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US Box Office Thread - Nov.29: Encanto vs. House of Gucci

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  • 'Shang-Chi' Three-peats in First With $21.7 Million; Clint Eastwood's 'Cry Macho' Disappoints

    In its third week in theaters, Disney’s latest superhero tentpole, Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings, continued to dominate the North American box office. Pulling in $21.7 million over the otherwise sleepy September frame, Marvel’s most recent epic shows little sign of slowing down and it is well on its way to surpassing its MCU stablemate, Black Widow, to become the top theatrical grosser of the pandemic-plagued year as it rocketed past the $300 million mark in worldwide ticket sales. Meanwhile, the weekend’s most high-profile newcomer, Clint Eastwood’s Western drama Cry Macho, bowed quietly in third place with a pokey $4.5 million as the cinema legend’s legion of older fans opted to stay home and stream the film from their La-Z-Boys.

    Still, the story of the weekend—and of 2021 as a whole—is Shang-Chi, hands down. The comic-book extravaganza has proven that Disney’s COVID-era hybrid model (where it simultaneously released its splashiest titles in theaters and on Disney Plus for a $30 premium) is now looking like a thing of the past. In fact, Shang-Chi’s resounding success as a theatrical exclusive led the studio to recently announce that its remaining titles for 2021 (which includes Marvel’s Eternals and Steven Spielberg’s West Side Story) would follow Shang-Chi’s lead and roll out solely in theaters before making their way to its streaming platform a month and a half later.

    Shang-Chi, which is now on track to become the first film of 2021 to break the $200 million domestic box-office barrier, dropped off only -37.5% from the previous weekend. The PG-13-rated movie which stars Simu Liu and Awkwafina earned a $5,331 per-screen average in 4,070 theaters and pushed its domestic box-office tally to $176.9 million. Overseas, the film has added $143.7 million to date, which may sound low, but makes more sense considering that it still hasn’t been scheduled for release in China—one of Marvel’s biggest markets. Its worldwide cume after three weeks is $320.6 million.

    Well below, in second place, was 20th Century Studios and Disney’s surprisingly resilient Free Guy with $5.2 million. The irreverent PG-13-rated action comedy dipped a mere -6.8% from the prior frame and managed a $1,581 per-screen average in 3,288 locations. After six weeks, the movie has compiled $108.6 million domestically and another $189.7 million abroad, bringing its current worldwide box office total to $298.3 million. It’s official: Ryan Reynolds is now a legit international draw.

    Arriving in third place with a slow trot rather than an energetic gallop was Warner Bros.’ latest from director and star Eastwood, Cry Macho. Forecast to debut with receipts somewhere between $5 million and $10 million, the PG-13-rated Western drama about a former rodeo star hired by his ex-boss to bring the man’s son back from Mexico opened to a disappointing $4.5 million. The 91-year-old icon’s loyal fanbase is older and clearly chose to watch his latest film on HBO Max, where it was free to the streaming service’s subscribers. It didn’t help that the film didn’t exactly blow away critics (who gave it a 52% fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes) or audiences (who gave it a lukewarm ‘B’ CinemaScore grade). Cry Macho bowed to a $1,138 per-screen average in 3,967 theaters and tacked on a negligible $350,000 overseas, placing its first-week global cume at just under $4.9 million. For comparison, Eastwood’s last film—2018’s The Mule—debuted to $17.5 million and ended up pulling in $103.8 million in its North American theatrical run. Obviously, Cry Macho will come nowhere near that number.

    In fourth place was Universal’s Candyman, which brought in $3.5 million in its fourth weekend. That number represents an impressive -26.5% drop from the prior session. The latest installment in the R-rated horror cycle, which stars Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, earned a $1,241 per-screen average in 2,820 theaters, putting its four-week North American total at $53.2 million. To date, Candyman has added $13.5 million from abroad, pushing its global box-office total to $66.7 million.

    Rounding out the top five was Warner Bros.’ horror flick Malignant, which scared up a hair under $2.7 million in its sophomore weekend, putting its two-week domestic take at $9.8 million. The R-rated chiller starring Annabelle Wallis as a woman whose visions of brutal murders come true, fell -50.7% from its debut frame. Malignant earned a less-than-hair-raising $765 per-screen average in 3,501 theaters. So far, it has brought in a more robust $14.8 million in international markets, where it should be noted it opened a week earlier. The movie’s worldwide box office total currently stands at $24.6 million.

    Simmering outside of the top five are three indie debuts: Open Road’s R-rated crime thriller Copshop, starring Gerard Butler, opened in sixth place with just under $2.7 million; Searchlight’s PG-13-rated The Eyes of Tammy Faye, which traces the rise and fall of real-life televangelists Jim Bakker (Andrew Garfield) and his wife Tammy Faye (Jessica Chastain), bowed in ninth place with $675,000 in limited release; and Focus Features’ R-rated immigration drama Blue Bayou, starring and helmed by Justin Chon, debuted in thirteenth place with $315,000 also in limited release.

    Finally, there as one interesting box-office development from outside of the U.S., where the highly anticipated sci-fi film, Dune, rolled out in 24 foreign markets. Warner Bros.’ big-budget adaptation of Frank Herbert’s cult novel starring Timothee Chalamet, Zendaya, and Oscar Isaac doesn’t hit theaters (as well as HBO Max) until Oct. 22, but it racked up $35.8 million abroad hard on the heels of its well-received premiere at the Venice Film Festival. Of the territories where it bowed, Russia led the way with $7.6 million in receipts.

    https://www.boxofficemojo.com/articl...?ref_=bo_hm_hp

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    • 'Shang-Chi' Keeps Rolling in Top Spot with $13.3 Million, Passing 'Black Widow' as the Top Hit of 2021; 'Dear Evan Hansen' Disappoints

      Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings continued to own the September box office this weekend, easily holding onto the top spot in North America for the fourth consecutive frame. The Disney superhero tentpole racked up another $13.3 million in North America, bringing its total domestic haul to $196.5 million, putting it ahead of its Marvel stablemate Black Widow as the highest-grossing film of 2021. Meanwhile, the weekend’s only major newcomer, Universal’s Dear Evan Hansen, hit a slightly sour note in its debut, pulling in a disappointing $7.5 million, which was still good enough for second place during what turned out to be a slow session.

      Shang-Chi, which should break the $200 million barrier in domestic ticket sales early this week (becoming the first movie since 2020’s Bad Boys for Life to do so), was the first title to earn the No. 1 spot four weekends in a row since Tenet accomplished the same feat last year. The Marvel movie has easily become the big box-office story of the year as we head into October and its slate of blockbuster hopefuls such as Venom: Let There Be Carnage, No Time to Die, and Dune.

      Shang-Chi’s $13.3 million in receipts over the weekend brought its current domestic tally to $196.5 million (putting Black Widow and its $183.6 million in the rearview mirror). The PG-13-rated film which stars Simu Liu and Awkwafina dipped a modest -38.7% from the previous weekend and earned a $3,361 per-screen average in 3,952 locations. Overseas, the film has added $166.9 million to date despite it lack of a release China—one of Marvel’s biggest markets. Its worldwide cume after four weeks is $363.4 million.

