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U.K. Politics: Boris Johnson referred to police (AGAIN) over potential Covid rule breaches

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  • Wayne
    replied
    Still undecided.

    I'm so mad with Labour - they haven't done nearly enough and I actually find myself feeling slightly resentful towards them.

    Leave a comment:


  • Artoo
    replied
    Originally posted by Thriller View Post
    Ageing populations without assets is going to be one of the biggest crisis’ of this century, to the point where it wouldn’t surprise me if mandatory euthanasia at the age of 70 is introduced ()
    One way of escaping the Tories.

    Leave a comment:


  • Thriller
    replied
    Originally posted by Artoo View Post
    I honestly don’t know what the solution is, but something drastic needs to happen because it’s not tenable long term. You’re going to end up with a generation of renters who eventually find themselves unable to work and nowhere to live, little to no pension (opting not to pay into one because they needed to pay rent and live a life), with no equity to liquidate to pay for their social care in old age.
    Ageing populations without assets is going to be one of the biggest crisis’ of this century, to the point where it wouldn’t surprise me if mandatory euthanasia at the age of 70 is introduced ()

    Leave a comment:


  • bm08
    replied
    Originally posted by Wayne View Post

    I am still very torn over who to vote for though one thing is abundantly clear, if I want the Tories out, I have to tactically vote Labour.
    Ive come to this conclusion. It’s probably the best strategy for me through the next general.

    Leave a comment:


  • Artoo
    replied
    I honestly don’t know what the solution is, but something drastic needs to happen because it’s not tenable long term. You’re going to end up with a generation of renters who eventually find themselves unable to work and nowhere to live, little to no pension (opting not to pay into one because they needed to pay rent and live a life), with no equity to liquidate to pay for their social care in old age.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wayne
    replied
    Originally posted by Artoo View Post
    The property market is broken, so I don’t think offering help is going to do much. That scheme where you bought part of your house and rented the rest from the government was nothing short of insulting.
    It really is - I was just looking at home ownership rates and Help to Buy actually did nothing for them really...
    • 2007: 73.3%.
    • 2008: 72.5%.
    • 2009: 69.9%.
    • 2010: 70.0%.
    • 2011: 67.9%.
    • 2012: 66.7%.
    • 2013: 64.6%.
    • 2014: 64.4%. ** Help to Buy introduced **
    • 2015: 63.5%.
    • 2016: 63.4%.
    • 2017: 65.0%.
    • 2018: 65.2%.
    • 2019: 65.0%.
    • 2020: ??
    • 2021: 62.5%.
    • 2022: 64.0%.
    And this is before you even get into the demographics, the most recent of which show that at the time people are in their peak earning years (35-44), home ownership is at a record low. I was listening to the radio earlier and one of the speakers stated that attitudes in the UK were in stark contrast to those outside the UK (inferring that home ownership wasn't so important in other countries) and so I've just taken a quick look and of the G20 countries, the UK is ranked 15th (only Germany, Saudi Arabia, Japan and Turkey have lower home ownership rates). It's dismal.

    This is one area of public policy that no government has ever properly tackled or got right - there is a scheme being trialled in London at the moment where homes are being sold based on average salaries in the area (rather than other macroeconomic factors) and one of the big-ish banks (Skipton) is currently trying to get a new mortgage scheme approved where it can base someone's ability to repay on their historical rental repayments but the government should be doing more. For as long as the thinking is completed by private companies, the situation will not improve.

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  • Artoo
    replied
    The property market is broken, so I don’t think offering help is going to do much. That scheme where you bought part of your house and rented the rest from the government was nothing short of insulting.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wayne
    replied
    The Conservatives are considering a big policy announcement on home ownership, trying to sway younger voters...

    Sunak puts Help to Buy ‘back on the table’

    PM eyes first-time buyer boost as Labour pledges 300,000 properties a year

    Rishi Sunak is drawing up plans to boost support for first-time home buyers, as a key plank of the Conservatives’ campaign for a fifth term in office.

    Officials in Downing Street and the Treasury are looking at proposals to help thousands of renters who have been unable to get on the housing ladder in the face of high prices and rising interest rates.

