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  • Originally posted by Rihab View Post
    Stevyy's state is located at the northern border and sparsely populated, with few cases, no major urban centers and little international travel. Makes sense for them to go back to normal before anyone else.
    with a population of 2,9 million people, we got 2,100 corona cases so far. (growing by 100 on average per day now).

    Corona per 100,000 inhabitants:

    232 - Bavaria
    203 - Baden Württemberg
    193 - Hamburg
    187 - Saarland
    128 - NRW
    116 - Berlin
    109 - Rheinland-Pflaz
    91 - Hessen
    89 - Niedersachsen
    83 - Sachsen
    70 - Schleswig-Holstein *re-opens schools on April 21st*
    67 - Brandenburg
    66 - Bremen
    66 - Thüringen
    51 - Sachsen-Anhalt
    36 - Mecklenburg-Vorpommern
    Last edited by stevyy; Fri April 10th, 2020, 17:40.
    My Chart

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    • This feels completely surreal.
      5.05.2009 / 6.22.2011 / 4.24.2013 / 4.25.2013 / 3.1.2014 / 9.13.2014 / 7.21.2016 / 7.14.2018 / 7.15.2018

      Comment


      • It’s scarily similar to the movie Contagion.
        THRILLER’S SOUNDS OF THE 90s

        Comment


        • Interesting that NRW is only No. 5 on the list after all the headlines about Heinsberg. Guess the Eastern Germans finally have an advantage over Western Germans for once.
          Don't need hindsight
          I'll make my emotions clear
          And then disappear
          With one strike
          (All Saints)

          Comment


          • Originally posted by theMathematician View Post
            Interesting that NRW is only No. 5 on the list after all the headlines about Heinsberg. Guess the Eastern Germans finally have an advantage over Western Germans for once.
            yep, but we must take those numbers with a grain of salt... bc they are from the RKI... and they are like 10,000 cases behind John's Hopkins.
            My Chart

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            • Best "corona" song I've heard so far.
              My Instagram... - Click here

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              • No rice in the stores for three weeks in a row.
                Akini's Top 400 Songs of the Decade: [2-1!]

                Comment



                • after weeks of "Corona"-related songs we also have "Quarantine"-related folk songs being released

                  Originally posted by RayRay View Post


                  Best "corona" song I've heard so far.
                  Waffles are checked cookies

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by JSparksFan View Post
                    No rice in the stores for three weeks in a row.
                    Interesting to know about the situation in different countries. I heard that the Frenchmen would outbuy red wine and condoms now . Germans decided to go for toilet paper instead...
                    Last edited by theMathematician; Sat April 11th, 2020, 10:46.
                    Don't need hindsight
                    I'll make my emotions clear
                    And then disappear
                    With one strike
                    (All Saints)

                    Comment


                    • 5.05.2009 / 6.22.2011 / 4.24.2013 / 4.25.2013 / 3.1.2014 / 9.13.2014 / 7.21.2016 / 7.14.2018 / 7.15.2018

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by KEY9481 View Post
                        The maddest Corona-virus related song (and MV) is this reggaeton one (released back in February, almost 9 million views)

                        Waffles are checked cookies

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by JSparksFan View Post
                          No rice in the stores for three weeks in a row.
                          I'd starve.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Wayne View Post
                            As we navigate through the peak of COVID-19 and things start to get a bit easier, it's quite worrying to think about how long and deep the recession will be.

                            In the last 3 weeks, apparently more than 16m Americans have lost their jobs - that's before the country officially enters recession.


                            In the UK, an expert predicted that unemployment post COVID-19 will double in the short-term and potentially reach 20% if the recession is as bad as it could potentially be.
                            But as soon as the lockdown ends there will be a massive need for hairdressers, plus an increase in spending from the public on having a good time out on the tiles!

                            Some are already making a lot of money out of this lockdown.
                            Education for anyone aged 12 to 16 has made a mess of the world!