      Well below, in second place, was Universal’s rookie Dear Evan Hansen, which earned $7.5 million in its debut weekend. A star-studded adaptation of the hit 2016 Broadway musical, the PG-13-rated film cost only $27 million to produce. But its underwhelming first-weekend numbers can only be viewed as disappointing, especially since the film was predicted to make $10 million over its opening frame. The coming-of-age story about an anxious high school student caught in a lie that snowballs out of his control features Amy Adams, Julianne Moore, and Ben Platt (who also toplined the stage version). And while the film was hardly a musical misfire on par with the studio’s 2019 dog-with-fleas, Cats, Dear Evan Hansen scored a soft $2,229 per-screen average in 3,364 theaters. While critics pulled out their knives on the film (it earned a 33% green splat on Rotten Tomatoes), audiences responded more positively giving it an A- grade from CinemaScore. The film will need a lot of positive word of mouth to stick around in what promises to be a very crowded marketplace in the coming weeks. Dear Evan Hansen did not open internationally.

      In third place was 20th Century Studios and Disney’s ulra-resilient Free Guy with $4.1 million. The irreverent PG-13-rated action comedy starring Ryan Reynolds slipped a mere -18.8% in its seventh weekend and managed a $1,300 per-screen average in 3,175 locations. After nearly two months, the movie has compiled $114.1 million domestically and a supersized $203.3 million abroad, bringing its current worldwide box office total to $317.4 million. It just keeps going and going and going….

      In fourth place (again) was Universal’s Candyman, which scared up $2.5 million in its fifth weekend. That number represents a decent -28.8% drop from the previous session. The latest installment in the R-rated horror cycle, which stars Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, earned a $982 per-screen average in 2,556 theaters, putting its five-week North American total at $56.8 million. So far, Candyman has added $14.8 million from abroad (where the franchise is less known), pushing its global box-office haul to $71.6 million.

      Rounding out the top five was Warner Bros.’ Cry Macho, the latest film from 91-year-old director and star Clint Eastwood. The PG-13-rated Western drama about a former rodeo star hired by his ex-boss to bring the man’s son back from Mexico tacked on $2.1 million in its sophomore weekend, bringing its two-week North American tally to $8.3 million. The movie, which is also available on HBO Max, nosedived -52.2% from its debut frame. Cry Macho earned a $525 per-screen average in 4,022 theaters and has added a negligible $762,000 overseas to date, putting its worldwide box-office cume at $9.1 million.

      Expect all of these standings to be seriously shaken up in the next few weekends as Hollywood begins to roll out its first wave of big fall titles: Next weekend sees the release of Venom: Let There Be Carnage and the Sopranos prequel The Many Saints of Newark; October 8th brings the latest (and oft-delayed) 007 installment No Time to Die; October 15th will deliver Ridley Scott’s The Last Duel and a new Michael Myers chapter Halloween Kills; and October 22 will introduce Wes Anderson’s The French Dispatch and the sci-fi spectacular, Dune. Let the games begin….

      https://www.boxofficemojo.com/articl...?ref_=bo_hm_hp

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      • Can’t wait for 007 and Dune

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        • 'Venom 2' Sinks Its Teeth Into $90 Million Domestic Debut, Shattering Pandemic-Era Record; James Bond Soars Overseas

          The first weekend in October usually kicks off the cozy sweater-and-pumpkin spice latte season. But this year, it also signaled the long overdue return of the sort of hand-over-fist blockbusters that dominated the multiplex before the arrival of COVID. Hard on the heels of Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings’ record-setting September, Sony’s supervillain sequel, Venom: Let There Be Carnage, shattered all previous pandemic-era benchmarks with a massive $90.1 million bow in North America, making the case that the Hollywood tentpole is finally back. Further evidence came from abroad, where the latest 007 outing, No Time to Die, bowed to $119 million ahead of its U.S. release next weekend. But it wasn’t all good news: While United Artists’ animated The Addams Family 2 scared up an $18 million domestic debut, Warner Bros.’ much-anticipated Sopranos prequel, The Many Saints of Newark, got whacked on arrival, pulling in just $5 million as fans said “fuggedaboutit” to seeing their favorite mobsters on the big screen.

          Although a Marvel property, Venom: Let There Be Carnage is not technically part of the MCU. Still, that didn’t prevent the PG-13-rated sequel starring Tom Hardy from racking up Marvel-sized numbers in its opening frame. In fact, the follow-up outperformed its pre-pandemic predecessor’s $80.2 million debut in 2018 (the original ultimately grossed $213.5 domestically and $856.1 million worldwide). Venom 2’s record-setting $90.1 million domestic bow beat out the most bullish box-office predictions and was no doubt helped along by the fact that it bypassed streaming and VOD venues and opened exclusively in theaters, where it blew past Black Widow’s $80.4 million launch and Shang-Chi’s $75.4 million initial salvo.

          Rolling out in 4,225 theaters, Venom 2 scored a staggering $21,325 per-screen average over the weekend and added another $13.8 million from overseas (it has not yet opened in most international markets yet, including China, where the first Venom grabbed $269 million), bringing its first-week global box-office total to $103.9 million. The film was tepidly reviewed by critics, who gave the sequel a 59% fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes, but audiences were more forgiving with a ‘B+’ grade from CinemaScore. As for Venom 2’s audience, the demographic breakdown revealed that 62% of ticket buyers were male and that 25% were under age 25. No shock there.

          Although Venom 2 dominated the box-office headlines, it was far from the only triumph of the weekend. In the runner-up spot, United Artists’ animated sequel The Addams Family 2 also bested expectations, debuting to a kooky and positively spooky $18 million. The PG-rated follow-up to The Addams Family (which bowed to $30.3 million in 2019), features the voices of Oscar Isaac, Charlize Theron, and Chloe Grace Moretz and was also available on premium VOD for $19.99. The ‘toon unspooled in 4,207 theaters and earned a solid $4,280 per-screen average. Although reviewers savaged the film with a 27% fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes, ticket-buyers gave it a more generous ‘B’ grade from CinemaScore. It has not opened internationally yet.

          In third place was Disney’s Shang-Chi, which added $6 million in its fifth weekend in North American theaters. The PG-13 rated superhero sensation starring Simu Liu and Awkwafina dropped off -53.7% from the previous frame, but still managed to push past the $200 million barrier domestically—a lofty plateau whose only other resident is its Marvel stablemate, Black Widow. Playing in 3,455 locations, Shang-Chi received a $1,747 per-screen average, pushing its total domestic haul to $206.1 million. To date, it has also racked up $180.8 million overseas, putting its worldwide cume at $386.9 million.

          Licking its wounds in fourth place was Warner Bros.’ Sopranos prequel The Many Saints of Newark, an origin story of the Jersey mobsters whose exploits were chronicled on the hit HBO series. The R-rated film, which stars Michael Gandolfini (the son of the show’s late star James Gandolfini), bowed to $5 million in North America. It also premiered simultaneously on HBO Max, which no doubt took a bite out of its take at the box office. Saints opened in 3,181 locations and scored a $1,571 per-screen average. It padded its anemic haul with an additional $2.3 million from abroad, bringing its first-week worldwide cume to $7.3 million. The film wasn’t done any favors by its soft ‘C+’ grade from CinemaScore, although it did grab a 74% fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes.