    The move was discussed before the spring budget but was not taken forward amid fears that it would prove inflationary. Three government sources said a new-buyers’ support scheme was “back on the table” and could form part of Jeremy Hunt’s autumn statement.

    “We cannot go into the next election without an offer for first-time buyers,” one minister said. “We all know that homeowners are more likely to vote Conservative and we cannot cede this ground to Labour.”

    Labour pledged more support for first-time buyers yesterday and announced plans to revive targets to ensure that the private sector would build at least 300,000 homes a year.

    Sir Keir Starmer said he wanted to make Labour the party of home ownership and that the “dream” for too many people had been “killed by the prime minister”, who had given in to Tory MPs who forced the scrapping of mandatory local housebuilding targets.

    Rishi Sunak is drawing up plans to boost support for first-time home buyers, as a key plank of the Conservatives’ campaign for a fifth term in office.

    Officials in Downing Street and the Treasury are looking at proposals to help thousands of renters who have been unable to get on the housing ladder in the face of high prices and rising interest rates.

    The move was discussed before the spring budget but was not taken forward amid fears that it would prove inflationary. Three government sources said a new-buyers’ support scheme was “back on the table” and could form part of Jeremy Hunt’s autumn statement.

    “We cannot go into the next election without an offer for first-time buyers,” one minister said. “We all know that homeowners are more likely to vote Conservative and we cannot cede this ground to Labour.”

    Labour pledged more support for first-time buyers yesterday and announced plans to revive targets to ensure that the private sector would build at least 300,000 homes a year.

    Sir Keir Starmer said he wanted to make Labour the party of home ownership and that the “dream” for too many people had been “killed by the prime minister”, who had given in to Tory MPs who forced the scrapping of mandatory local housebuilding targets.

    The average age of a first-time buyer has risen from 31 when the Tories came to power in coalition in 2010 to 33 last year. First-time buyers make up 53 per cent of all sales in the UK but their numbers fell by 10 per cent last year. As of December, the average house price for a first-time buyer was 245,958, nearly 30 per cent more than five years ago.

    London is the most expensive region, with the average first-time buyer spending 469,496.

    One government source said that proposals were being examined by the Downing Street policy unit and were likely to form part of either the autumn statement or the budget next spring. “If we can’t do anything on housing supply we are going to have to do something on affordability,” the source said.

    The Conservatives have pledged to build 300,000 homes each year and insist that this target remains. But last December, in a concession to Tory MPs facing opposition to new developments in their constituencies, Michael Gove, the housing secretary, agreed to scale down local house-building targets. Last month it emerged that 55 local authorities had dropped their targets for new homes.

    The number of housing projects granted planning permission in the last three months of last year also fell to the lowest since at least 2006.

    Lisa Nandy, the shadow housing secretary, said: “Rishi Sunak abandoned a whole generation of young people aspiring to own their own home. It isn’t right that hardworking young people are being priced out of their areas, squeezed by rents, and having their ambition to buy a house taken from them.”

    Labour has promised first-time buyers a comprehensive mortgage guarantee scheme and first option on new homes in their area.

    David O’Leary, executive director of the Home Builders Federation, said there was an urgent need for government action to help first-time buyers.

    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/s...able-z5w5phrbp
    The Times article is behind a Paywall so I've copied it above but if you want to read it for yourself, just copy the Times link into this website and it removes the paywall: www.archive.ph

    Leave a comment:


  • Wayne
    replied
    Originally posted by bm08 View Post
    I want to vote for Labour but the party is doing bullocks and perhaps should also be sent a message. So Im torn.
    I agree with this too.

    I think the Tories are unlikely to suffer record losses due to the fact that they suffered record losses in 2019, and ultimately there are only so many seats a party is able to reasonably be expected to lose.

    I have even seen reporting that suggests that the Tories would view 300 seats lost as being a success with 1000 seats being lost being summarised as a bad night.

    I am still very torn over who to vote for though one thing is abundantly clear, if I want the Tories out, I have to tactically vote Labour.

