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UK knife crime epidemic: 2 dead, 7 injured in one weekend in London

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  • UK knife crime epidemic: 2 dead, 7 injured in one weekend in London



    London murder rate overtakes New York for first time ever after spate of fatal stabbings and shootings

    London's murder rate has overtaken New York City's for the first time ever, according to a new report.

    February marked the first month the UK capital saw more murders than New York, with 15 dead (nine aged 30 or younger).

    According to the report in the Sunday Times, London also suffered 22 fatal stabbings and shootings in March, higher than the 21 in the Big Apple.

    Both cities have similarly sized populations of around 8.5m people. New York City's murder rate has decreased by around 87 per cent since the 1990s.

    Meanwhile, London's has grown by nearly 40 per cent in just three years, not including deaths caused by terrorist attacks.

    On Saturday a murder probe was launched after a 36-year-old woman was killed in what is believed to be the 30th incident of fatal knife crime in the capital this year.

    The death came just hours after a man 23-year-old man died after being stabbed in the neck in Plumstead, south-east London on Thursday evening.

    Jacob Whittingham, charity head of programmes for Fight for Peace, told the paper: "What's scary about London is the randomness of the crime.

    "With young people in London, you have no idea if and when you may be the victim of a violent crime — that's why they feel the need to carry weapons."

    Britain's most senior police officer recently said social media was partially to blame for the soaring rate of knife crime in the UK.

    Met Commissioner Cressida Dick said websites and mobile phone applications such as YouTube, Snapchat and Instagram were partially to blame for the bloodshed.

    Fatal stabbings in England and Wales are now at their highest levels since 2011, rising by 12 per cent in the year ending December 2017.

    https://www.standard.co.uk/news/crime/l ... 03566.html
    Absolutely shocking to see a UK city compared to a US city in this regard.

  • #2
    Re: London murder rate overtakes New York for first time eve

    How can it be blamed on social media?

    Comment


    • #3
      Britain's most senior police officer Cressida Dick blames social media for fuelling knife crime among teenagers

      People are 'able to go from slightly angry with each other to 'fight' very quickly,' Metropolitan Police Chief says


      Britain’s most senior police officer has blamed social media for the soaring rate of knife crime in the UK, particularly among children.

      After 13 Londoners were killed in two weeks this month, Metropolitan Police Commissioner Cressida Dick said websites and mobile phone applications such as YouTube, Snapchat and Instagram were in part to blame for the bloodshed.

      Trivial disputes could escalate into violence “within minutes” when rivals set out to goad each other on the internet, Ms Dick said.

      “There’s definitely something about the impact of social media in terms of people being able to go from slightly angry with each other to ‘fight’ very quickly,” she told The Times.

      She said that insults or threats online “makes [violence] faster, it makes it harder for people to cool down. I’m sure it does rev people up.”

      She also compared the speed at which youths with no previous or very limited criminal record can become killers to the way some Islamic extremists become radicalised in a matter of days.

      Last August, 15-year-old Jermaine Goupall was knifed to death in Thornton Heath, south London, in the climax of a feud between rival gangs posting mocking videos on YouTube.

      So far this year, 29 people have been knifed to death just in London and fatal stabbings in England and Wales are at their highest levels since 2010-2011.

      It started with the murder of four young men during New Year’s Eve celebrations and has continued at a rate of one fatal stabbing every three days.

      Teenagers as young as 17 are among the victims, while many more have been severely injured in a spate of violence that has sparked large-scale police operations and urgent policy changes.

      If the bloodshed continues at the same rate, more than 121 people will be stabbed to death in the capital by the end of the year, a dramatic 50 per cent increase on 2017.

      A 23-year-old man lost his life on Thursday night after being stabbed in the neck near Plumstead railway station in south-east London.

      https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/c ... 82416.html

      Comment


      • #4
        Social media does inflame things because it puts people in constant, immediate contact with each other so feuds can escalate very quickly.

        I covered at a high school last year and had to get a teenager removed from the class because he went mental when his found out his mate had "slid into his girlfriend's DMs".

        How have NY managed to reduce their murder rate so massively? We need tips!

        Comment


        • #5


          New York crime rates decline to lowest in decades: report

          Crime rates in New York City this year sunk to their lowest level since the 1950s, according to police data.