          Rounding out the top five was Universal’s Dear Evan Hansen, which added a little less than $2.5 million in its sophomore frame. The PG-13-rated musical starring Ben Platt nosedived -67.1% from its debut weekend and eked out a $728 per-screen average in 3,364 theaters. Its two-week domestic total now stands at…cue sad trombone…$11.8 million. It has not opened overseas yet.

          Speaking of overseas, the biggest development beyond our shores was the early international arrival of Bond…James Bond. Daniel Craig’s 007 swan song No Time to Die finally opened after 18 months of delays and date switches in 54 foreign territories a week ahead of its sure-to-be-huge splashdown in North America. With Universal handling international distribution duties, the 25th super-spy outing pulled in $119 million in its opening weekend. Those receipts were especially impressive considering that No Time to Die’s foreign numbers did not include China—one of 007’s biggest markets—where it bows on October 29. For comparison, the most recent Bond chapter, 2015’s pre-pandemic Spectre, debuted to $123 million internationally. Stay tuned for next week, when No Time to Die finally arrives Stateside. It should be a doozy….

          https://www.boxofficemojo.com/articl...?ref_=bo_hm_hp

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          • US Box Office Is Shaken But Not Stirred by James Bond's $56 Million 'No Time to Die' Opening

            No Time To Die, the 25th official chapter in the long-running 007 film franchise and Daniel Craig’s swan song as license-to-kill agent James Bond, spent the better part of the COVID pandemic gathering dust on MGM’s shelves waiting for the right moment to make its way to multiplexes. This weekend, that long wait finally ended. So, did those 18 months of delays and date changes pay off? It depends whether you see the martini glass as half full or half empty. With its $56 million opening weekend in North America, the action-packed tentpole fell well short of box-office soothsayers’ predictions, but it still marks one of the biggest debuts of 2021.

            Originally slated to hit theaters back in April 2020, the eagerly-awaited Bond sequel, pitting Craig’s bruised-knuckle MI6 agent against Rami Malek’s supervillain, debuted to $56 million in 4,407 locations over the weekend, which translated to a $12,708 per-screen average. But with its $250 million production budget (not to mention its steep marketing campaign), the PG-13-rated movie has to be viewed as something of a disappointment next to its $60-$70 million pre-weekend forecast and the $70.4 million that its predecessor, Spectre, opened to in 2015 (the series’ splashiest bow remains Craig’s Skyfall with $88.4 million bow back in 2012). Then again, in his nearly six decades of globe-trotting derring-do, James Bond had never met a foe quite like COVID-19, which no doubt played a significant role in the film’s softer-than-expected debut since so many of the franchise’s longtime fans are older and more cautious about returning to theaters (MGM’s internal polling showed that 25% of No Time to Die’s audience was heading to theaters for the first time since the pandemic began). Also not helping matters: the film’s lengthy 163-minute running time, which limited how many times the film could be shown each day.

            As for the glass-half-full portion of 007’s performance, No Time to Die earned an A- grade from CinemaScore and a rosy 84% "fresh" rating from critics on Rotten Tomatoes. Better yet, the film continued to clean up overseas, where it was unveiled a week earlier than it was in the States. After two weeks, the espionage epic has pulled in $257.3 million from abroad, bringing its current worldwide box-office total to $313.3 million. Perhaps the best bit of news for MGM (and Universal, who is handling the film’s foreign distribution duties) is that No Time to Die still hasn’t reached ticket buyers in China—one of the Bond franchise’s most lucrative foreign markets. It opens there on October 29.

            With no other major debuts this weekend, the runner-up spot belonged to Sony’s instant blockbuster, Venom: Let There Be Carnage. The PG-13-rated supervillain sequel starring Tom Hardy, which grabbed headlines last weekend with its record-shattering $90.1 million domestic debut, fell -64.5% in its sophomore frame, earning $32 million in North America. Unspooling in 4,225 theaters, Venom 2 scored a $7,573 per-screen average in its second frame, putting its two-week domestic tally at just a hair under $141.7 million. The film has tacked on another $43.9 million from overseas, bringing its global box-office total to bit less than $185.6 million.

            In third place was United Artists’ animated sequel The Addams Family 2, which scared up $10 million in its second weekend. The PG-rated follow-up to The Addams Family (which ended up grossing $100.7 million domestically in 2019), features the voices of Oscar Isaac, Charlize Theron, and Chloe Grace Moretz and is also available on premium VOD for $19.99. Dipping -42.2% from the previous weekend, The Addams Family 2 played in 4,207 locations and nabbed a $2,381 per-screen average. Its two-week cume at the North American box office now stands at $31.1 million. It has earned $4.6 million overseas, putting its current worldwide gross at $35.7 million.

            In fourth was Disney’s Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings, which added $4.2 million in its sixth weekend in North American release. The PG-13 rated superhero sensation starring Simu Liu and Awkwafina dropped off -31.3% from the previous sesssion. Playing in 2,800 locations, Shang-Chi received a $1,500 per-screen average, pushing its total domestic haul to just under $212.5 million. So far, it has also piled on $189.1 million from overseas, pushing it just past the $400 million mark in worldwide ticket sales with a $401.6 million global cume.

            Rounding out the Top 5 was Warner Bros.’ Sopranos prequel The Many Saints of Newark with $1.5 million as it continued to struggle on the big screen in its second weekend (it is also playing simultaneously on the HBO Max streaming platform, which may be part of the reason why). The R-rated film, which stars Michael Gandolfini (the son of the show’s late star James Gandolfini), fell -68.8% from its lackluster opening weekend, exhibiting in 3,181 theaters, which translated to a $455 per-screen average. To date, the Sopranos origin story has added $2.9 million from abroad, bringing its combined two-week global gross to $10.3 million.

            Bubbling just underneath the Top 5 was A24’s Lamb, which debuted in seventh place with $1 million. The strange and surreal R-rated indie about a childless couple in Iceland who treat a baby lamb as if it was their own baby and stars Noomi Rapace opened in 583 theaters and earned a $1,715 per-screen average. Meanwhile, with No Time to Die now finally out in the world, blockbuster lovers and box-office trackers are now turning their eyes to the next wave of big-ticket titles making their way to theaters such as the horror sequel Halloween Kills (October 15), the sci-fi eye-candy epic Dune (October 22), and Marvel’s next E-ticket, Eternals (November 5).

            https://www.boxofficemojo.com/articl...?ref_=bo_hm_hp

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            • I think No Time To Die is doing incredibly well in difficult circumstances. The fact they spent around $300m shows why they didn’t just put it on streaming, and I think they’ll be very happy to just break even.
              Bleep Bloop Blop

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              • In Germany, 'No Time To Die' is celebrated as the savior of the cinemas since it's the first real blockbuster post-lockdown. It had 1.2 mio. viewers in the first week. The previous peak of the year was achieved by Fast & Furious 9 (~ 530k tickets sold in week 1). To put things into perspective: Selling 1 mio. tickets in one week in Germany is like selling 1 mio. albums in the US.
                Pro: freedom of speech
                Contra: cancel culture

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                • So far, 'No Time to Die' has grossed $313 mio worldwide ($56 mio in the US and $257 mio outside the US). Not bad if you consider the fact that it hasn't even opened in China yet.