    Leave a comment:


  • Artoo
    replied
    Originally posted by bm08 View Post
    I want to vote for Labour but the party is doing bullocks and perhaps should also be sent a message. So Im torn.
    Labour frustrate me no end, but for me I’d rather see them in power and be frustrated by them. For all their flaws, I think Labour genuinely want to improve the country, whereas the Tories seem intent on… well, I’m not sure what they’re trying to do - which just about sums up the last thirteen years actually.

    The Conservatives simply want the power to stop anyone else doing anything. But that doesn’t mean they have a plan, which is how we’re in this mess.

    I’m still bitter about the fact the only reason David Cameron ‘won’ his first election is because he was a better public speaker than Gordon Brown on those TV debates. Gordon had the substance but it was completely overlooked because Cameron had the confidence.

    Leave a comment:


  • bm08
    replied
    I want to vote for Labour but the party is doing bullocks and perhaps should also be sent a message. So Im torn.

    Leave a comment:


  • Artoo
    replied
    No elections here in London but I’m hoping the Tories suffer record losses. Time for the public to take revenge on all the utter nonsense.

    Leave a comment:


  • Thriller
    replied
    I really hope the Tories suffer massive losses. I don’t care who to, I just want them to be sent the message.

    I’ll be voting for Labour in Wakefield, a seat they comfortably hold currently.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wayne
    replied
    Hopefully most people in the U.K. are aware but this coming Thursday - 4 May - local elections across most of England (outside London) are due to take place. In total, there are 8,050 seats that will be contested.

    in the last election held in 2019, the Conservatives suffered massive losses - just three weeks after the May 2019, local elections, Theresa May resigned as the UK prime minister having suffered net losses in the elections of 1300 seeds. however, it was not a victory for Labour either as Labour also suffered a net loss in those elections, albeit one that was much smaller with less than 100 seats lost. in those elections, it was the Liberal Democrats who added over 700 seats and local smaller political groups who also added almost 700 seats that performed well.

    However, the context of the 2023 elections is much different; in these elections, the Labour Party hold a massive lead over the Conservative party in national polls with national polls indicating the Labour have a lead of at least 15%. These local elections are the first test for Rishi Sunak, and although he has narrowed the gap in popularity between the two main National parties in recent weeks, there is still a significant gap of 15%.

    Polls open in the UK on Thursday, the 4th of May at 7am and close at 10pm; and remember that, for the first time, this year, you will need voter ID to prove your identity and to be able to cast your vote.

    Leave a comment:


  • greek_boy
    replied




    Leave a comment:


  • greek_boy
    replied
    Brexit benefits: Furious Microsoft boss slams UK over takeover block ‘EU is better for business’

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/u...-b2327923.html

    Originally posted by Artoo View Post
    We can go around in circles on Brexit, but let’s not. The big mistake was allowing the public a referendum on the issue - we vote for MPs for a reason. I don’t believe Brexit would have happened if the MPs voted rather than the public.
    100% agreed.

    Leave a comment:


  • Artoo
    replied
    We can go around in circles on Brexit, but let’s not. The big mistake was allowing the public a referendum on the issue - we vote for MPs for a reason. I don’t believe Brexit would have happened if the MPs voted rather than the public.

    Leave a comment:


  • greek_boy
    replied
    Originally posted by Artoo View Post


    As much as I wanted to remain in the EU, it isn’t a perfect organisation. I’ve always been uncomfortable about a potential European Army (which continues to gain support) and I don’t like the funding model.
    The UK voting system isn't perfect, shall we move to a dictatorship?

    I'd say the best way to see if it was worth leaving the EU or not is by comparing the benefits the UK had as an EU member VS any benefits (!) as a third country (current relationship)

    Oh and yes, I absolutely agree with you! EU is not perfect. But leaving the world's largest trading bloc is not the answer and won't solve any problems (in fact, it created many issues and introduced red tapes). UK is definitely in a much worse position now than before.

    The UK had an advantageous and influential position within the EU. They had the power to influence decisions, legislations and propose changes. What the UK politicians said about the EU being the bad guy who was telling the UK what to do was a big lie to manipulate voters.

    And let's not forget the EU laws which protected human and employment rights and now the Tory Brexiteers want to ditch.

