Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

It's A Sin [Channel 4 / All 4 / HBO Max]

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • It's A Sin [Channel 4 / All 4 / HBO Max]



    Long before writer Russell T Davies reinvented Doctor Who, he made a huge impact with his 1999 drama Queer As Folk. His new five-part Channel Four drama, It's A Sin, stars Olly Alexander (from music group Years & Years) as Ritchie Tozer, a gay teenager who moves to London at the time Aids began to appear in the early 1980s. The drama, which also features appearances from Neil Patrick Harris and Stephen Fry, follows a group of friends throughout the decade, as the Aids crisis begins to unfold.

    Premiering January 22nd / February 18th on HBO Max
    Trailer:


    Trailer [HBO Max ver.]:


    Sneak Peek:


    Last edited by Ruthymon; Tue January 26, 2021, 04:01.

  • #2
    I'm not a massive Olly fan but this looks pretty good and Russell usually makes great telly.

    The name of his character is a bit of a misfire though... Richie Tozier exists in the IT franchise!

    Comment


    • #3

      Comment


      • #4
        I was just reading about this because of Olly. It looks good; I wonder if there will be a way to see it outside the UK.

        Comment


        • #5
          Yeah cant wait to watch it. If your in the UK, you will be pleased to know all episodes will be available on All4 right after the first episode premieres.

          Comment


          • #6
            Looking forward to this
            Rolling back the rivers in time...

            Comment


            • #7
              First episode was brilliant!

              Olly plays an awesome part.

              RTD is a superb writer, everything he does is fantastic.

              You can sense the tragedy in this one though, already it’s palpable.

              Comment


              • #8
                Go Roscoe!

                Comment


                • #9


                  Absolutely harrowing picture - I hope that this turns into a massive hit for C4 as its telling a really important story in LGBTQ+ history.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    A fabulous first episode of Its A Sin with great acting from Olly and Neil Patrick Harris. Very true to life on the scene but you can also feel the sense of dread building.

                    Episode 1 achieved great ratings -
                    Source Channel 4. It's A Sin episode 1 had an average of 1.9M viewers and 10.7% audience share.
                    Channel 4 confirmed that with a 12.2% share of 16-34 year olds, it was their best new drama launch in 3 years.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I’ve watched the final episode today and I have to say that it’s one
                      of the best television series in a long time, a beautiful telling of a terrible truth.

                      Be prepared to cry, I was in floods for the last two episodes - utterly heartbreaking.

                      Comment


                      • #12

                        a bit NSFW

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          A brilliant review from The Guardian - this is being spoken about all over social media as well, the reviews are amazing for it.



                          It's a Sin review – Russell T Davies Aids drama is a poignant masterpiece
                          REVIEW STARS:*****

                          Humour and humanity are at the heart of this sublime series about London’s gay community in the 1980s, from the creator of Queer as Folk

                          Russell T Davies’s new drama, It’s a Sin (Channel 4), is something of a companion piece, 20 years on, to his groundbreaking masterpiece Queer as Folk. The latter was the riotous celebration of gay urban life as led by three friends broadly representing different stages of exploration as they embraced life as hot single men. In essence it was a gorgeous fantasy, designed to counteract both the historic worthiness and prejudice surrounding such depictions.

                          What it did not do was look much at the darkness out of which such freedom had emerged and which still shadowed the lives of its Canal Street party people. It didn’t, in short, deal with the effects of Aids on the gay community.

                          Davies’s gusto, irreverence, joy or subtlety, it follows the lives of three young gay men, Ritchie (Olly Alexander), Roscoe (Omari Douglas) and Colin (Callum Scott Howells) who move to London. They evolve into – in Armistead Maupin’s lovely phrase – each other’s logical family (along with Ritchie’s university best friend Jill, played by Lydia West) as they commit themselves to the enjoyment of every freedom the city has to offer.