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                  • Originally posted by theMathematician View Post
                    In Germany, 'No Time To Die' is celebrated as the savior of the cinemas since it's the first real blockbuster post-lockdown. It had 1.2 mio. viewers in the first week. The previous peak of the year was achieved by Fast & Furious 9 (~ 530k tickets sold in week 1). To put things into perspective: Selling 1 mio. tickets in one week in Germany is like selling 1 mio. albums in the US.
                    It's similar over here in Switzerland. Huge numbers, already over 115k visitors, already same amount as the total of Fast & Furious 9 which was seen as a "huge movie".

                    I also went to see it last Friday and it's basically the first big movie since cinemas are open normally again. Previously, you had to wear masks and they could only sell like half of the cinema (as there had to be an empty seat between each visitor). Since October, you don't need to wear masks anymore plus they sell all the seats. Felt so surreal going to the cinema like this (and not wearing masks in a building) but also felt so good!

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                    • Happy for you, Tansike! I recently saw 'Free Guy' and loved the cinema atmosphere <3 .
                      Pro: freedom of speech
                      Contra: cancel culture

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                      • Long-awaited James Bond movie No Time To Die makes a disappointing $56m in its opening weekend in the US - compared to $35m in the UK (which has five times fewer people and no vaccine or mask mandates)

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                        • I'm surprised it's doing rather weak in the US. I don't think it has got to do with Covid though. I would rather assume that the multiple delays put a few people off.
                          Pro: freedom of speech
                          Contra: cancel culture

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                          • 'Halloween Kills' Slahes Its Way to the Top Spot with $50.4 Million Bow; Damon's and Affleck's 'The Last Duel' Is a Dud

                            With just two weeks to go before trick-or-treaters head out on their annual holiday rounds, the latest chapter in the Michael Myers horror cycle, Halloween Kills, slayed the competition with a bloody good $50.4 million debut. The bogeyman’s box-office bow was especially impressive considering that the film was also available via VOD on the Peacock streamer and was going up against such splashy competitors as James Bond, Venom, and the long-awaited reunion of Good Will Hunting’s Matt Damon and Ben Affleck, whose historical drama The Last Duel was dead on arrival with a woeful $4.8 million opening.

                            In what can only be regarded as a hopeful sign for this fall’s box-office prospects, Universal’s Halloween Kills topped a theatrical slate that surpassed $100 million in total receipts for the third weekend in a row—the first time that feat has been accomplished in the past 18 months, when the COVID pandemic crippled the movie business. A sequel to 2018’s franchise-refresh Halloween, the latest chapter which once again stars the legendary scream queen Jamie Lee Curtis, scored the highest-grossing opening weekend for a day-and-date premiere (meaning a simultaneous release in multiplexes and on streaming), besting Godzilla vs. Kong ’s $31.6 million opening back in March.

                            The R-rated Halloween Kills is the twelfth film in the hit-and-miss Michael Myers saga that began back in 1978. But the franchise showed new life by racking up a $13,589 per-screen average in 3,705 theaters. Its $50.4 million haul didn’t quite match its 2018 predecessor’s $76.2 million domestic debut, but it still has to be considered a bona fide smash, especially since it failed to win over critics (who gave it a 39% green splat on Rotten Tomatoes) and, to a lesser extent, audiences, who gave the ultraviolent sequel a ‘B-‘ CinemaScore grade. The sequel padded its impressive total with a relatively meager $5.5 million from overseas, bringing its one-week worldwide gross to $55.9. For comparison, 2018’s Halloween ended its theatrical run with $255 million in global ticket sales.

                            Finishing in the runner-up spot was MGM’s latest 007 chapter, No Time to Die, which pulled in $24.3 million in its sophomore frame. Originally slated to hit theaters back in April 2020, the eagerly-awaited Bond sequel, pitting Daniel Craig’s bruised-knuckle MI6 agent against Rami Malek’s supervillain, underwhelmed in its debut session last weekend with a $56 million opening. In week two, the PG-13-rated action-adventure dropped off -56% (roughly on track with previous Bond entries), earning a $5,513 per-screen average in 4,407 theaters. Its domestic box-office total after two weeks now stands at $99.5 million. However, the latest Bond continues to pull in virile numbers overseas, where it has raked in $348.3 million so far. Its worldwide cumulative gross is currently $447.8 million—and that does not include the 007-friendly market of China, where No Time to Die is scheduled to open on October 29.

                            In third place was Sony’s Venom: Let There Be Carnage. The PG-13-rated supervillain sequel starring Tom Hardy, slid -48% from the previous weekend, earning $16.5 million in North America. Unspooling in 4,013 theaters, Venom 2 scored a $4,111 per-screen average in its third session, putting its three-week domestic tally at $168.1 million. The film has tacked on another $115.6 million in foreign ticket sales, bringing its global box-office total to $283.7 million.

                            In fourth was United Artists’ animated sequelThe Addams Family 2, which tacked on $7.2 million in its third weekend. The PG-rated follow-up to The Addams Family (which ended up grossing $100.7 million domestically in 2019), features the voices of Oscar Isaac, Charlize Theron, and Chloe Grace Moretz and is also available on premium VOD for $19.99. Falling a mere -28.9% from the previous frame, The Addams Family 2 played in 3,607 locations and nabbed a $1,994 per-screen average. Its three-week cume at the North American box office now stands at $42.3 million. It has earned $16.2 million overseas, putting its current worldwide gross at $58.5 million.

                            Rounding out the Top 5 was the weekend’s biggest disappointment, 20th Century Fox’s The Last Duel. Directed by Ridley Scott and starring Adam Driver and Killing Eve’s Jodie Comer in addition to Damon and Affleck, the R-rated action-drama hobbled away from its opening weekend with just $4.8 million in North American ticket sales. The film eked out a $1,572 per-screen average in 3,065 theaters and added just $4.2 million from overseas, bringing its first-week global cume to $9 million. The medieval epic with a price tag somewhere in the neighborhood of $100 million couldn’t even point the finger at cannibalization from streaming since it was only available in theaters. Like No Time to Die—albeit to much gloomier degree—The Last Duel no doubt suffered from the fact that its target demographic was older viewers, who remain more skittish about returning to theaters than younger audiences (in fact, 51% of the film’s opening weekend ticket buyers were over 35). Rating a respectable 86% fresh with critics on Rotten Tomatoes and snagging a ‘B+’ CinemaScore grade, the film played well with the few folks who paid to see it…the problem was there just weren’t enough of them. `

                            https://www.boxofficemojo.com/articl...?ref_=bo_hm_hp

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                            • Sci-Fi Epic 'Dune' Debut Spices Up Box Office with $40.1 Million First Place Finish

                              Warner Bros.’ big-budget sci-fi epic Dune spiced up the box office this weekend with a $40.1 million domestic debut. Topping predictions that had the star-studded spectacle opening in the $30-$35 million range, director Denis Villenueve’s eye-candy adventure easily snagged the top spot in North America (where it is also streaming on HBO Max) and continued to clean up overseas, where it has been playing for weeks. But with the movie’s hefty $165 million price tag, will Dune’s performance prove strong enough for the studio to green light its proposed sequel? Only time will tell. Meanwhile, Wes Anderson’s latest indie curio, The French Dispatch, got off to a hot start in the specialty market, where it earned the biggest per-screen average for any film—big or small—of 2021.