    It's all rumours about a potential European army (correct me if i am wrong) and nothing official yet. I don't know if it's the worst idea ever but I definitely know that any concerns would've been flagged by the UK government.


    Leave a comment:


  • Artoo
    replied
    Originally posted by greek_boy View Post

    Absolutely but what do we do to reverse the damage? Everyone knows it was a bad decision based on lies - how come no political party is brave enough to come forward and campaign in favour of reversing it or at least as a first step to negotiate a deal in the style of Norway/Switzerland? Is it because of the free movement that is a red flag to many?

    I feel like we're watching a Titanitic-type of disaster unfolding and no one is doing anything.
    I believe the Liberal Democrat’s did say if they won an election they would look to reverse Brexit, but they won’t win an election ever again.

    Personally I believe it isn’t reversible - as a nation it isn’t productive to keep voting in or out every few years, and that’s why Labour aren’t entertaining it. Brexit was a once in a generation vote and the results are binding. We just have to get on with it.

    As much as I wanted to remain in the EU, it isn’t a perfect organisation. I’ve always been uncomfortable about a potential European Army (which continues to gain support) and I don’t like the funding model.

    Leave a comment:


  • greek_boy
    replied
    Originally posted by Thriller View Post
    Of course they had no plan, I don't think they banked on over half of the country being so gullible and buying into their rhetoric, they just wanted to stir things up without ever actually having to do anything like Brexit. It'll go down as one of the biggest scandals and mistakes of this country's history.
    Absolutely but what do we do to reverse the damage? Everyone knows it was a bad decision based on lies - how come no political party is brave enough to come forward and campaign in favour of reversing it or at least as a first step to negotiate a deal in the style of Norway/Switzerland? Is it because of the free movement that is a red flag to many?

    I feel like we're watching a Titanitic-type of disaster unfolding and no one is doing anything.

    Leave a comment:


  • Artoo
    replied
    I mean it’s comments like that that prove the system is broken. More to the point, it simply isn’t true - energy costs are coming down and have no correlation to a person’s salary, but are the justifying factor in most of the increases we’ve seen.

    The whole system is an utter shambles. The UK economy is going to crash because people cannot afford to feed themselves, never mind buy themselves a home. The housing market frankly is a ticking time bomb.

    Leave a comment:


  • Thriller
    replied
    Small businesses and unions have hit back at the Bank of England's chief economist saying people need to accept they are poorer otherwise prices will keep rising.

    British households and businesses “need to accept” they are poorer and stop seeking pay increases and pushing prices higher, the Bank of England’s chief economist, Huw Pill, has said.

    Pill said a game of "pass the parcel" of workers asking for wage rises and businesses passing on higher costs was fuelling inflation.

    But the Federation of Small Businesses said his comments were "out of touch".

    Tina McKenzie, policy chair of the trade body, said small firms had been left with no choice to pass on the "huge increases they have seen for energy and input costs" to customers.

    "In many cases even that is not enough to fill the gap," she added.

    Ms McKenzie said many firms who are "only just hanging on day by day", were not able to invest and were cutting costs.

    Amanda Gearing, a senior organiser for the GMB union, said it was "absolutely outrageous to be honest, asking some of our lowest paid workers in this country, not to take a pay increase when inflation is so high".

    "People can't afford to live, they're not able to pay their rent or put food on the table," she told the BBC's Today programme.

    Paul Nowak, the TUC general secretary, added people didn't "need lectures" over pay and called for a plan to "make sure workers get their fair share".

    Mr Pill, who made 95,183, including benefits, in his first six months at the Bank, is paid more than 190,000 a year.
    Another out of touch arsehole.

    Leave a comment:


  • Thriller
    replied
    Of course they had no plan, I don't think they banked on over half of the country being so gullible and buying into their rhetoric, they just wanted to stir things up without ever actually having to do anything like Brexit. It'll go down as one of the biggest scandals and mistakes of this country's history.

    Leave a comment:


  • greek_boy
    replied

    Leave a comment:


  • SholasBoy
    replied
    I can imagine the scenes in theatres and cinemas (though you probably couldn’t hear it over all the chatting )

    Leave a comment:

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