                          But the group arrive in 1981, just as the first reports of a new disease are making their way across the Atlantic. The shadows are starting to gather by the end of the first episode, which is mostly devoted to establishing the characters and their relationships in full measure. It is Davies’s great gift to be able to create real, flawed, entirely credible bundles of humanity and make it clear, without even momentary preachiness, how much they have to lose.

                          The most hedonistic are Ritchie – who has left a loving, unthinkingly homophobic home in the Isle of Wight to study at university – and Roscoe, who had to flee (in fantastically defiant fashion) a deeply religious household set on driving the homosexuality out of him even if they had to return to their native Nigeria. Colin, from the Welsh valleys, is quieter, thrilled by his new job at a tailor’s and befriended by an older colleague, Henry (Neil Patrick Harris), a sweet, gentle man who has been living with his partner, Pablo, for 30 years.

                          Henry and Pablo both fall ill at the same time with … cancer? Tuberculosis? Pneumonia? No one really knows, but Pablo’s mother forces him home to Portugal and Henry is left brutally isolated in a hospital ward. At one point, the doctors think it might be psittacosis, a lung disease contracted from, among other birds, parrots. “You haven’t got a parrot though, have you?” says Colin. “Of course I haven’t got a ******* parrot,” replies his friend.

                          This all takes on a special resonance, of course, in the time of Covid. We can empathise that bit more with the fear, uncertainty and responses rational and irrational to the emergence of a new disease. Ritchie favours denial. Jill, her slight distance from what was seen by many as “the gay plague” giving her a different perspective, begins to arm herself with knowledge. We can also identify with endless, mindless joys coming to a painful halt, the jostling within oneself of reason and unreason – and perhaps in episodes to come, the wrestling with woefully inadequate and incompetent government responses to a proliferating crisis.

                          As the series moves through the decade, the subject matter naturally darkens but never loses its funniness or fleetness. It’s possible some will complain that Davies does not treat the subject as sombrely as it deserves. This is nonsense. Fleetness and funniness are the essence of life, and only by making them as central to characters, as Davies does, can you convey the depth of the tragedy about to unfold. It’s a Sin looks set not just to be to Queer as Folk’s companion piece but its companion masterpiece.

                          https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-r...aids-channel-4

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I've not cried at a show as much as I have this in a very long time. Wonderfully written. Beautifully acted. Fantastic.
                            Rolling back the rivers in time...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Okay, so I watched episode 1 having drinks with a friend and I didn't like it. I didn't like Olly's character at all.
                              I wanted to show him POSE so watched that after and it was much more 'our thing' in terms of vibe and dancing etc
                              I watched episodes 2,3,4,5 yesterday on my own as I'd seen some people talking about it I wouldn't expect i.e. my straight female next door neighbour etc

                              I have never been so destroyed by a tv programme.

                              I watched and loved QAF as I am around Charlie Hunnam's age and it was so exciting being a schoolboy and having the gay scene to look forward to.
                              It was so accurate. Then I watched Cucumber and found it terrible and the obsession with older gays on youth just awful. Especially since the only likeable character was brutally murdered.

                              It's a sin takes the biscuit though. Jill, looks the spit of my cousin who was protesting for BLM most of last year.
                              Once we get over the initial obnoxiousness of young teens going to a new city, living this exhilarating gay secret life and finding themselves. It starts to sink in how, on all levels, it was a harrowing, sad time. Treated like criminals, animals and lepers. The secret meaning they hadn't even come out let alone could talk about having this mystery death sentence. I was in tears from episode 3 onwards as we all know these attitudes. It would be our parents, us, our friends and how they would react/act.

                              Although I never got to like Olly's character (especially his willful transmission). I understood him/it. It was all so so sad.

                              I think it's one series it is better to binge to get the full hit. I hate binging because it can make series and shows lose the impact they may have had yet this one ugh.