                              Dune’s first-place finish was a good sign for a film that was always going to be a tough sell to ticket buyers. Despite a starry cast that includes Timothée Chalamet, Rebecca Ferguson, Oscar Isaac, Zendaya, Jason Momoa, and Javier Bardem, the futuristic movie has a lengthy 155-minute running time and a knotty story about warring tribes fighting over a desert planet known for a priceless natural resource called “spice.” It was also an open question to what extent its simultaneous debut on the HBO Max streaming platform would cut into its theatrical ticket sales. But Dune’s $40.1 million haul surpassed early projections and handily toppled last week’s champ, Halloween Kills, for the top spot.

                              The PG-13-rated film, which was previously adapted by David Lynch in a confounding 1984 box-office dud, scored with audiences (where it earned an ‘A-‘ grade from CinemaScore) and critics (who gave it an 82% fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes). Dune earned a $9,721 per-screen average in 4,125 theaters and has now racked up $180.6 million overseas, where it opened several weeks ago. Its cumulative worldwide box office currently stands at $220.7 million. Dune’s release marked Warner Bros. best three-day tally since it began its day-and-date roll-out strategy with Godzilla vs. Kong in April. It also was a triumph for IMAX, which accounted for $9 million of the film’s domestic gross. The studio will no doubt be keeping a close eye on how the film holds up on big screens going forward as well as its small-screen streaming numbers before deciding whether to pull the trigger on a follow-up.

                              Landing in the runner-up spot was Halloween Kills with $14.5 million. The latest installment in the seasonal slasher saga featuring masked bogeyman Michael Myers and scream queen Jamie Lee Curtis as victim-turned-avenger Laurie Strode. In its sophomore weekend, Universal’s R-rated horror sequel nosedived a precipitous -70.7% from the previous frame, scaring up a $3,890 per-screen average at 3,727 locations. After two weeks, Halloween Kills has pulled in $73.1 million in North America and just $17.8 million from overseas, bringing its two-week global cume to $90.9 million. The film is also available on the Peacock streaming platform. For comparison, the franchise’s most recent entry, 2018’s Halloween, ended its theatrical run with $255 million in global ticket sales.

                              In third place was MGM’s latest 007 chapter, No Time to Die, which added $11.9 million in its third weekend. The latest James Bond sequel (starring Daniel Craig in his last turn in the tux), dropped off -50% from the previous session, scoring $3,122 per-screen average in 3,807 theaters. The PG-13-rated action-adventure has now earned $120 million at the domestic box office and $405 million from abroad. Its combined worldwide box office is now $525.7 million and places the movie in the elite company of F9: The Fast Saga as the only two Hollywood films to surpass the $500 million global milestone this year. Better news yet for MGM is that No Time to Die will finally open in the 007-friedly Chinese market next weekend.

                              In fourth place was Sony’s Venom: Let There Be Carnage. The PG-13-rated supervillain sequel starring Tom Hardy, slid -44.9% from the previous weekend, pulling in $9.1 million in North America. Unspooling in 3,513 theaters, Venom 2 scored a $2,590 per-screen average in its fourth session, putting its four-week domestic tally at $181.8 million. The film has tacked on another $170.6 million in foreign ticket sales, bringing its global box-office total to $352.4 million.

                              Rounding out the Top 5 was the weekend’s only other wide debut, 20th Century Studios' Ron's Gone Wrong. An animated tale which envisions a world where personal robots are all the rage and features the voices of Zach Galifianakis, Olivia Colman, and Ed Helms had a sluggish $7.3 million bow (pre-weekend estimates had it pegged for a $10 million bow). The PG-rated family film had a 2,050 per-screen average in 3,560 theaters despite earning an ‘A’ grade from CinemaScore and an 80% fresh rating from critics on Rotten Tomatoes. Ron’s Gone Wrong added $10 million from overseas, bringing its first-week global cume to $17.3 million.

                              Finally, Wes Anderson’s latest indie release, The French Dispatch, debuted impressively in ninth place with $1.3 million. Rolling out in just 52 theaters, the R-rated comedy about the quirky staff of an even quirkier Gallic magazine (which clicked with critics on the festival circuit and whose chockablock cast includes Bill Murray, Jeffrey Wright, Tilda Swinton, and Dune’s hard-working Timothée Chalamet) earned a whopping $25,000 per-screen average in arthouses, giving it the mightiest per-screen average of 2021. Searchlight’s little movie that could has not opened internationally yet.

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                              • 'Dune' Holds Onto Top Spot in Sophomore Weekend as 007 Opens in China

                                Warner Bros.’ sci-fi tentpole Dune continued to spice up an otherwise bland Halloween weekend at the box office, pulling in $15.5 million in its sophomore frame and remaining the top movie in North America. Meanwhile, a pair of scary-movie debuts—Edgar Wright’s Last Night in Soho and the Guillermo del Toro-produced Antlers—failed to click with audiences despite a roll-out timed to coincide with the spookiest holiday of the year, landing disappointingly outside of the top five. In overseas news, the latest James Bond installment, No Time to Die, finally opened in China, albeit to softer-than-expected numbers due to a wave of COVID-related theater closures in the country.

                                Dune’s hold on first place wasn’t much of a surprise considering that the weekend’s only new competition came from specialty-market indies, but its smaller-than-predicted -62.1% drop-off from the previous frame and the studio’s decision this week to greenlight a sequel (expected in October 2023) are both positive signs. With a starry cast that includes Timothee Chalamet, Rebecca Ferguson, Oscar Isaac, Zendaya, Jason Momoa, and Javier Bardem, the futuristic adventure has been trying to lure audiences into multiplexes by marketing it as the sort of spectacle that needs to be seen on the big screen (rather than on HBO Max, where it is also playing). So far, that push has been mostly successful, with IMAX screens accounting for $17 million of the film’s domestic haul to date.

                                In its sophomore frame, director Denis Villeneuve’s PG-13-rated epic pulled in $15.5 million in 4,125 theaters, which translated to a $3,764 per-screen average. After two weeks, Dune’s domestic box office total stands at $69.4 million. However, the film’s biggest take has been from overseas, where it has grossed $227 million, bringing its current worldwide total to $296.4 million. That said, Dune’s box-office reign should come to an end after this week since the latest Marvel blockbuster, Eternals, opens on Friday as is expected to come out of the gate to domestic sales in the $70-million range despite mediocre reviews.

                                Landing in the runner-up spot was Halloween Kills with $8.5 million. The latest chapter in the Michael Myers slasher saga dropped off -41.2 from the prior frame. Universal’s R-rated chiller scared up a $2,350 per-screen average at 3,616 locations. After three weeks, Halloween Kills has pulled in $85.6 million in North America and just $29.5 million from overseas, bringing its three-week global cume to $115.1 million—not bad considering that the film is also available on the Peacock streaming platform.

                                In third place was MGM’s 007 sequel, No Time to Die, which tacked on $7.8 million in its fourth weekend. The latest 007 adventure (starring Daniel Craig in his last turn in the tux), slipped -35.9% from the previous session, scoring a $2,229 per-screen average in 3,507 venues. The PG-13-rated film has now earned $133.3 million at the domestic box office and $472.4 million from abroad. Its combined worldwide box office is now a hair under $605.8 million, places the movie in the elite company of F9: The Fast Saga as the only two Hollywood films to surpass the $600 million global milestone this year. The bigger headline for Bond, though, came from the film’s lackluster debut in China—recently one of 007’s most lucrative markets. Due to a spike in COVID cases, 13% of the country’s theaters were closed, giving the film a softer-than-expected bow with $27.8 million.