          Crimes in all major felony categories, including murder, burglary, rape and car thefts have all declined, The New York Times reported. The number of crimes in those categories totaled 94,806 as of Sunday.

          There have been a total of 286 killings in the city this year.

          This would mark the 27th year in a row that the city’s crime rates have declined. Last year’s record-low was 101,716 incidents. The New York Times reported Thursday that the increase in safety can partially be attributed to police using less deadly force and cutting down on stop-and-frisk practices.

          Police intentionally fired their weapons only 23 times this year, down from 37 last year, and are using stun guns more often, according to the newspaper.

          Officials reported that despite lower rates of reported rapes overall, there was an increase in reports toward the end of the year, saying the #MeToo movement may have emboldened more victims to come forward. Misdemeanor sex crimes, like groping, also increased overall.

          The New York data fall in line with national trends. Crime rates in cities across the nation have been steadily declining, despite President Trump’s warnings about violent crime and rising murder rates.

          Trump said in his Inauguration Day address that he would work to end the “American carnage” of violent crimes, and has slammed other political leaders and candidates for not being "tough on crime."

          New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and Police Commissioner James O’Neill say the declining crime rates are a result of increased trust between communities and law enforcement, and a more targeted police strategy that focuses on gangs and repeat offenders.

          http://thehill.com/blogs/blog-briefing- ... des-report

          Comment


          • #6
            It's getting very bad - since I posted this, there's been a further 11 further deaths (that's 1 per day on average)...

            Man stabbed to death in Hackney in London's latest killing

            Number of killings in capital this year passes 50 after death of victim believed to be in his 20s


            A man has died after being stabbed in north-east London, bringing the number of killings in the capital this year to more than 50.

            The victim, thought to be in his 20s, was found fatally wounded by officers on patrol in Hackney shortly before 8pm on Wednesday.

            Despite receiving first aid, he died at the scene about half an hour later. There have been no arrests and a crime scene remains in place.

            In the same borough hours earlier, a man in his 50s died outside a bookmakers in Clapton following a suspected fight, the Metropolitan police said.

            Fatal stabbings in England and Wales are at their highest level since 2010-11, with the escalating violence especially acute in London, where 13 people were killed in two weeks last month.

            On Tuesday, Amaan Shakoor, 16, became the youngest murder victim in London so far this year after he was fatally shot the previous day in Walthamstow.

            His death came after that of Tanesha Melbourne, 17, who was gunned down about 30 minutes earlier, three miles away in Tottenham. Both were apparently casualties of gang violence.

            The Met commissioner, Cressida Dick, has blamed social media for the rise in killings, particularly among teenagers, saying trivial disputes could escalate into violence “within minutes” when rivals set out to goad each other online.

            Scotland Yard said it is investigating 55 suspected murders since the start of 2018, including the deaths of two children whose bodies were found in Sussex.

            In a statement on the latest killing, the Met said: “Shortly before 20.00 on Wednesday 4 April, officers on patrol on Link Street in Hackney were approached by a man suffering from stab injuries. Officers immediately provided the man with first aid.

            “The London ambulance service and London’s air ambulance attended. The man, who is believed to be aged in his early 20s, was pronounced dead at the scene at 20.24.”

            The Met said the stabbing victim’s family were yet to be informed. “A postmortem examination will be held in due course. The homicide and major crime command has been notified,” the force said.

            https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/201 ... police-say
            55 lives lost so far in one city.

            Comment


            • #7
              Actually when I visited London I found the city to feel unsafe. I was just uneasy being there. The whole mood of the city put me off tremendously, I can't pinpoint what exactly.

              At the time I thought maybe it was due to the terrorist attacks, but on the same year I went to Berlin twice which also suffered from it and I absolutely loved that city and felt great in it.

              But you need to sort this out. This is insane. Imagine if guns were readily available like in America.
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              • #8
                Originally posted by DnBLover
                Actually when I visited London I found the city to feel unsafe. I was just uneasy being there. The whole mood of the city put me off tremendously, I can't pinpoint what exactly.

                At the time I thought maybe it was due to the terrorist attacks, but on the same year I went to Berlin twice which also suffered from it and I absolutely loved that city and felt great in it.