                              I just want to talk about it, sorry for the rant.
                              "What goes around comes back around my baby"

                              Comment


                              • #16
                                aaliyahman I remember watching queer as folk when I was 13/14 and having it turned right down and having my finger on the channel button in case I needed to change it. It was the first 'gay' thing I'd properly seen. I remember going to school and because I was a bit camp, I was bullied and this gave them more ammunition. But all in all I agree it made me excited for what was to come. To see that there was a place with loads of people like me. Thankfully that still felt the same 3 years later when I started going to the only gay bar in Belfast alone lol. Sadly I don't think the scene is quite like this anymore.

                                I already want to rewatch this, but I'm not sure my emotions could take it

                                Rolling back the rivers in time...

                                Comment


                                • #17
                                  Enjoyed the first episode, thought Olly did a good job! Love Roscoe and Jill already.

                                  Comment


                                  • #18
                                    I’ve watched two episodes - jill and colin are my favorites. Sad to see the ignorance towards AIDS amongst many in the gay community back then. Kinda reminds me how some people think covid19 is a hoax today.

                                    Comment


                                    • #19
                                      Going to premiere in the U.S. on HBO Max February 18th:



                                      Comment


                                      • #20
                                        This is a masterpiece in every way possible. The very last few scenes made me cry. Another slay from Russell T Davies!

                                        Comment


                                        • #21


                                          Makes me mad.

                                          Comment


                                          • #22
                                            I must be one of the few Netflix subscribers who cant stand bridgerton. I was hoping for a downton abbey but got a lame mills and boon story. But i digress.

                                            Comment


                                            • #23
                                              Originally posted by BehindBreakaway View Post
                                              aaliyahman I remember watching queer as folk when I was 13/14 and having it turned right down and having my finger on the channel button in case I needed to change it. It was the first 'gay' thing I'd properly seen. I remember going to school and because I was a bit camp, I was bullied and this gave them more ammunition. But all in all I agree it made me excited for what was to come. To see that there was a place with loads of people like me. Thankfully that still felt the same 3 years later when I started going to the only gay bar in Belfast alone lol. Sadly I don't think the scene is quite like this anymore.

                                              I already want to rewatch this, but I'm not sure my emotions could take it
                                              Omg I did exactly the same. I went to an all boys school and grew up with my grandparents. I was watching QAF in my room and my Nan walked in on a BJ scene. I couldn’t get up to turn it off (for obvious reasons). I just had to come up with some foolishness like ‘everyone in school is watching this’. I’m still ashamed when in actuality I shouldn’t be, that was the most accurate sex education I have gotten.

                                              I do wish I’d have seen something like It’s a Sin younger because I like we said, it was all exciting then. HIV in the early 00’s was something I thought was ‘in the past’ until I started knowing people having it.

                                              They really should show Its A Sin in secondary schools as part of sex education. It would do a great deal in normalising us gays and also empathising.
                                              "What goes around comes back around my baby"

                                              Comment


                                              • #24
                                                I’ve finished it, couldn’t not, fun and heartbreaking in equal measure. Don’t often cry at telly but this got me.

                                                Episode 3 with Colin’s fate was where it all started spiralling, just so cruel - both the illness and the way society acted.

                                                Loved the scenes where Ritchie’s parents arrived at the hospital, especially the mouthful that woman gave his mum. So well written.

                                                It took my breath away when Ritchie’s mum told Jill he’d died the afternoon before. I was fully expecting final scenes with Jill and Roscoe and I’m glad it wasn’t that predictable.

                                                I liked the parallel between the virus picking more of them off and their call of “la!” fading out.

                                                Jill is a saint.

                                                Comment


                                                • #25
                                                  I wished the series was longer with more things in between..as in, it’s a very good watch and it just ended too quickly for me. Poor Colin.. I wasn’t expecting that reveal about him. Poor his mother too. Jill is a very well acted and written character. At first i thought she was going to be annoying but she was the real hero for me. Ritchie’s mother suddenly turned into an unlikeable character which I found rather jarring.

                                                  Comment

                                                  Working...
                                                  X