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  • Originally posted by Rihab
    BREAKING NEWS:

    FAT SIGGY WON'T RUN!!!

    There's hope!!!
    Martin Martin Martin machet, jung!
    My Chart

    Comment


    • Just when all eyes are on Washington,
      up springs a challenger to Merkel in Berlin




      A couple of years ago the German political scene seemed pretty stable. The chancellor, Angela Merkel, was riding high in the polls, her social democratic coalition partner, the SPD, was weak, and although a right-wing party, the AfD, had had some election successes, Merkelís position seemed unassailable.

      2015 saw the refugee crisis, with more than 1 million new arrivals registered, and Merkel has since faced Ė and largely seen off Ė internal challenges, her position reinforced by the absence of obvious rivals. Commentators and pollsters have been confidently anticipating that the German general election in September will see Merkel re-elected, and most probably renew her coalition with the SPD (though with both sides losing some ground to other parties, principally the AfD).

      That projected stability held until yesterday, 24 January 2017, which may have been a rather momentous day for the future of Europe Ė and not only because the UKís supreme court issued its ruling on parliamentary scrutiny of Brexit.

      While the world was fixated on that event, and on Donald Trumpís first week in office, the SPD stunned the German political scene by announcing that Martin Schulz, who was until last week the president of the European parliament, would be its candidate against Merkel in the 2017 elections, and would also take over as SPD leader. The incumbent leader, Sigmar Gabriel, will resign from that post, and take over as German foreign minister (a role for which Schulz had been hotly tipped).

      Gabrielís decision to fall on his sword brings important consequences for the SPD, Germany, and Europe. An SPD defeat at the 2017 election, while still likely, no longer seems the certainty it did last month (when the SPD trailed Merkelís CDU/CSU by 15% in the polls). Schulzís personal approval ratings are significantly better than Gabrielís, and indeed in January overtook Merkelís (up 35% for Schulz, +14% for Merkel, -7% for Gabriel).

      Schulz is a fascinating, enigmatic character. His early years were tough: in small-town western Germany, his performance at school stopped him taking A-levels, he trained as a bookseller rather than going to university, and he experienced alcoholism in his 20s, abstaining from drink ever since. Three decades later, he has become one of the most influential politicians on the European stage, even gaining kudos in 2003 when he heckled Silvio Berlusconi at the European parliament Ė Berlusconi then compared him to a concentration camp commander, prompting a brief diplomatic crisis in the EU.

      Schulz has forged a close alliance with Christian Democrats in Europe, become the undisputed figurehead of the Social Democratic party family, and developed a reputation as a formidable political operator (helped by his fluent command of five European languages).

      The mood of the German general election campaign now seems likely to change. Under Gabriel, the SPD would have been closely associated with two terms in government as Merkelís junior coalition partner, from 2005 to 2009, and then from 2013 onwards. During this time, the SPD has been able to achieve some of its longstanding policy goals (notably the introduction of a national minimum wage), but has found Merkel in firm occupation of the centre ground of German politics, leaving its own ministers trailing. At a stroke, with Schulzís candidacy, the SPD appears a more exciting prospect, no longer so closely associated with workmanlike support for Merkelís government and no longer bound by cabinet responsibility and discipline. German votersí party preferences tend to shift only slowly, and the SPD still has a mountain to climb. But now the campaign will be far more vigorous, and the SPDís challenge more plausible. The party has struggled to lay a glove on Merkel, but that may just change.

      SOURCE
      #ImWithHim

      Comment


      • One is uncharismatic, one is there way too long. AfD is going to do very good, better than a lot of people expect.
        Waffles are checked cookies

        Comment


        • I really can't get the fuss about Martin Schulz, tbh.

          It was a smart decision to not let Gabriel run for Chancellor but Schulz hasn't been active in local policies for years now and we basically have people thinking that the EU has been the reason for many crisis at the moment. Many people blame Europe and instead of Merkel's policies, the EU has never been that "openly discussed" in the media or in daily life. He has been a very "faceless" and like heppolo said, "uncharismatic" politician in the first place.

          So we have basically Merkel whose got the reputation of "ruling the EU" and Schulz who stands for European bureaucracy and policies running for presidents. I don't think that any of them will attract people who think that the European system needs a make-over.

          I really appreciate it that he speaks so many European languages fluently. He is also a fighter! That's what I like about him. His shattered dreams of becoming a footballer, his alcoholism and depressions didn't bring him down and he made his way up to the top of the political landscape. Unlike Merkel, he's also someone voicing his own opinion very loud and clear and he's not afraid of who's going to feel offended. I really hope that he will continue being so honest and clear about his agendas and views this year so that he can end up being a real threat to Merkel but at the moment, I can't jump on the bandwagon like my fellow Germans.
          There's still a very loooooooooong way to go for the SPD to come up with own ideas, values and to present Schulz as a capable potential chancellor.
          Mainshow Goes Diva: Kylie Minogue

          Comment


          • Promoting EU values may get you nowhere these days in terms of elections.
            Waffles are checked cookies

            Comment


            • How many people let cats outside anyway? If there is such law coming here, I'd surely protest. I never steped into a cat poop.