                                In fourth place was, hands down, the weekend’s biggest shocker as FUNimation Entertainment’s anime sequel, My Hero Academia: World Heroes’ Mission, debuted to $6.4 million. The third chapter in the popular international My Hero Academia franchise about a world-saving team of Japanese crime-fighters unspooled in 1,581 North American theaters over the weekend, scoring a $4,050 per-screen average, and edging out a pair of more high-profile debuts that failed to break the top five (more on those in a minute). To date, the PG-13-rated box-office dark horse has raked in $29.4 million from overseas, putting its cumulative worldwide gross at $35.8 million.

                                Rounding out the top five was Sony’s Venom: Let There Be Carnage. The PG-13-rated supervillain sequel starring Tom Hardy, dipped -38.2% from the previous weekend, pulling in just under $5.8 million in North America. Playing in 3,270 theaters, Venom 2 scored a $1,754 per-screen average in its fifth session, putting its five-week domestic tally at $190.4 million. The film has added another $205.4 million in foreign ticket sales, bringing its global box-office total to $395.8 million.

                                Bubbling just underneath the top five were the weekend’s two sad-trombone scary-movie debuts, Last Night in Soho and Antlers, which tied for sixth place as both films wound up with the same $4.16 million haul. The R-rated Soho from Focus Features stars Thomasin McKenzie as a London-based fashion designer who travels back in time to the Swinging ‘60s to inhabit the body of a nightclub singer played by The Queen’s Gambit’s Anya Taylor-Joy. Bowing in 3,016 theaters, the stylish film had a $1,379 per-screen average. So far, it has pulled in $2.3 million from overseas, bringing its global box-office cume to $6.5 million. With a B+ CinemaScore grade and a 74% fresh rating from critics on Rotten Tomatoes, Soho can only been viewed as a disappointment compared to director Edgar Wright’s last feature, Baby Driver, which bowed to a little over $20.5 million in North America back in 2017 on its way to earning $107.8 million in its domestic run. As for Searchlight’s Antlers, the R-rated tale about a folk monster stalking rural Oregon starring Keri Russell and Jesse Plemons, bowed in 2,800 theaters with a $1,485 per-screen average. Antlers has made $2.5 million overseas, putting its worldwide gross at $6.7 million. The film earned a 60% fresh rating from critics on Rotten Tomatoes and a tepid ‘C+’ CinemaScore grade.

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                                • 'Eternals' Opens to a Strong $71 Million in North America

                                  When it comes to the box office, success is relative. For most Hollywood studios, a $71 million domestic opening would be cause to bust out the bubbly and do a victory dance. But when your movie carries the Marvel banner, expectations are sky high. That’s why the debut of the superhero studio’s latest tentpole, Eternals, may seem like a bit of a mixed bag. Yes, the rookie’s $161.7 million global haul over the weekend was the second-biggest worldwide bow of 2021 (behind onlyF9: The Fast Saga’s $163 million), but its less-than-Marvel-ous reception among critics and audiences raises nagging questions about whether Eternals will have the same long theatrical legs as Marvel’s other recent hits.

                                  With early projections putting Eternals’ North American opening somewhere in the neighborhood of $75-$80 million, the star-studded epic about a race of immortal beings fell slightly short of predictions. Still, its $71 million bow ($7.6 million of which came from IMAX screens) is nothing to sneeze at, as it represents the fourth-best domestic debut of the pandemic era, edged out only by three other Marvel and Marvel-affiliated properties: Venom: Let There Be Carnage ($90 million), Black Widow ($80.4 million), and Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings ($75.4 million). Directed by Chloe Zhao, whose previous film was the Oscar-winning indie Nomadland, Eternals debuted in 4,090 theaters domestically, earning a $17,359 per-screen average. The PG-13-rated film, which stars Angelina Jolie, Salma Hayek, Gemma Chan, and Richard Madden among others, added $90.7 million overseas (with the strongest returns coming from South Korea, the United Kingdom, and France). It has not opened in the all-important Chinese market yet. However, it’s worth nothing that several Arab countries, including Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and Qatar, halted the film’s release on religious grounds since it features the MCU’s first gay superhero. The film earned a ‘B’ CinemaScore grade (the lowest of any Marvel film to date) and currently has a 48% rating on Rotten Tomatoes, making it the only MCU film to be tagged with a green splat.

                                  With the arrival of Eternals, the previous box-office champ, Dune, was knocked down to second place. Warner Bros.’ PG-13-rated futuristic adventure pulled in $7.6 million in its third weekend, falling off -50.6% from the previous frame. Unspooling at 3,546 locations, the adaptation of Frank Herbert’s cult sci-fi novel starring Timothee Chalamet, Rebecca Ferguson, and Oscar Isaac scored a $2,148 per-screen average. To date, the film which is also playing on HBO Max has racked up $83.9 million at the domestic box office and a far more robust $246.5 million overseas, bringing its combined worldwide gross to $330.4 million.

                                  In third place was MGM’s 007 sequel, No Time to Die, which tacked on $6.2 million in its fifth weekend. The latest 007 adventure (starring Daniel Craig in his last turn in the tux), slipped -20.3% from the prior session, scoring a $2,055 per-screen average in 3,007 venues. The PG-13-rated film has now earned $143.2 million at the domestic box office and $524.3 million abroad. Its combined worldwide box office is $667.5 million. The biggest Bond news of the weekend was the announcement that No Time to Die would become available for rental on premium VOD outlets this week for $19.99.

                                  In fourth place was Sony’s Venom: Let There Be Carnage. The PG-13-rated supervillain sequel starring Tom Hardy, dipped -22.4% from the previous weekend, pulling in $4.5 million in North America. Playing in 2,640 theaters, the movie scored a $1,691 per-screen average in its sixth session, putting its six-week domestic tally at $197 million. The film has added another $227.6 million in foreign ticket sales, bringing its global box-office total to $424.6 million.

                                  Rounding out the top five was 20th Century Studio’s Ron’s Gone Wrong. The PG-rated animated family film about a boy and his malfunctioning mobile device earned $3.6 million in its third weekend in theaters, slipping just -3.8% from the previous weekend. The movie which features the voice of Zach Galifianakis scored a $1,358 per-screen average at 2,650 locations. Its domestic box-office tally now sits at $17.6 million and it has added $28.9 million abroad, bringing its global cume to $46.5 million.

                                  On a final note, one of the upcoming awards season’s most hotly anticipated contenders, the impressionistic Princess Diana character study Spencer, opened in eighth place with $2.2 million. The R-rated arthouse drama from Neon which stars Kristen Stewart as the tragic royal bowed in 996 theaters and scored a $2,156 per-screen average. Critics have mostly swooned for the off-beat film, giving it an 85% fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes. Spencer has not been released internationally yet.

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                                  • Marvel's 'Eternals' Hold Off 'Clifford the Big Red Dog' for the Top Spot

                                    There were no massive surprises at the box office this weekend as Marvel’s splashy superhero tentpole, Eternals, added $27.5 million in its sophomore outing, holding off a surprisingly strong $16.4 million debut from Paramount’s family-friendly canine film, Clifford the Big Red Dog, atop the domestic charts during an otherwise sleepy weekend. Meanwhile, Kenneth Branagh’s buzzy coming-of-age drama, Belfast, officially entered the awards-season derby in limited release, snagging an eighth-place finish with $1.8 million.