                But you need to sort this out. This is insane. Imagine if guns were readily available like in America.
                How you felt says everything about you and nothing about London.

                London is one of the most open, passionate, vibrant, multicultural places in the world. There is no where like it. Terrorist attacks did not dampen our spirits - there was an increased level of love and defiance in London after them. We stood and continue to stand together.

                The murder rate is horrid at the moment, I can’t lie. But when you cut back on essential services, take police out of the community and stop them interacting and understanding the people and the area, nothing good is going to come of it.
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                • #9
                  The reduction in police officers is definitely a primary reason for the increase in crime in London.

                  The Metropolitan Police Force has seen it's police officer headcount go from 32,904 in 2010 to 30,083 in 2017 (a decline of 2,821 or 8.5%). In that same time frame, the PCSO (Police Community Support Officer) headcount has gone from 4,645 to 1,384 (a decline of 3,261 or 70.2%).

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Wayne
                    The reduction in police officers is definitely a primary reason for the increase in crime in London.
                    It's not a primary reason. There is no proven correlation between policing and crime rates in research: "A recent review of the literature commissioned by HMIC concluded that there was not enough evidence to say that higher numbers of police officers was the direct cause of lower levels of crime (Bradford 2011)."

                    Crime has psychological, social, political and cultural roots. It has been proven over and over again that a fear of high punishment or more police doesn't reduce crime at all. A higher perception of getting caught does deter crime, but it's wrong to say that more police can actually increase that perception. Hence, a crime is not always a rational, and when it is rational the risk analysis doesn't only include factors related to police.

                    And have all crimes raised in London, or is it only homicide? Big difference.

                    What happened under Bloomberg in New York is not a one-sided fairytale story. They are even not 100 percent sure it's due to their crime/policing tactics that homicide numbers dropped so low, although there is clearly some type of relation, but not one-sided causal. Even aside from the perverse effects of stop-and-frisk strategoes, other ethnic/racial profiling measures, criminalising anti-social behaviour,... it is all very unclear. For example they claim the broken windows theory had an effect on their lowering rates of homicide crimes, while this theory has been debunked for decades now. Of course something needs to happen, and despite for example racial profiling the black community profitted the most of the lower homicide rates. Still every measure has its perverse effects, it's not an exact science: there is never one good answer. In New york non profit organizations also played a big role, so did prevention, etc. And overall homicides are not as high anymore (in most Western societies) because the nature of crime has changed (not disappeared) (e.g., from public spaces to private spaces, from offline to online, organisational changes of maffia/organized crime in more bureaucratic societies, etc.).

                    The whole security paradigm related to crime is overemphasized in media, and reports should be read with caution. There never was and never will be a clear relationship between security and crime.
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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Michiel
                      It might be a reason but not a primary reason. There is no proven correlation between both of them in research: "A recent review of the literature commissioned by HMIC concluded that there was not enough evidence to say that higher numbers of police officers was the direct cause of lower levels of crime (Bradford 2011)."
                      Perhaps I wasn't as specific as I should've been in my post - I was referring to violent crime (which is what this topic focuses on).

                      I don't agree with your point regardless - it is absolutely a primary reason in my view. You can't quote a study from 2011 as evidence to the contrary, when so much has changed in the UK in that time frame - don't get me wrong, it would be simplistic of me to argue that police officer numbers are THE primary (or driving) reason behind an increase in crime (there are other considerations - economic factors, sociological indicators, educational issues and as you referenced both political and cultural). The whole issue of crime is far too complex to pin-point to one factor or influence - but it is still a significant point of consideration.

                      Originally posted by Michiel
                      And have all crimes raised, or is it only homicide?
                      Since 2010, violent crime has increased at an alarming rate. Overall, the crime rate (which measures the number of crimes as a %) has jumped from 2.18 to 2.20 (so a minor increase and driven entirely by violent crime).

                      Between April 2010-March 2011, 823,534 crimes were committed in London.

                      Theft & Handling - 337,567
                      Violence Against the Person - 165,923
                      Burglary - 93,411
                      Criminal Damage - 80,331
                      Drugs - 64,076
                      Robbery - 35,857
                      Fraud & Forgery - 23,597
                      Other Notifiable - 12,537
                      Sexual Offences - 10,235

                      Between March 2017-February 2018, 831,032 crimes were committed in London.

