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US Politics: Biden regains frontrunner status

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  • Originally posted by SpyVsSpy View Post
    Rich celebrities condemning Trump at glittery award shows where they praise each other while wearing outfits that cost the equivalent of average annual incomes actually do more to get the so-called conservative America to get behind him... it’s really not about logic and reason but about sentiment, which Trump has mastered
    It is actually sad that people vote against their own interests. Donald and the GOP have literally made it worse for the average American middle-class family... and yet they flock to him.

    When in 2040 whites will become the minority in the USA... I hope that we will never see another GOP president.
    My Chart

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    • Originally posted by stevyy View Post
      When in 2040 whites will become the minority in the USA... I hope that we will never see another GOP president.
      By 2040 the Supreme Court will be stacked, GOP will have the voter purge, add some literacy/history tests for the person to be able to vote.
      Waffles are checked cookies

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      • @stevyy: It's definitely a subjective matter of taste. There are quite a lot of people who prefer republican to democratic politics. Besides, maybe the white US population learns how to reproduce again and theregore stay the majority in the US.
        ~ representing the LBC ~

        Comment


        • Originally posted by theMathematician View Post
          @stevyy: It's definitely a subjective matter of taste.
          You think? To me, taste is something truly subjective, while voting behavior seems to be highly predictable.

          It depends on a variety of factors of course (like your address, gender, age, ethnicity, religion, religious service attendance, sexuality, birthplace, employment, occupation, income, social class, education, IQ, empathy, health, military service, marital status, social environment, intercultural experiences and so on), but I don't think 'taste' matters all that much.

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          • In a surprising Super Tuesday turn of events, Joe Biden is back to being the frontrunner
            Waffles are checked cookies

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            • Originally posted by heppolo View Post
              In a surprising Super Tuesday turn of events, Joe Biden is back to being the frontrunner
              'Surprising' is an understatement imo.

              After all that's happened (gaffe after gaffe, tragic debate performances, tragic fundraising, Ukraine involvement, 25% drop in the polls, massive underperformance in the early states), I'd say it's shocking and appalling. I mean a week ago it looked like he might have to drop out. If he is the nominee, I'm not very optimistic about November.

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              • Originally posted by Rihab View Post

                'Surprising' is an understatement imo.

                After all that's happened (gaffe after gaffe, tragic debate performances, tragic fundraising, Ukraine involvement, 25% drop in the polls, massive underperformance in the early states), I'd say it's shocking and appalling. I mean a week ago it looked like he might have to drop out. If he is the nominee, I'm not very optimistic about November.
                The establishment is now fully consolidated behind Biden.
                This was the moment that shifted the momentum for Biden, so many older black & minority voters subsequently come out for Biden.
                Waffles are checked cookies

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Rihab View Post

                  'Surprising' is an understatement imo.

                  After all that's happened (gaffe after gaffe, tragic debate performances, tragic fundraising, Ukraine involvement, 25% drop in the polls, massive underperformance in the early states), I'd say it's shocking and appalling. I mean a week ago it looked like he might have to drop out. If he is the nominee, I'm not very optimistic about November.
                  Bernie stands no chance of beating Trump. Neither does Biden but he has better odds.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Angeman View Post

                    Bernie stands no chance of beating Trump. Neither does Biden but he has better odds.
                    Honestly, I think Trump's chances are slightly overrated. Yes, he has almost a totalitarian control of the Republican base, but demographics are not playing in his favour. Republicans need voter suppression en masse.
                    Waffles are checked cookies

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Angeman View Post

                      Bernie stands no chance of beating Trump. Neither does Biden but he has better odds.
                      False. In the polls, Bernie beats Trump in most critical swing states. I don't know about Joe but I dont think he does.
                      I am the maniac, I am the ghoul
                      I'm in the shadows in the corners of my room

                      Comment


                      • Will Ivanka run for president in 2024?
                        2019 Year End Charts: The 20/20 Experience

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                        • Originally posted by DnBLover View Post

                          False. In the polls, Bernie beats Trump in most critical swing states. I don't know about Joe but I dont think he does.
                          Either way polls mean nothing. Hilary was leading in ALL polls and she lost. Bernie is too idealogical and most of America will not get behind that. Biden is a safe choice for dems.

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                          • Biden is probably the worst candidate. Unfortunately, Trump's gonna win again.
                            Haven't been early since '88

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                            • So the primary is effectively over after tonight, Biden has won.

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                              • I wonder how that whole virus thing will impact the campaign especially since both Trump and Biden are over 75+
                                Waffles are checked cookies

                                Comment


                                • https://amp.theatlantic.com/amp/arti...Tok_m_JoG-JuOg

                                  The Trump Presidency Is Over

                                  It has taken a good deal longer than it should have, but Americans have now seen the con man behind the curtain.

