure comfortable chart hits, but also more R&B cuts than she'd ever had up to this point in her career. As tends to be the case after artists achieve record-breaking success, Whitney also had more creative input on 'I'm Your Baby Tonight' than she'd had on any of her previous releases. She earned her first songwriting and producer credits on this album (she co-wrote Japanese edition bonus track "Takin' a Chance" and co-produced standard edition closer "I'm Knockin'"). Personally, I feel that this was the album where we got a more accurate sense of her identity as an artist and as a person and that comes to the fore on songs like "Anymore", with that trademark sass we would see more of throughout her career. That one being shelved as a single choice when "I Belong to You", "Miracle", and "We Didn't Know" were pushed to radio was an interesting decision. The other singles, though? Classic. "All the Man That I Need" sits proudly among her most sterling and classic ballads and also features one of my all-time favourite live performances. The criminally underheralded "My Name is Not Susan" is fierce, funky, and fun - the way Whitney plays with the re pieces of "respect" and "receive" on the chorus is a simple nuance that adds great flavour to an already fantastic song. My top track, though, is lead single and title track "I'm Your Baby Tonight". The US version is terrific, but the European mix is truly excellent and the agility and scaling Whitney treats us to on the bridge is first-class vocal acrobatics, never overdone, but rich, soulful, and effortlessly powerful.

                                              By 90s standards, this album was an underperformance for the diva extraordinaire, going 'only' quadruple platinum. She'd hardly lose any sleep over it, though, as her next release would shatter records and confirm her status as one of the defining legends of the 80s and 90s.
                                              Code:
                                              Significance rating: 10/20
                                              No. 1s on my daily chart: All the Man That I Need [x5]; I'm Your Baby Tonight [x1]
                                              Best lyric: So show some respect for the love you receive
                                              Best melody: I'm Your Baby Tonight
                                              Best video: I'm Your Baby Tonight
                                              Rank in 2010 countdown: NR
                                              Rank in 2011 countdown: NR
                                              Rank in 2012 countdown: 97
                                              Akini's Top 100 Albums of All-Time: [#22]
                                              Akini's Favourite Music Videos: [95-91]
                                              Your Billboard Top Ten: #1 Anti-Hero (3 weeks)
                                              AlbumClash 2.0: [Rina Sawayama vs. Rosalía]

                                              History doesn't repeat itself, but it rhymes.

                                              Comment


                                              • #48
                                                • Shamefully, the only Whitney album I owned before her premature passing was The Greatest Hits, but that tragedy pushed me to finally properly dive into her catalog, and now I'm Your Baby Tonight stands as my most-played studio album of hers. It wasn't until very recently that I learned about the extent of the late-80's backlash against her for going so poppy/disconnected from the black audiences who'd originally embraced her first (like the Soul Train Awards booing incident) and how significantly that backlash shaped her career from IYBT onward. It's probably that adept genre-straddling you mentioned that helps this album appeal to me so much (I've also got a soft spot for a lot of new jack swing, even though I was too young at the time for it to be truly "nostalgic" for me). "My Name Is Not Susan" is undoubtedly a highlight, and I appreciate you playing peacemaker when it comes to the dueling/divisive versions of the title track Also: apparently you're the reason I knew the Japanese bonus tracks long before Kygo revitalized "Higher Love," so thanks again for that!
                                                last.fmPaulboard Top 30

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                                                • #49
                                                  I only know the 2 singles from Whitney's album but they are both fantastic!

                                                  Comment


                                                  • #50
                                                    Originally posted by crystalphoenix View Post
                                                    Shamefully, the only Whitney album I owned before her premature passing was The Greatest Hits, but that tragedy pushed me to finally properly dive into her catalog, and now I'm Your Baby Tonight stands as my most-played studio album of hers. It wasn't until very recently that I learned about the extent of the late-80's backlash against her for going so poppy/disconnected from the black audiences who'd originally embraced her first (like the Soul Train Awards booing incident) and how significantly that backlash shaped her career from IYBT onward. It's probably that adept genre-straddling you mentioned that helps this album appeal to me so much (I've also got a soft spot for a lot of new jack swing, even though I was too young at the time for it to be truly "nostalgic" for me). "My Name Is Not Susan" is undoubtedly a highlight, and I appreciate you playing peacemaker when it comes to the dueling/divisive versions of the title track Also: apparently you're the reason I knew the Japanese bonus tracks long before Kygo revitalized "Higher Love," so thanks again for that!
                                                    I would not have guessed this one was your most-played Whitney album! I think the backlash also impacted her romantic choices (Bobby Brown) and her decision to move to Atlanta, among other decisions she made, but I do think R&B was a natural fit for her. Thankfully, she never completely deleted pop from her repertoire.

                                                    Originally posted by Benny View Post
                                                    I only know the 2 singles from Whitney's album but they are both fantastic!
                                                    The whole album is definitely worth a spin!
                                                    Akini's Top 100 Albums of All-Time: [#22]
                                                    Akini's Favourite Music Videos: [95-91]
                                                    Your Billboard Top Ten: #1 Anti-Hero (3 weeks)
                                                    AlbumClash 2.0: [Rina Sawayama vs. Rosalía]

                                                    History doesn't repeat itself, but it rhymes.

                                                    Comment

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