                      Theft & Handling - 332,684
                      Violence Against the Person - 250,630
                      Burglary - 77,616
                      Criminal Damage - 63,190
                      Drugs - 36,306
                      Robbery - 32,817
                      Other Notifiable - 16,537
                      Sexual Offences - 19,895
                      Fraud & Forgery - 1,357

                      There's been declines across the board in all areas except for Violent Crime (which has increased significantly by 84,707 crimes or 51.0%) and Other Notifiable. To put it another way, if you remove the impact of violent crime, the number of crimes went from 657,611 in April 2010-March 2011 to 580,402 in March 2017-February 2018 (in other words, a decline of 77,209 - or 11.7% in crime).

                      https://www.met.police.uk/stats-and-dat ... dashboard/

                      Originally posted by Michiel
                      The whole security paradigm related to crime is overemphasized in media, and reports should be read with caution. There never was and never will be clear relationship between security and crime.
                      The role of a police officer is so different these days to what it once was - every police station in the UK used to have a neighbourhood policing team, beat officers that were on the ground and that knew their local communities. That service was gradually phased out and replaced by PCSOs but in the time frame since police were numbers have started to be cut, the number of PCSOs has declined at a worrying rate (with those numbers cut to protect the number of police officers). There no longer remains a strong link between local communities and the police in London (though I would argue that the police still do a good job).

                      The Guardian wrote a really balanced article on this issue here just yesterday: https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/201 ... gures-show

                      The UK government has commissioned a study and it finds in that study that the decline in police officers is a significant factor in the rise of violent crime, though it is one of many reasons.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I live in Rio de Janeiro and these numbers only serve to terrify me even more .
                        Although I couldn't find any official number for murders in 2018 ,in 2017 there were 6731 deaths caused by violence in the city.
                        That's an average of around 560 deaths per month !!!!
                        Again: 560 deaths in average per month .
                        Mind you that authorities were 'celebrating' the fact that simce 2009 up until 2016,the average of muders per 100 k citizens were lower than 40.
                        Jeez,what a jungle (no pun intended) we live in.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Wayne
                          Originally posted by Michiel
                          It might be a reason but not a primary reason. There is no proven correlation between both of them in research: "A recent review of the literature commissioned by HMIC concluded that there was not enough evidence to say that higher numbers of police officers was the direct cause of lower levels of crime (Bradford 2011)."
                          Perhaps I wasn't as specific as I should've been in my post - I was referring to violent crime (which is what this topic focuses on).

                          I don't agree with your point regardless - it is absolutely a primary reason in my view. You can't quote a study from 2011 as evidence to the contrary, when so much has changed in the UK in that time frame - don't get me wrong, it would be simplistic of me to argue that police officer numbers are THE primary (or driving) reason behind an increase in crime (there are other considerations - economic factors, sociological indicators, educational issues and as you referenced both political and cultural). The whole issue of crime is far too complex to pin-point to one factor or influence - but it is still a significant point of consideration.
                          The study is from 2011, but it's literature review. I can give you a 2018 study which will basically conclude the same thing. It's of course a factor, but the role it plays depends on a lot of other factors. I'm gonna be simplistic but there are societies with relatively high amount of police forces, yet they have way higher crime rates and vice versa. Even in Western modern societies this still rings true. So well there might be a relation sometimes in some contexts and in some ways for some crimes, it's too easy to only report about this as a primary reason. The main issue for me here is how you frame these kind of findings and relationships. Miscommunication can easily happen, especially when it comes to very sensitive matters as these.

                          I already got a feel during some of our previous discussions we have different political ideas, which is why we probably differ here in opinion. Which is fine by me, but I'm very sensitive to framing crime. There is no denying that security and policing is overemphasized which really gives a wrong idea of its true importance in the social phenomenon.

                          Originally posted by Wayne
                          Originally posted by Michiel
                          And have all crimes raised, or is it only homicide?
                          Since 2010, violent crime has increased at an alarming rate. Overall, the crime rate (which measures the number of crimes as a %) has jumped from 2.18 to 2.20 (so a minor increase and driven entirely by violent crime).