                                    Despite less-than-stellar reviews (it’s the first Marvel film with a “rotten” rating on the Rotten Tomatoes aggregator site) and mediocre word of mouth (based on its soft ‘B’ CinemaScore grade), director Chloe Zhao’s Eternals remained the No. 1 film in North America in its second weekend, despite sliding -61.4% from the previous frame. That sophomore slump places the film between the second-weekend dips of its recent Marvel stablemates Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings (-52%) and Black Widow (-67%). The PG-13-rated film, which stars Angelina Jolie, Salma Hayek, Gemma Chan, and Richard Madden among others, played in 4,090 locations and earned a $6,723 per-screen average. After two weeks, the blockbuster-wannabe has racked up $118.8 million domestically and has pulled in another $162.6 million from overseas, bringing its current worldwide haul to $281.4 million.

                                    Finishing in the runner-up spot was Paramount’s Clifford the Big Red Dog, the only new contender with a wide release. The PG-rated live-action film based on the popular kids’ book series about a giant, lovable canine bowed (or bow-wowed) to $16.4 million over its first weekend. A Wednesday-opening head start pushed its first-week total to $22 million (those numbers were, no doubt, diminished by the movie’s simultaneous release on the Paramount+ streaming platform). The tail-wagging tale, which stars Jack Whitehall, Darby Camp, Tony Hale, and SNL’s Kenan Thompson, earned a 48% green splat from reviewers on Rotten Tomatoes and an ‘A’ grade from its largely pint-sized audience on CinemaScore. Clifford unspooled in 3,700 theaters and earned a $4,437 per-screen average. The film will not open overseas until next month. However, it has the North American children’s market mostly to itself until Disney’s Encanto hits multiplexes on November 24.

                                    In third place was Warner Bros.’ Dune, which added $5.5 million in its fourth weekend in theaters (the sci-fi spectacle is also currently airing on HBO Max). The PG-13-rated film’s weekend gross fell off -29.4% from the prior frame. Playing in 3,282 locations, the adaptation of Frank Herbert’s cult novel starring Timothee Chalamet, Rebecca Ferguson, and Oscar Isaac scored a $1,675 per-screen average. To date, Dune has racked up $93.1 million at the domestic box office and a far spicier $258.1 million from overseas, bringing its combined worldwide tally to $351.2 million.

                                    In fourth place was MGM’s 007 sequel, No Time to Die, which tacked on $4.6 million in its sixth session. The latest 007 adventure (starring Daniel Craig in his swan song as the superspy), slipped -23.5% from the previous weekend, scoring a $1,611 per-screen average in 2,867 venues. The PG-13-rated film has now earned $150.5 million at the domestic box office and a whopping $558.2 million abroad. Its combined worldwide box office is $708.7 million—making it only the second Hollywood film of the pandemic era to surpass the $700 million global milestone, putting in the rarefied company of F9: The Fast Saga, which topped out at $721 million.

                                    Rounding out the Top five was Sony’s Venom: Let There Be Carnage. The PG-13-rated supervillain sequel starring Tom Hardy, dipped -10.4% from the previous weekend, pulling in $4 million in North America. Playing in 2,538 theaters, the movie scored a $1,576 per-screen average in its seventh weekend, putting its total domestic haul at $202.7 million, making it only the second major-studio film of 2021 to pass $200 million at the North American box office along with Shang-Chi. Venom 2 has added $238.8 million in foreign ticket sales, bringing its current global box-office total to $441.5 million.

                                    Finally, the arrival of the festival-circuit favorite, Belfast, opened in limited release, landing in eighth place. The PG-13-rated coming-of-age story based on writer-director Branagh’s childhood debuted to $1.8 million in just 580 theaters, putting its per-screen average at $3,103. The black-and-white critics’ darling from Focus Features, which has become an early favorite in the Oscars race, has not opened overseas yet. The film, which features Caitriona Balfe, Jamie Dornan, Judi Dench, and Ciaran Hinds, currently has a 88% fresh rating from critics on Rotten Tomatoes and grabbed an ‘A-‘ from CinemaScore.

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                                    • 'Ghostbusters: Afterlife' Slimes the Competition with a $44 Million Bow

                                      Turns out there’s still some life left in those proton packs after all. Following a poorly received, all-female reboot in 2016, Sony’s Ghostbusters: Afterlife slimed the competition at the pre-Thanksgiving box office this weekend, debuting to a much stronger-than-expected $44 million domestic haul. Meanwhile, Warner Bros.’ Will Smith-led awards-hopeful, King Richard, stumbled out of the gate, bowing in fourth place with an underwhelming $5.7 million as the Joaquin Phoenix heartstring-puller C'mon C'mon.soared in limited release.

                                      Thirty-seven years after the first Ghostbusters became the top-grossing film of 1984, the fourth and latest entry in the specter-hunting franchise easily blew past box-office predictions that had it opening in the $27-$35 million range. The PG-13-rated sci-fi comedy directed by Jason Reitman (son of the original Ghostbusters’ director, Ivan Reitman) and starring Paul Rudd, Finn Wolfhard, Mckenna Grace, Carrie Coon, and a few old, familiar faces in cameo roles, unspooled in 4,315 locations and earned a $10,196 per-screen average. That bow was just shy of the 2016 version’s $46 million opening, however the latest version cost considerably less to produce. On a more positive note, though, Afterlife merited an ‘A-’ CinemaScore grade and a 62% fresh rating from critics. And while it is highly unlikely that the new chapter will get close to the original’s $243 domestic tally, its theatrical exclusivity should keep it in multiplexes for a while, where it could threaten the 2016’s $128 million North American take. Meanwhile, in 31 overseas markets, Afterlife tacked on an additional $16 million, bringing its cumulative first-week worldwide total to $60 million.

                                      Finishing in second place was Disney’s Eternals, which racked up $10.8 million in its third week of release at home. The PG-13-rated Marvel tentpole, which stars Angelina Jolie, Salma Hayek, Gemma Chan, and Richard Madden among others, fell -59.7% from the previous frame, playing in 4,055 theaters and scoring a $2,669 per-screen average. After three weeks, the blockbuster-wannabe has racked up $135.8 million domestically and has pulled in another $200.3 million from abroad, bringing its current worldwide gross to $336.1 million.

                                      In third place was Paramount’s Clifford the Big Red Dog with $8.1 million. The PG-rated live-action film based on the popular kids’ book series about a giant, loveable canine dipped -51.3% from the previous weekend and has accumulated $33.5 million domestically after two weeks. The tail-wagging tale, which is also currently streaming on Paramount+ and stars Jack Whitehall, Darby Camp, Tony Hale, and SNL’s Kenan Thompson, played in 3,628 theaters and earned a $2,232 per-screen average. The film will not open internationally until next month.

                                      Limping into fourth place was Warner Bros.’ King Richard with $5.7 in its opening set. The inspirational drama starring Will Smith as Richard Williams and Saniyya Sidney and Demi Singleton as his tennis-sensation daughters Venus and Serena Williams, lagged behind industry expectations which had the awards-hopeful bowing in the vicinity of $10 million. Some of that disappointment, no doubt, can be attributed to the fact that the film debuted simultaneously on HBO Max, but its first-week performance still feels like an unforced error. The PG-13-rated movie bowed in 3,302 theaters and eked out a $1,726 per-screen average. Still, with a straight ‘A’ grade from CinemaScore and a 92% fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes, the film should have fared better. King Richard added $2.5 million overseas, bringing its cumulative worldwide tally to $8.2 million after its first weekend.