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by theMathematician View Post

                              Interesting to know about the situation in different countries. I heard that the Frenchmen would outbuy red wine and condoms now . Germans decided to go for toilet paper instead...
                              Meanwhile Americans decide to go for guns....

                              Comment




                              • Coronavirus: Holby City donates ventilators to London Nightingale hospital

                                The BBC medical drama Holby City has donated fully working ventilators from its set at Elstree to be used in London's new NHS Nightingale Hospital.

                                The corporation shared the news in a tweet, with a photo of workers unloading equipment from a van.

                                Holby City executive producer Simon Harper said they wanted to help "the courageous and selfless real-life medics".

                                The drama, set in a fictional West Country city, has paused production.

                                It is unclear how many ventilators have been donated, or why operational medical equipment was used on set.

                                A ventilator takes over the body's breathing when disease has resulted in the lungs failing.

                                The first of the government's emergency field hospitals to help fight the pandemic was created in just nine days, opening at east London's ExCel centre last Friday.

                                The BBC donated the ventilators to the London Nightingale as the drama is filmed at Elstree studios, in Hertfordshire.

                                Last month, Holby City and another BBC medical drama, Casualty, announced plans to donate protective equipment and other kit from their sets to the NHS.

                                London's temporary Nightingale Hospital is able to hold as many as 4,000 patients and is the first of several such facilities planned across the UK.

                                https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-52250706


                                Love this story. a longstanding BBC medical drama called Holby City donated its medical equipment to help real life medical teams fight the coronavirus.

                                Comment


                                • Originally posted by Colbie View Post

                                  Meanwhile Americans decide to go for guns....
                                  Guns is so two weeks ago.

                                  Now it's hair colorant.

                                  ---

                                  Does the US handling of this crisis seem as big a dumpster fire in European media as it does here?

                                  Comment


                                  • So for the last 2 days the UK has been close to 1000 deaths per day. It sounds like a massive number, but does anyone know how many people die in the UK on an average, corona-free day? It would be interesting to know for context. I wonder how many of these 1000 deaths would have died anyway, or is it 1000 additional deaths to the norm.
                                    1 pnau |2 Gabrielle Aplin |3 Dotter|4 Sofi Tukker |5 Afrojack

                                    Comment


                                    • Originally posted by Rihab View Post
                                      I'd starve.
                                      Same. I eat rice every day so I wasn't going out without a fight. Drove 30 miles this morning to another supermarket and found some.
                                      Akini's Top 400 Songs of the Decade: [2-1!]

                                      Comment


                                      • Originally posted by SholasBoy View Post
                                        So for the last 2 days the UK has been close to 1000 deaths per day. It sounds like a massive number, but does anyone know how many people die in the UK on an average, corona-free day? It would be interesting to know for context. I wonder how many of these 1000 deaths would have died anyway, or is it 1000 additional deaths to the norm.
                                        Here you go - up to end of 2018, the number in 2019 was about 10,000 higher I think (so around 550,000). All the experts say that the figures being reported are scary but a significant number of those who die where COVID-19 is a factor have underlying health issues and many might've died anyway (so the figure is skewed somewhat).