                                  by PETER WEHNER
                                  MARCH 13, 2020

                                  When, in January 2016, I wrote that despite being a lifelong Republican who worked in the previous three GOP administrations, I would never vote for Donald Trump, even though his administration would align much more with my policy views than a Hillary Clinton presidency would, a lot of my Republican friends were befuddled. How could I not vote for a person who checked far more of my policy boxes than his opponent?


                                  What I explained then, and what I have said many times since, is that Trump is fundamentally unfit—intellectually, morally, temperamentally, and psychologically—for office. For me, that is the paramount consideration in electing a president, in part because at some point it’s reasonable to expect that a president will face an unexpected crisis—and at that point, the president’s judgment and discernment, his character and leadership ability, will really matter.


                                  “Mr. Trump has no desire to acquaint himself with most issues, let alone master them” is how I put it four years ago. “No major presidential candidate has ever been quite as disdainful of knowledge, as indifferent to facts, as untroubled by his benightedness.” I added this:

                                  Mr. Trump’s virulent combination of ignorance, emotional instability, demagogy, solipsism and vindictiveness would do more than result in a failed presidency; it could very well lead to national catastrophe. The prospect of Donald Trump as commander in chief should send a chill down the spine of every American.

                                  It took until the second half of Trump’s first term, but the crisis has arrived in the form of the coronavirus pandemic, and it’s hard to name a president who has been as overwhelmed by a crisis as the coronavirus has overwhelmed Donald Trump.


                                  To be sure, the president isn’t responsible for either the coronavirus or the disease it causes, COVID-19, and he couldn’t have stopped it from hitting our shores even if he had done everything right. Nor is it the case that the president hasn’t done anything right; in fact, his decision to implement a travel ban on China was prudent. And any narrative that attempts to pin all of the blame on Trump for the coronavirus is simply unfair. The temptation among the president’s critics to use the pandemic to get back at Trump for every bad thing he’s done should be resisted, and schadenfreude is never a good look.

                                  That said, the president and his administration are responsible for grave, costly errors, most especially the epic manufacturing failures in diagnostic testing, the decision to test too few people, the delay in expanding testing to labs outside the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and problems in the supply chain. These mistakes have left us blind and badly behind the curve, and, for a few crucial weeks, they created a false sense of security. What we now know is that the coronavirus silently spread for several weeks, without us being aware of it and while we were doing nothing to stop it. Containment and mitigation efforts could have significantly slowed its spread at an early, critical point, but we frittered away that opportunity.


                                  “They’ve simply lost time they can’t make up. You can’t get back six weeks of blindness,” Jeremy Konyndyk, who helped oversee the international response to Ebola during the Obama administration and is a senior policy fellow at the Center for Global Development, told The Washington Post. “To the extent that there’s someone to blame here, the blame is on poor, chaotic management from the White House and failure to acknowledge the big picture.”


                                  Earlier this week, Anthony Fauci, the widely respected director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases whose reputation for honesty and integrity have been only enhanced during this crisis, admitted in congressional testimony that the United States is still not providing adequate testing for the coronavirus. “It is failing. Let’s admit it.” He added, “The idea of anybody getting [testing] easily, the way people in other countries are doing it, we’re not set up for that. I think it should be, but we’re not."


                                  We also know the World Health Organization had working tests that the United States refused, and researchers at a project in Seattle tried to conduct early tests for the coronavirus but were prevented from doing so by federal officials. (Doctors at the research project eventually decided to perform coronavirus tests without federal approval.)

                                  But that’s not all. The president reportedly ignored early warnings of the severity of the virus and grew angry at a CDC official who in February warned that an outbreak was inevitable. The Trump administration dismantled the National Security Council’s global-health office, whose purpose was to address global pandemics; we’re now paying the price for that. “We worked very well with that office,” Fauci told Congress. “It would be nice if the office was still there.” We may face a shortage of ventilators and medical supplies, and hospitals may soon be overwhelmed, certainly if the number of coronavirus cases increases at a rate anything like that in countries such as Italy. (This would cause not only needless coronavirus-related deaths, but deaths from those suffering from other ailments who won’t have ready access to hospital care.)

                                  Some of these mistakes are less serious and more understandable than others. One has to take into account that in government, when people are forced to make important decisions based on incomplete information in a compressed period of time, things go wrong.