                                      Rounding out the Top Five was Warner Bros.’ sci-fi spectacle Dune, which pulled in a little under $3.1 million in its fifth week in theaters. The PG-13-rated film, which is also playing on HBO Max and stars Timothee Chalamet, Rebecca Ferguson, and Oscar Isaac dropped off -44.7% from the prior weekend, earning a $1,242 per-screen average at 2,467 locations. Its total domestic take now stands at $98.2 million, putting it on track to break the $100 million barrier later this week. So far, Dune has pulled in a far spicier $268.9 million from abroad, bringing its combined worldwide total to $367.1 million.

                                      Meanwhile, in just five theaters in New York and Los Angeles, writer-director Mike Mills’ buzzy black-and-white drama C’mon C’mon opened in seventeenth place with $134,447. That may not sound like much, but the R-rated indie from A24, which chronicles the relationship between a radio journalist (Joaquin Phoenix) and his young nephew (Woody Norman), snagged a $26,889 per-screen average—which is the strongest per-location showing of the year, beating out The French Dispatch’s $25,938. And finally, there was one other factoid of note: MGM’s latest 007 installment, No Time to Die, finally vaulted past F9: The Fast Saga to become the highest-grossing Hollywood movie of 2021. After seven weeks, the spy sequel has pulled in $734.1 million worldwide (versus F9’s $721.1 million). Well done, Mr. Bond.

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                                      • Priyanka, who was missing from the first poster of the film but made an intriguing appearance in the trailer, unveiled her character look on Instagram. “And she’s here. Re-enter #TheMatrix 12.22.21,” she wrote alongside the poster which features her dressed in a printed jacket teamed up with loose pants and knee-high boots and her hair tied in braided short buns.

                                        priyanka chopra

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                                        • 'Encanto' Enchants Thanksgiving Box Office with $40.3 Million Bow

                                          The nation’s multiplexes were as crowded as Thanksgiving tables as four new releases battled for a piece of the box-office pie over the five-day holiday weekend. As expected, Disney’s latest animated offering, Encanto, won the festive frame, debuting in the top spot with a $40.3 million bow. Meanwhile, United Artists’ star-studded House of Gucci entered the charts in third place with $21.8 million and Screen Gems’ Resident Evil: Welcome to Raccoon City finished in fifth with $8.8 million as Paul Thomas Anderson’s buzzy indie, Licorice Pizza, set a new pandemic-era specialty-release record with a supersized $84,000 per-screen-average.

                                          Normally a period when tryptophan-dazed families flock to theaters in droves, the five-day Thanksgiving window has been anything but normal since the arrival of the COVID virus. But at least this year’s ticket sales signaled a significant rebound from 2020’s disastrous holiday frame—even if the marketplace still hasn’t quite returned to the pre-pandemic norm. Disney, which chose to sit out last turkey day, got back in the holiday spirit trying to repeat the success of its previous kid-friendly Thanksgiving smashes: 2019’s Frozen II, 2018’s Ralph Breaks the Internet, 2017’s Coco, and 2016’s Moana. And the studio’s latest, Encanto, didn’t quite match those blockbuster predecessors, it did manage to debut in the top spot with relative ease.

                                          The PG-rated movie about a family living in a magical mountain village in Colombia featuring the voice of Stephanie Beatriz and songs written by Lin-Manuel Miranda scored with critics and audiences alike, earning a 92% fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes and a straight ‘A’ grade from CinemaScore. And its first-place finish marks the best opening for an animated film since the pandemic began. The film took in $27 million over the three-day weekend and $40.3 million since Wednesday. Playing in 3,980 theaters, Encanto scored a $6,783 per-screen average. Overseas, it tacked on another $29.3 million (not including China, where it has not debuted yet), bringing its five-day cumulative worldwide total to $69.6 million.

                                          Finishing in the runner-up spot was Sony’s Ghostbusters: Afterlife with $24.5 million over the weekend and just a hair under $35.3 million during the five-day frame. The fourth and latest entry in the specter-hunting franchise starring Paul Rudd, Finn Wolfhard, Mckenna Grace, Carrie Coon, and a few old, familiar faces in cameo roles, slipped a very respectable -44.3% from last weekend and earned a $5,677 per-screen average in 4,315 locations. After two weeks, the PG-13-rated title has scared up $87.8 million domestically and another $28 million from abroad. Its two-week global cume now stands at $115.8 million.

                                          In third place was United Artists’ House of Gucci, which pulled in $14.2 million over the weekend and $21.8 million over the five-day period. The R-rated dysfunctional family drama tracing the downfall of the renowned Italian fashion dynasty and starring Lady Gaga, Adam Driver, Jared Leto, Al Pacino, Salma Hayek, and Jeremy Irons, scored mixed reviews from critics and currently has an underwhelming 61% barely-fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes. Still, audiences were drawn to the dastardly deeds of the rich and famous, giving the rookie $4,092 per-screen average in 3,477 theaters—especially impressive considering the dismal fates of such recent adult-oriented dramas as The Many Saints of Newark. So far, House of Gucci has racked up $12.9 million from overseas, bringing its worldwide box-office tally to $34.7 million.

                                          In fourth place was Disney’s Eternals, which stacked $7.9 million over the weekend and $11.4 million over the five-day extended session. The PG-13-rated Marvel tentpole, which stars Angelina Jolie, Gemma Chan, and Richard Madden, fell -28.7% from the previous weekend, playing in 3,165 theaters and scoring a $2,496 per-screen average. After four weeks, Eternals has drawn $150.6 million domestically and another $217.8 million from foreign markets, bringing its current worldwide gross to $368.4 million.

                                          Rounding out the Top Five was Screen Gems’ Resident Evil: Welcome to Raccoon City, which debuted to just under $5.3 million over the weekend and to $8.8 million in its first five days. The R-rated reboot of the six-film franchise based on the popular video game series stiffed with critics (no shocker there), earning a 24% green splat on Rotten Tomatoes. Raccoon City managed a $1,881 per-screen average at 2,803 locations and reaped another $5.1 million from overseas, bringing its first-week worldwide haul to $13.9 million.

                                          Meanwhile, in just four theaters in New York and Los Angeles, writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson’s coming-of-age awards hopeful Licorice Pizza shattered the previous pandemic-era record for the best first-week performance of an indie film, amassing a staggering $84,000 per-screen average out of the gate. That eye-popping stat was more than triple what the previous record holder, C'mon C'mon, racked up just last weekend. The R-rated film set in the California’s San Fernando Valley during the freewheeling ‘70s stars Alana Haim, Cooper Hoffman (son of the late Philip Seymour Hoffman), Bradley Cooper, and Sean Penn. Licorice Pizza opened on Friday and earned $336,000. It will expand nationwide on Christmas day.

                                          https://www.boxofficemojo.com/articl...?ref_=bo_hm_hp

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                                          • The covid really ruined everything

                                            Just 43M for new Disney ?

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                                            • #1 movie in the US!!!

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