                                        BBC article: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-51979654

                                        Deaths (numbers)
                                        Year Persons Males Females
                                        2018 541,589 267,960 273,629
                                        2017 533,253 262,678 270,575
                                        2016 525,048 257,811 267,237
                                        2015 529,655 257,207 272,448
                                        2014 501,424 245,142 256,282
                                        2013 506,790 245,585 261,205
                                        2012 499,331 240,238 259,093
                                        2011 484,367 234,660 249,707
                                        2010 493,242 237,916 255,326
                                        2009 491,348 238,062 253,286
                                        2008 509,090 243,014 266,076
                                        2007 504,052 240,787 263,265
                                        2006 502,599 240,888 261,711
                                        2005 512,993 243,870 269,123
                                        2004 514,250 245,208 269,042
                                        2003 539,151 254,433 284,718
                                        2002 535,356 254,390 280,966
                                        2001 532,498 253,608 278,890
                                        2000 537,877 256,698 281,179
                                        1999 553,532 263,166 290,366
                                        1998 553,435 264,202 289,233
                                        1997 558,052 266,164 291,888
                                        1996 563,007 269,825 293,182
                                        1995 565,902 272,709 293,193
                                        1994 551,780 266,829 284,951
                                        1993 578,512 279,302 299,210
                                        1992 558,313 271,732 286,581
                                        1991 570,044 277,582 292,462
                                        1990 564,846 277,336 287,510
                                        1989 576,872 281,290 295,582
                                        1988 571,408 280,931 290,477
                                        1987 566,994 280,177 286,817
                                        1986 581,203 287,894 293,309
                                        1985 590,734 292,327 298,407
                                        1984 566,881 282,357 284,524
                                        1983 579,608 289,419 290,189
                                        1982 581,861 290,166 291,695
                                        1981 577,890 289,022 288,868
                                        1980 581,385 291,869 289,516
                                        1979 593,019 297,862 295,157
                                        1978 585,901 295,505 290,396
                                        1977 575,928 289,773 286,155
                                        1976 598,516 300,058 298,458
                                        1975 582,841 294,174 288,667
                                        1974 585,292 295,315 289,977
                                        1973 587,478 296,546 290,932
                                        1972 591,889 300,389 291,500
                                        1971 567,262 288,359 278,903
                                        1970 575,194 293,053 282,141
                                        1969 579,378 296,561 282,817
                                        1968 576,754 293,213 283,541
                                        1967 542,516 277,178 265,338
                                        1966 563,624 288,622 275,002
                                        1965 549,379 282,328 267,051
                                        1964 534,737 274,773 259,964
                                        1963 572,868 292,410 280,458
                                        1962 557,636 285,154 272,482
                                        1961 551,752 280,782 270,970
                                        1960 526,268 269,172 257,096
                                        1959 527,651 269,878 257,773
                                        1958 526,843 270,639 256,204
                                        1957 514,870 266,407 248,463
                                        1956 521,331 267,904 253,427
                                        1955 518,864 : :
                                        1954 501,896 : :
                                        1953 503,529 : :
                                        1952 497,484 : :
                                        1951 549,380 : :
                                        1950 510,301 : :
                                        1949 510,736 : :
                                        1948 469,898 : :
                                        1947 517,615 : :
                                        1946 492,090 : :
                                        1945 488,108 : :
                                        1944 492,176 : :
                                        1943 501,412 : :
                                        1942 480,137 : :
                                        1941 535,180 : :
                                        1940 581,537 : :
                                        1939 499,902 : :
                                        1938 478,996 : :
                                        1937 509,574 : :
                                        1936 495,764 : :
                                        1935 477,401 : :
                                        1934 476,810 : :
                                        1933 496,465 : :
                                        1932 484,129 : :
                                        1931 491,630 : :
                                        1930 455,427 : :
                                        1929 532,492 : :
                                        1928 460,389 : :
                                        1927 484,609 : :
                                        1926 453,804 : :
                                        1925 472,841 : :
                                        1924 473,235 : :
                                        1923 444,785 : :
                                        1922 486,780 : :
                                        1921 458,629 : :
                                        1920 466,130 : :
                                        1919 504,203 : :
                                        1918 611,861 : :
                                        1917 498,922 : :
                                        1916 508,217 : :
                                        1915 562,253 : :
                                        1914 516,742 : :
                                        1913 504,975 : :
                                        1912 486,939 : :
                                        1911 527,810 : :
                                        1910 483,247 : :
                                        1909 518,003 : :
                                        1908 520,456 : :
                                        1907 524,221 : :
                                        1906 531,281 : :
                                        1905 520,031 : :
                                        1904 549,784 : :
                                        1903 514,628 : :
                                        1902 535,538 : :
                                        1901 551,585 : :
                                        1900 587,830 : :
                                        1899 581,799 : :
                                        1898 552,141 : :
                                        1897 541,487 : :
                                        1896 526,727 : :
                                        1895 568,997 : :
                                        1894 498,827 : :
                                        1893 569,958 : :
                                        1892 559,684 : :
                                        1891 587,925 : :
                                        1890 562,248 : :
                                        1889 518,353 : :
                                        1888 510,971 : :
                                        1887 530,758 : :
                                        1886 537,276 : :
                                        1885 522,750 : :
                                        1884 530,828 : :
                                        1883 522,997 : :
                                        1882 516,654 : :
                                        1881 491,935 : :
                                        1880 528,624 : :
                                        1879 526,255 : :
                                        1878 539,872 : :
                                        1877 500,496 : :
                                        1876 510,315 : :
                                        1875 546,453 : :
                                        1874 526,632 : :
                                        1873 492,520 : :
                                        1872 492,265 : :
                                        1871 514,879 : :
                                        1870 514,902 : :
                                        1869 494,828 : :
                                        1868 480,622 : :
                                        1867 471,073 : :
                                        1866 500,689 : :
                                        1865 490,909 : :
                                        1864 495,531 : :
                                        1863 473,837 : :
                                        1862 436,566 : :
                                        1861 435,114 : :
                                        1860 422,721 : :
                                        1859 440,781 : :
                                        1858 449,656 : :
                                        1857 419,815 : :
                                        1856 390,506 : :
                                        1855 425,703 : :
                                        1854 437,905 : :
                                        1853 421,097 : :
                                        1852 407,135 : :
                                        1851 395,396 : :
                                        1850 368,995 : :
                                        1849 440,839 : :
                                        1848 399,833 : :
                                        1847 423,304 : :
                                        1846 390,315 : :
                                        1845 349,366 : :
                                        1844 356,933 : :
                                        1843 346,445 : :
                                        1842 349,519 : :
                                        1841 343,847 : :
                                        1840 359,687 : :
                                        1839 338,984 : :
                                        1838 342,760 : :

