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  • Serby
    replied
    I can only wish teaching was nearly as apprieciated where I come from. Everyone hates teachers, people think tehy only complain, even though they work onyl 20h a week and what not. Not to emntion that street cleaner earns more than teacher...

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  • stevyy
    replied
    Originally posted by Era
    My mom's a teacher and she also takes private tuition classes so I'm used to helping her and teaching Maths & Science to students up to 10th grade. My grandmother is a former government school Principal so it runs in the family haha.

    It's the most respected profession after all (along with Doctors)
    slay!!! and ur father is a photographer... and u are smarty mcsmartshoes. <3

    teachers are awesome.. i mean young, hip, trendy, open-minded, kind teachers. we gonna rule the world one day.

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  • stevyy
    replied
    Originally posted by mrlemonade
    but I do think some people are really naturally great teachers and have more potential and do it effortlessly + one's personality/confidence is also a big thing

    I'm definitely not one of those tho so I'll just have to work harder and longer
    i agree.. i hated all educational courses during my studies.. idk for the history of education and i think it is an unspoken rule and common sense to not psychologically torture kids... hehe... anybody can be a teacher.. all you need is... to like children and the job of explaining things.

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  • Era
    replied
    My mom's a teacher and she also takes private tuition classes so I'm used to helping her and teaching Maths & Science to students up to 10th grade. My grandmother is a former government school Principal so it runs in the family haha.

    It's the most respected profession after all (along with Doctors)

    Leave a comment:


  • Carbon
    replied
    but I do think some people are really naturally great teachers and have more potential and do it effortlessly + one's personality/confidence is also a big thing

    I'm definitely not one of those tho so I'll just have to work harder and longer

    Leave a comment:


  • stevyy
    replied
    Originally posted by Era
    So many teachers on UKMIX<3
    ikr... teaching is the new ukmix mariah... we shud get our own ukmix school of fabulous music taste...and our headmistress is thriller..

    i can bring german, german history and english for 2nd language learners to the table.. i also studied french.. so i can do that as well..

    Leave a comment:


  • ArmyOfMe
    replied
    Originally posted by mrlemonade
    what ArmyOfMe said, I've never had any prior courses or practice when it comes to teaching, but foreign language schools often hire students as well. I'm learning it all on the go

    and now when I'm actually starting to have teaching courses I realize how useless and ridiculous everything here is, and that I would end up having to learn through practice and experience anyway
    Exactly. Keep doing it, I think that's the best way to go.
    The process to teach in public schools is very long here too, but what you often meet is unprepared professors that didn't have enough practice. As I said, it's a good thing to balance theory and practice, also because teaching is such a delicate job that doesn't only require knowledge, but also the ability to interact with people. And no Bachelor or Master degree will teach you that.

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  • Era
    replied
    So many teachers on UKMIX<3

    Leave a comment:


  • Carbon
    replied
    what ArmyOfMe said, I've never had any prior courses or practice when it comes to teaching, but foreign language schools often hire students as well. I'm learning it all on the go

    and now when I'm actually starting to have teaching courses I realize how useless and ridiculous everything here is, and that I would end up having to learn through practice and experience anyway

    Leave a comment:


  • stevyy
    replied
    Originally posted by Timmy94
    In Germany, you need to follow a certain teaching programme that includes 3-5 years of college studies (according to the type of school and the subjects you choose) along with a couple of internships, a thesis and final exams, followed by a practical period taking place at school and some kind of training school that goes on for another 1.5-2 years, which ends again with final exams. And only then, you're allowed to work as an officially recognized teacher - even for primary schools!
    normally, u have to go to university for 5 years (3 years Bachelor, 2 years Masters) and afterwards, you enter a training period of 18 months which ends with a final exam (second State Examnation). You will only get paid fully when you succeed at all tests and exams... I think 6,6k per month is the most anyone could earn as a teacher in Germany. (half of what the chancellor makes each month). I am entering the training period this August.. yay..

    all in all, it takes 6,5 years to finally become a teacher here, which makes this porfession one of highest professions you can have here.

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  • Timmy94
    replied
    In Germany, you need to follow a certain teaching programme that includes 3-5 years of college studies (according to the type of school and the subjects you choose) along with a couple of internships, a thesis and final exams, followed by a practical period taking place at school and some kind of training school that goes on for another 1.5-2 years, which ends again with final exams. And only then, you're allowed to work as an officially recognized teacher - even for primary schools!

    Leave a comment:


  • ArmyOfMe
    replied
    Originally posted by Timmy94
    Originally posted by mrlemonade
    Originally posted by Timmy94
    @mrlemonade: You wrote before that you consider the job of a teacher as possible option for you. Being scared of students' questions is not the best qualification for that job though .
    I'm already teaching lol, I have far from the best qualifications but idc practice makes perfect, I'm young and all that

    and while I'm teaching I'm also actually learning the language because I know everything instinctively but no fcking clue about why something is something in theory. google is my bff. MA Degree in English here I come :'))))
    The teacher training really seems to be pretty loose in Croatia then. In Germany, becoming a teacher is really a big thing with all of its requirements, duties and obligations.
    Excuse me, but you don't know anything about where he's teaching English. He could be teaching it at primary school or even as a volunteer as far as we know, where he maybe doesn't need so many qualifications or theorical knowledge.
    I've been teaching my own language to immigrants as a volunteer for more than a year and a half, and I was in the same situation. I got better with practice, and it's good to practice something even if you don't have a piece of paper yet that states that you can do it. Theory is theory and practice is practice, and the two should coexist.