                                  Yet in some respects, the avalanche of false information from the president has been most alarming of all. It’s been one rock slide after another, the likes of which we have never seen. Day after day after day he brazenly denied reality, in an effort to blunt the economic and political harm he faced. But Trump is in the process of discovering that he can’t spin or tweet his way out of a pandemic. There is no one who can do to the coronavirus what Attorney General William Barr did to the Mueller report: lie about it and get away with it.

                                  The president’s misinformation and mendacity about the coronavirus are head-snapping. He claimed that it was contained in America when it was actually spreading. He claimed that we had “shut it down” when we had not. He claimed that testing was available when it wasn’t. He claimed that the coronavirus will one day disappear “like a miracle”; it won’t. He claimed that a vaccine would be available in months; Fauci says it will not be available for a year or more.


                                  Trump falsely blamed the Obama administration for impeding coronavirus testing. He stated that the coronavirus first hit the United States later than it actually did. (He said that it was three weeks prior to the point at which he spoke; the actual figure was twice that.) The president claimed that the number of cases in Italy was getting “much better” when it was getting much worse. And in one of the more stunning statements an American president has ever made, Trump admitted that his preference was to keep a cruise ship off the California coast rather than allowing it to dock, because he wanted to keep the number of reported cases of the coronavirus artificially low.

                                  “I like the numbers,” Trump said. “I would rather have the numbers stay where they are. But if they want to take them off, they’ll take them off. But if that happens, all of a sudden your 240 [cases] is obviously going to be a much higher number, and probably the 11 [deaths] will be a higher number too.” (Cooler heads prevailed, and over the president’s objections, the Grand Princess was allowed to dock at the Port of Oakland.)


                                  On and on it goes.

                                  To make matters worse, the president delivered an Oval Office address that was meant to reassure the nation and the markets but instead shook both. The president’s delivery was awkward and stilted; worse, at several points, the president, who decided to ad-lib the teleprompter speech, misstated his administration’s own policies, which the administration had to correct. Stock futures plunged even as the president was still delivering his speech. In his address, the president called for Americans to “unify together as one nation and one family,” despite having referred to Washington Governor Jay Inslee as a “snake” days before the speech and attacking Democrats the morning after it. As The Washington Post’s Dan Balz put it, “Almost everything that could have gone wrong with the speech did go wrong.”

                                  Taken together, this is a massive failure in leadership that stems from a massive defect in character. Trump is such a habitual liar that he is incapable of being honest, even when being honest would serve his interests. He is so impulsive, shortsighted, and undisciplined that he is unable to plan or even think beyond the moment. He is such a divisive and polarizing figure that he long ago lost the ability to unite the nation under any circumstances and for any cause. And he is so narcissistic and unreflective that he is completely incapable of learning from his mistakes. The president’s disordered personality makes him as ill-equipped to deal with a crisis as any president has ever been. With few exceptions, what Trump has said is not just useless; it is downright injurious.


                                  The nation is recognizing this, treating him as a bystander “as school superintendents, sports commissioners, college presidents, governors and business owners across the country take it upon themselves to shut down much of American life without clear guidance from the president,” in the words of Peter Baker and Maggie Haberman of The New York Times.

                                  Donald Trump is shrinking before our eyes.

                                  The coronavirus is quite likely to be the Trump presidency’s inflection point, when everything changed, when the bluster and ignorance and shallowness of America’s 45th president became undeniable, an empirical reality, as indisputable as the laws of science or a mathematical equation.

                                  It has taken a good deal longer than it should have, but Americans have now seen the con man behind the curtain. The president, enraged for having been unmasked, will become more desperate, more embittered, more unhinged. He knows nothing will be the same. His administration may stagger on, but it will be only a hollow shell. The Trump presidency is over.

                                  PETER WEHNER is a contributing writer at The Atlantic, a senior fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center, and Egan visiting professor at Duke University. He writes widely on political, cultural, religious, and national-security issues, and he is the author of The Death of Politics: How to Heal Our Frayed Republic After Trump.

                                  Comment


                                  • Yet he will be reelected.
                                    5.05.2009 / 6.22.2011 / 4.24.2013 / 4.25.2013 / 3.1.2014 / 9.13.2014 / 7.21.2016 / 7.14.2018 / 7.15.2018

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                                    • Originally posted by KEY9481 View Post
                                      Yet he will be reelected.
                                      This. If recent times have taught us anything then it is to never underestimate human stupidity and ignorance.

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                                      • Originally posted by aRat View Post

                                        This. If recent times have taught us anything then it is to never underestimate human stupidity and ignorance.
                                        Dems are trying to hand it to Trump on a plate and only Trump's incompetence and stupidity saves Democrats from obliteration. Had Pence been in charge and with the same cult-like status, Dems would be staring Reagan-like election result in the face.
                                        Waffles are checked cookies

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