                                        Comment


                                        • Originally posted by SholasBoy View Post
                                          So for the last 2 days the UK has been close to 1000 deaths per day. It sounds like a massive number, but does anyone know how many people die in the UK on an average, corona-free day? It would be interesting to know for context. I wonder how many of these 1000 deaths would have died anyway, or is it 1000 additional deaths to the norm.
                                          As Wayne’s shown, about 1400 people a day die “normally”, so yes, a lot of the people dying of coronavirus would’ve died sooner rather than later and this has been an accelerant.

                                          Plus, the daily figures reflect the day the death was reported by the NHS, not actual days, so they’re not as specific as saying “yesterday this many people died” - plus, on the downside, they don’t take into account care home deaths.

                                          The predicted total of COVID-19 deaths in the UK by August by some experts is 66,000 - 0.1% of the population.
                                          THRILLER’S SOUNDS OF THE 90s

                                          Comment


                                          • but 1400 were for all reasons, now we have 1000 for just one reason... if you are at 2400 per day for all reasons together then it's not good, if you are still around 1400 then you have a point
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                                            ENJOY Hits in the Mix! weekly chart @ General Music

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                                            • Originally posted by Leo View Post
                                              but 1400 were for all reasons, now we have 1000 for just one reason... if you are at 2400 per day for all reasons together then it's not good, if you are still around 1400 then you have a point
                                              Exactly.
                                              In one region in France, the death rate in hospitals is up by 269%.
                                              5.05.2009 / 6.22.2011 / 4.24.2013 / 4.25.2013 / 3.1.2014 / 9.13.2014 / 7.21.2016 / 7.14.2018 / 7.15.2018

                                              Comment


                                              • You all are assuming that those people would've died anyway this year. Maybe they had chronic illnesses, but that maybe they would've lived 2-3, even 5 years. It's not just THAT simple to compare the numbers. True effects will be known years after.
                                                I have received many gifts from God,
                                                but this is the first time I have ever received a gift from a goddess
                                                .