                          Between April 2010-March 2011, 823,534 crimes were committed in London.

                          Theft & Handling - 337,567
                          Violence Against the Person - 165,923
                          Burglary - 93,411
                          Criminal Damage - 80,331
                          Drugs - 64,076
                          Robbery - 35,857
                          Fraud & Forgery - 23,597
                          Other Notifiable - 12,537
                          Sexual Offences - 10,235

                          Between March 2017-February 2018, 831,032 crimes were committed in London.

                          Theft & Handling - 332,684
                          Violence Against the Person - 250,630
                          Burglary - 77,616
                          Criminal Damage - 63,190
                          Drugs - 36,306
                          Robbery - 32,817
                          Other Notifiable - 16,537
                          Sexual Offences - 19,895
                          Fraud & Forgery - 1,357

                          There's been declines across the board in all areas except for Violent Crime (which has increased significantly by 84,707 crimes or 51.0%) and Other Notifiable. To put it another way, if you remove the impact of violent crime, the number of crimes went from 657,611 in April 2010-March 2011 to 580,402 in March 2017-February 2018 (in other words, a decline of 77,209 - or 11.7% in crime).

                          https://www.met.police.uk/stats-and-dat ... dashboard/
                          Thanks for the clarification. But you were talking about crimes earlier, which might give the idea that all crime rates actually got up when they actually went down. Once again, framing.

                          Originally posted by Wayne
                          Originally posted by Michiel
                          The whole security paradigm related to crime is overemphasized in media, and reports should be read with caution. There never was and never will be clear relationship between security and crime.
                          The role of a police officer is so different these days to what it once was - every police station in the UK used to have a neighbourhood policing team, beat officers that were on the ground and that knew their local communities. That service was gradually phased out and replaced by PCSOs but in the time frame since police were numbers have started to be cut, the number of PCSOs has declined at a worrying rate (with those numbers cut to protect the number of police officers). There no longer remains a strong link between local communities and the police in London (though I would argue that the police still do a good job).

                          The Guardian wrote a really balanced article on this issue here just yesterday: https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/201 ... gures-show

                          The UK government has commissioned a study and it finds in that study that the decline in police officers is a significant factor in the rise of violent crime, though it is one of many reasons.
                          Fair point made here, as I don't know the situation on the ground as far as police forces goes in the United Kingdom. If what you are saying is the case, then I think I might agree, as the link between police forces and the local community is very important. Although also here there needs to be clarification about what this link ought to be. Where is the emphasis: is it a community police role? Is it repressive? Is it preventive? Is it social? Is it rehabilitation? Is it restorative? In combination with other serivces? Etc.

                          So I agree that the changing roles of police men/women is an important factor to explain crime, but the number of police forces an sich is not. That's what I meant with my last sentence, as I 'attacked' you on the base of this: "The reduction in police officers is definitely a primary reason for the increase in crime in London." This stays completely false. But that paragraph about london police is very interesting. I don't have time now to read the article, I might try to do it tonight.

                          I don't want to be too sceptical about the research you are talking about, issued by the government. It is well known within the academic community these studies can be very flawed, and I quote one Flemish minister I know personally: "we order studies just to prove we are right". And even the study was done in a scientific manner, which most of them are, then still only the results relevant to the ruling political party will be made public. Unless you read the full rapport, including remarks/debates of the researchers that executed it, it is wise to stay sceptical.
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                          • #14
                            Re: London murder rate overtakes New York for first time eve

                            Thank you Theresa May

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                            • #15
                              I actually feel very safe in London when I’m there, as I do in nyc. Just my point of view...a major city where I feel a bit more unsafe is actually paris
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                              • #16


                                London knife crime: Two dead after seven stabbings in another weekend of violence

                                'Friendly, hardworking' shopkeeper knifed in robbery - London's 29th killing this year


                                A newsagent stabbed to death during another weekend of bloodshed in London was a “pillar of the community,” friends said today.

                                The 54-year-old shopkeeper, named locally as Ravi, was knifed during a robbery as he opened his business in Pinner early yesterday morning.

                                His death marked the 29th killing in London so far this year and came after a 17-year-old boy, named as Abdirashid Mohamoud, was stabbed to death by a masked man outside a block of flats in Isleworth on Friday night.