    Leave a comment:


  • Virgostar
    replied
    Originally posted by truthless
    The "new" in the thread title is... A tad annoying. I don't really get, why the Admin team felt the need, to remove the previous thread completly. But what ever.
    First of all, the NEW part is only temporary. I'm going to remove it soon. In fact, I've just done it.

    Secondly, the old thread is in Test, it hasn't completely gone. Besides, fresh start & all.

    Leave a comment:


  • Serby
    replied
    Because rules are pure theory, can be confusing and I just don't like them nor find them that helpful in some cases. I think my punctuation in German is very good, it's quite simple actually.

    Leave a comment:


  • Timmy94
    replied
    Originally posted by Serby
    Brad, you'll get why I'm mentiong you now.

    Originally posted by Timmy94
    Well, what's there: listing, relative clauses, a subordinate clause seperated by a main clause or two main clasuses seperated from each other. That's pretty much it already, isn't it?
    Is this for English or what? tbh, I'm learning German now, my 3rd foreign language so far and I can tell you that most of the time I don't learn rules per se, it's about getting the feeling for it. What you said now makes close to zero sense to me cuz I don't know what's what.
    No, it was supposed to be for German . Why did you say that the rules are clear if you don't follow the rules but go by intuition? Not sure whether your approach is a good one though since feelings can mislead just as much, while rules are mostly clear (well, some rules have exceptions, but the only thing that helps is to learn them by heart, I guess)...

    Leave a comment:


  • Serby
    replied
    Brad, you'll get why I'm mentiong you now.

    Originally posted by Timmy94
    Well, what's there: listing, relative clauses, a subordinate clause seperated by a main clause or two main clasuses seperated from each other. That's pretty much it already, isn't it?
    Is this for English or what? tbh, I'm learning German now, my 3rd foreign language so far and I can tell you that most of the time I don't learn rules per se, it's about getting the feeling for it. What you said now makes close to zero sense to me cuz I don't know what's what.

    Leave a comment:


  • Timmy94
    replied
    Originally posted by mrlemonade
    Originally posted by Timmy94
    @mrlemonade: You wrote before that you consider the job of a teacher as possible option for you. Being scared of students' questions is not the best qualification for that job though .
    I'm already teaching lol, I have far from the best qualifications but idc practice makes perfect, I'm young and all that

    and while I'm teaching I'm also actually learning the language because I know everything instinctively but no fcking clue about why something is something in theory. google is my bff. MA Degree in English here I come :'))))
    The teacher training really seems to be pretty loose in Croatia then. In Germany, becoming a teacher is really a big thing with all of its requirements, duties and obligations.

    Originally posted by Serby
    lemo

    i don't remember we ever learnt a single thing about punctuation in english. I n german, however, they put commas everywhere, but the rules are clear at least.
    Well, what's there: listing, relative clauses, a subordinate clause seperated by a main clause or two main clasuses seperated from each other. That's pretty much it already, isn't it?

    Leave a comment:


  • Serby
    replied
    lemo

    i don't remember we ever learnt a single thing about punctuation in english. I n german, however, they put commas everywhere, but the rules are clear at least.

    Leave a comment:


  • Carbon
    replied
    Originally posted by Timmy94
    @mrlemonade: You wrote before that you consider the job of a teacher as possible option for you. Being scared of students' questions is not the best qualification for that job though .
    I'm already teaching lol, I have far from the best qualifications but idc practice makes perfect, I'm young and all that

    and while I'm teaching I'm also actually learning the language because I know everything instinctively but no fcking clue about why something is something in theory. google is my bff. MA Degree in English here I come :'))))

    Leave a comment:


  • Timmy94
    replied
    Originally posted by biscuits
    I avoid teaching punctuation. It's hard. I hate it when students ask me about commas
    It is hard. It already is when it comes to the first language, but it's even tougher when it comes to a foreign language that follows its own rules. But then again, the grammar you teach in middle school is supposed to prepare you for high school when you deal with more difficult topics such as culture and literature and you have to speak the language well enough by then for it not to be an obstacle anymore. I mean, let's say you're supposed to write an essay on the American Dream. How to do it if you don't know about punctuation?

    @mrlemonade: You wrote before that you consider the job of a teacher as possible option for you. Being scared of students' questions is not the best qualification for that job though .

    Leave a comment:


  • Carbon
    replied
    I hate it when students ask me anything, every single time I'm just praying inside like please be something I know for sure

    Leave a comment:


  • biscuits
    replied
    I avoid teaching punctuation. It's hard. I hate it when students ask me about commas

    Leave a comment:


  • Timmy94
    replied
    Originally posted by Serby
    I really lover your "German" commas, so cute.
    You mean the "I don't get it, why"-part, right ? Truth to be told, you don't really deal with punctuation that much in English classes at school. I even learned new (at least to me) aspects about it in college, although it could be considered a rather elementary linguistic topic.

    Leave a comment:


  • Serby
    replied
    I really lover your "German" commas, so cute.

    Leave a comment:


  • truthless
    replied
    Depends right?

    I didn't find it funny either.

    The "new" in the thread title is... A tad annoying. I don't really get, why the Admin team felt the need, to remove the previous thread completly. But what ever.

    Leave a comment:

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