                                                Don McLean on Madonna's version of American Pie

                                                Comment


                                                • Originally posted by Leo View Post
                                                  but 1400 were for all reasons, now we have 1000 for just one reason... if you are at 2400 per day for all reasons together then it's not good, if you are still around 1400 then you have a point
                                                  It's not that simple though, as the BBC article highlights - a proportion of that number would've died anyway, that's what the statistics ultimately highlight. We aren't going to know the full impact of COVID-19 until the year ends and you look back retrospectively but the government estimate that the impact of a lockdown will limit deaths to "just" 20,000 (as opposed to 250,000 without lockdown and up to 500,000 with no measures at all). I think the 20,000 is clearly not going to be met as lockdown was implemented later than it should've been, but still the death toll will be much less than it would've been.

                                                  The vast majority of people dying in the UK from COVID-19 have significant underlying health issues - very few people are dying from COVID-19 alone in the UK. See the attached image from the government register of deaths and the 12 week average - the number of deaths is actually declining overall compared to 12 weeks ago...
                                                  Attached Files

                                                  Comment


                                                  • Well that is an interesting graph, so it seems that although the amount of people dying of C-19 is increasing, the total death rate is decreasing... so perhaps this isn't causing the big pile up of bodies we're being lead to believe.
                                                    1 pnau |2 Gabrielle Aplin |3 Dotter|4 Sofi Tukker |5 Afrojack

                                                    Comment


                                                    • Originally posted by SholasBoy View Post
                                                      Well that is an interesting graph, so it seems that although the amount of people dying of C-19 is increasing, the total death rate is decreasing... so perhaps this isn't causing the big pile up of bodies we're being lead to believe.
                                                      It definitely does make you think.

                                                      But, there's a couple of things:

                                                      * The date of recorded death will be behind the date of actual death - there's typically a gap of around 5 days between the two.
                                                      * The last week, the number of people who have died where COVID-19 has been a contributory factor has been the highest yet - so there is likely to be some impact on the dataset in the above graph.

                                                      Be interesting to review this data in 2-3 weeks as the UK navigates through the peak.

                                                      Comment


                                                      • Originally posted by Leo View Post
                                                        but 1400 were for all reasons, now we have 1000 for just one reason... if you are at 2400 per day for all reasons together then it's not good, if you are still around 1400 then you have a point
                                                        Yes that’s why I said the virus has been an accelerant, so it’s not really 2400 a day either. A lot of the people dying of the virus were already unwell and may have died soon regardless, a lot were unwell and may have lived for a while longer, the minority were not unwell at all.

                                                        We could be seeing around 2000 deaths a day this time next week, mostly thanks to the government spending a week dicking about.
                                                        THRILLER’S SOUNDS OF THE 90s

                                                        Comment


                                                        • Originally posted by JSparksFan View Post

                                                          Same. I eat rice every day so I wasn't going out without a fight. Drove 30 miles this morning to another supermarket and found some.
                                                          As my mother is Asian, I used to eat rice a lot. Then when my husband wanted to lose weight, I stopped eating it that often. I can do without rice for months now. I don't think there is any food I would really miss though. There is so much else you can eat.
                                                          My Instagram... - Click here

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                                                          • What is up with these French doctors wanting to test Africans???

                                                            Wanting to give someone who does not have COVID-19 and then test a cure on them is horrifically sick and honestly, those "Doctors" need to have their licenses taken away.
                                                            Last edited by TIfan; Sun April 12th, 2020, 02:44.
                                                            Diva!!!

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                                                            • So Germany admitted that the memorandums of the financial crisis was an "instrument of torture"? Interesting
                                                              jio CHARTS NOW:13/7/2020:https://www.ukmix.org/forum/chart-di...0#post10430510

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