                                Detectives said the teenager had been in nearby Syon Park with friends when a gang pulled up in a car and chased him into Union Lane where he was attacked.

                                He is the seventh teenager to be stabbed to death in the capital this year. At least five other people were injured in knife attacks over the weekend. One man, in his forties, was critically injured in hospital today after being stabbed in Hackney at 3.15am yesterday.

                                The shopkeeper was attacked in what locals believe was a “planned robbery” at the Marsh Food and Wine store at about 6am yesterday. Medics battled to save him but he was pronounced dead at the scene 45 minutes later. His murder is the 12th in London this month.

                                Friends and customers today paid tribute to the man who was originally from Sri Lanka and is said to have lived and worked in Pinner for more than 20 years. Shopkeeper Siva Lingam, who works at AVS Food and Grocery opposite, said: “We are all so sad. He was a very nice, quiet man. I can’t believe anyone would hurt him.

                                “This robbery must have been planned. They knew he was coming in early to do the Sunday papers. People must have been watching him and knew his routine.”

                                A customer said the victim, who is believed to be a father of two school-age children, was a “pillar of the community”. Another added: “He was an extremely friendly, polite and hard-working man.”

                                Detectives are searching for a black Vauxhall Astra that was driven away at speed down Cecil Park immediately after the attack. They added they believe the victim was knifed by a man who robbed the shop and stole its till.

                                Local MP and policing minister Nick Hurd tweeted: “Deeply saddened to hear of a fatal stabbing in Marsh Road Pinner earlier this morning. It appears to be a case of a robbery that escalated.”

                                In other incidents, a 13-year-old boy was knifed in St Matthew’s Road, Brixton early yesterday morning and on Saturday evening at 10.30pm two young men were found stabbed in Harrow Road, Westminster.

                                Earlier on Saturday a man in his twenties was taken to hospital after he was stabbed in High Street, Barkingside.

                                None of their injuries are said to be life-threatening. Police said no arrests have been made so far.

                                A teenager was fighting for life today after being hit by a bus while fleeing police on a moped, Scotland Yard said.

                                The 17-year-old was struck after failing to stop for officers in Putney in the early hours. Officers had been on an unconnected 999 call when they spotted the moped rider and asked him to stop.

                                He drove off, and collided with the bus a short time later. A spokeswoman for the Met said: “At around 1.20am a police vehicle was responding to an emergency call.

                                “Unrelated to this first emergency call, the rider of a motorcycle made off from the responding officers in Putney High Street near the junction with Upper Richmond Road. The officers had then begun to follow this vehicle, when the moped was in collision with a bus on Upper Richmond Road.

                                “The moped rider — a 17-year-old male — was taken to hospital. His condition has been assessed as life-threatening.”

                                The spokeswoman added: “The motorcycle was found to have been reported stolen.” The case is now being investigated by the Met’s Directorate of Professional Standards.

                                https://www.standard.co.uk/news/crim...-a4099951.html
                                Knife crime hasn't subsided in the year that has passed since this topic was opened, it's actually worsening - a real epidemic among predominantly young males, and primarily in London.

                                If you're UK based, I'd suggest watching 24 Hours in Police Custody from last night - it's a fascinating insight into the role that the police play in investigating the crime once its happened. But it really does make you question the role that other agencies play in the run up to the crime occurring.

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                                • #17
                                  I watched 24HIPC, it was one of the more hard-hitting episodes for sure. Such senseless violence, and it’s worrying to see how young men don’t even flinch when they find out they’ve caused the death of another person - it seems like the government just don’t know how to tackle it because they’re so far removed from the people who are involved.

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                                  • #18
                                    I go to London twice every year and besides being the city in europe that I love the most, I always felt very safe there.
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                                    • #19
                                      I am not saying innocent crime doesn’t happen, but a lot of the time, the victim is known to the perpetrator and vice-versa.
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                                      • #20
                                        In my opinion, knife crife is the derivative of assault rifles being banned, there are vile & sick people everywhere and sadly their intentions can't be predicted or controlled.
                                        There's only so much the police officers can do. Stop-and-frisk to me is an attempt to find an easy solution for a complicated issue.
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