              Btw jio, vays are more popular in both Austria and Germany. 1,3 and 13 mili respectively. Dogs are second.
              be kind to every kind (also the unkind kind!!!!! )

              Comment


              • so glad that they did not choose Gabriel, so maybe there's some hope to prevent Merkel's win
                I am not trying to seduce you... Would you like me to seduce you? Is that what you're trying to tell me?

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Erotica
                  so glad that they did not choose Gabriel, so maybe there's some hope to prevent Merkel's win
                  nobody can topple her this time around...the SPD's only task / goal in this election is to stay the 2nd strongest party which is a possibility NOW.
                  My Chart

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by stevyy
                    Originally posted by Erotica
                    so glad that they did not choose Gabriel, so maybe there's some hope to prevent Merkel's win
                    nobody can topple her this time around...the SPD's only task / goal in this election is to stay the 2nd strongest party which is a possibility NOW.
                    I know, sadly
                    I am not trying to seduce you... Would you like me to seduce you? Is that what you're trying to tell me?

                    Comment


                    • INSA / YouGov:

                      CDU/CSU: 32.5% (=)
                      SPD: 26% (+5)
                      Left: 10.5% (-0.5)
                      Greens: 7.5% (-1)
                      Liberals: 6.5% (-1)
                      AFD: 13% (-1.5)

                      Coming for wigs.

                      Comment




                      • Where is everyone? It's happening!

                        Comment


                        • 34% is still too much for this bunch of amateurs.
                          Waffles are checked cookies

                          Comment


                          • How is this going?

                            It seems like she won't win
                            Please Stop the Music

                            Comment


                            • if Erdogan continues threatening and badmouthing her, she will probably win...
                              jio CHARTS NOW: 18/1/2022: https://www.ukmix.org/forum/chart-di...0#post10809490

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Crackiswack
                                How is this going?


                                It's close.

                                Comment


                                • So what does it mean if SPD becomes 1st? Just that at that moment they are most likely to win? And that Merkel has a decent chance of losing?
                                  Please Stop the Music

                                  Comment


                                  • Which party's the fascist one?

                                    Comment


                                    • I think AfD
                                      Please Stop the Music

                                      Comment


                                      • ^ Yes, it's AfD.

                                        Originally posted by Crackiswack
                                        So what does it mean if SPD becomes 1st? Just that at that moment they are most likely to win? And that Merkel has a decent chance of losing?
                                        If Merkel's CDU falls behind SPD, her opponent (Schulz) would become chancellor instead of her in another grand coalition (SPD + CDU). Schulz would also become chancellor if an SPD + Left/Linke + Greens/GrŁne coalition wins more than 50% of all seats though. According to that poll above, they'd win 47% of the votes (31% + 8% + 8%) and 49% of all seats (47 / 96) at the moment.

                                        Comment


                                        • But SPD doesn't look bad
                                          Please Stop the Music

                                          Comment


                                          • Originally posted by Crackiswack
                                            But SPD doesn't look bad
                                            Yeah, it looks quite good for them. The race is A LOT closer than in the last 3 elections.

                                            Comment


                                            • What is the May election for??

                                              Sorry for all the questions. And is there a French Presidential election topic, I fear Marine might win there
                                              Please Stop the Music

                                              Comment


                                              • Originally posted by Crackiswack
                                                What is the May election for??
                                                There'll be two state elections in May ('Schleswig-Holstein' + 'North Rhine-Westphalia') and one next Sunday actually ('Saarland'). They decide which party takes control of the upper house of parliament (called 'Bundesrat', which is somewhat similar to the US Senate) and can be seen as a test run for the main election in September.

                                                You could either post in this thread or open a new one.

                                                Comment


                                                • Originally posted by Rihab
                                                  Originally posted by Crackiswack
                                                  What is the May election for??
                                                  There'll be two state elections in May ('Schleswig-Holstein' + 'North Rhine-Westphalia') and one next Sunday actually ('Saarland'). They decide which party takes control of the upper house of parliament (called 'Bundesrat', which is somewhat similar to the US Senate) and can be seen as a test run for the main election in September.

                                                  You could either post in this thread or open a new one.
                                                  Oh ok that makes sense, thank you!
                                                  Please Stop the Music

                                                  Comment


                                                  • Merkel's party is back to winning in the polls and state elections. Get ready for 4 more years of stupid.

                                                    Comment

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