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Thank u, next! Why pop stars fell out of love with albums ...

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  • Thank u, next! Why pop stars fell out of love with albums ...

    Thank u, next! Why pop stars fell out of love with albums

    Chart-toppers used to focus on long-players. Now, in the streaming era, they can release tracks whenever they like – and many, including Ariana Grande, have decided to do just that ...
    The Guardian
    2019 Year End Charts: The 20/20 Experience

  • #2
    A bit strange as Ariana released two long players in the last six months.

    Though I do agree that albums are not that important anymore.
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    • #3
      Most pop stars always focused on singles, even at the peak of album sales.
      >>>>>>>>>>> LAST.FM <<<<<<<<<

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      • #4
        Originally posted by RayRay View Post
        A bit strange as Ariana released two long players in the last six months.

        Though I do agree that albums are not that important anymore.
        I think what the article wants to say is that the album is - if it is released at all - just an extra at the 'end' of a campaign full of singles.
        2019 Year End Charts: The 20/20 Experience

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        • #5
          Kylie's campaign begs to differ.
          Originally posted by SummerPeur
          Time stops for the Kween everytime WBT is performed.
          Originally posted by Goldmoney
          So does her microphone

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          • #6
            Originally posted by SummerPeur View Post
            Kylie's campaign begs to differ.
            Exactly.
            I am not trying to seduce you... Would you like me to seduce you? Is that what you're trying to tell me?

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            • #7
              It's like music videos. They drop them so fast that the era is over after the album is released.
              Taylor Swift - Colbie Caillat - Carrie Underwood - Miranda Lambert

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              • #8
                It might be dependent on the country. In the German-speaking countries, the artists that could be considered 'pop stars' usually do much better with their albums than with their singles.
                WHEN WE ALL FALL ASLEEP, WHERE DO WE GO?

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                • #9
                  Yeah nowadays the album is pretty much the last chapter of the era, if we can still talk about era anyway.
                  5.05.2009 / 6.22.2011 / 4.24.2013 / 4.25.2013 / 3.1.2014 / 9.13.2014 / 7.21.2016 / 7.14.2018 / 7.15.2018

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                  • #10
                    I think albums fell out of favor not because of the artists, but because the public has stopped buying albums.

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                    • #11
                      The problem i have with albums is filler. An album with 10 amazing songs is far more appealing to me than an album of 18 songs where i only love about 7 tracks - that leaves 11 songs that i have no desire to go back and listen to numerous times.

                      If albums remained concise and full of quality i'd buy more albums.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by JakeP View Post
                        The problem i have with albums is filler. An album with 10 amazing songs is far more appealing to me than an album of 18 songs where i only love about 7 tracks - that leaves 11 songs that i have no desire to go back and listen to numerous times.

                        If albums remained concise and full of quality i'd buy more albums.
                        I love longer albums. Everyone has their own favorite songs. With short albums you can like 6 songs and then you hear the left out tracks and you think: "If they released a 16 track album, I would have loved 10 songs!"
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                        • #13
                          Let's see why releasing songs straight to streaming instead of digital/physical albums is popular and can be lucrative:

                          Spotify royalty rate per stream is reportedly $0.00437

                          'Hit' songs with 100 million streams can generate $437,000 from Spotify alone + royalties from other streaming services + radio royalties + TV/Film licencing = $$$$$$

                          I can record and release a professionally mastered song in a studio for as little as £350. It is profitable!

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by RayRay View Post
                            I love longer albums. Everyone has their own favorite songs. With short albums you can like 6 songs and then you hear the left out tracks and you think: "If they released a 16 track album, I would have loved 10 songs!"
                            That's the exact issue i'm referring to though.

                            For eg when The Weeknd released Starboy there were about 9 songs of the album i thought were really strong. The rest of the album did nothing for me. I'd have quite happily bought that album had it been 10 or 11 tracks total with just 2 songs i'd personally consider as filler. Sadly sometimes the strongest songs only appear on the deluxe edition. lol

                            I suppose its all down to personal preference. Sometimes album tracks can grow with multiple listens but usually if i don't like the sound of a track on first listen, it's highly unlikely i'll ever like that song. I know what i love.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by JakeP View Post
                              That's the exact issue i'm referring to though.

                              For eg when The Weeknd released Starboy there were about 9 songs of the album i thought were really strong. The rest of the album did nothing for me. I'd have quite happily bought that album had it been 10 or 11 tracks total with just 2 songs i'd personally consider as filler. Sadly sometimes the strongest songs only appear on the deluxe edition. lol

                              I suppose its all down to personal preference. Sometimes album tracks can grow with multiple listens but usually if i don't like the sound of a track on first listen, it's highly unlikely i'll ever like that song. I know what i love.
                              That's the thing though. If it had been a 10 track album with just 2 songs you liked... Everybody has different favorite songs. So if there would only be 10 track albums, there would be a big chance that a lot of great songs wouldn't be released.
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                              • #16
                                Gone are the days when people listen to albums from start to end. There's just way more things to do than listen to a full album, and support the release of succeeding singles after the album is out. Only die-hard music fans do that and there aren't as much these days. Looks like the trend these days are three major singles per album if we look at the Drake and Ariana singles from last year.

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                                • #17
                                  Originally posted by GetBack View Post
                                  Gone are the days when people listen to albums from start to end. There's just way more things to do than listen to a full album, and support the release of succeeding singles after the album is out. Only die-hard music fans do that and there aren't as much these days. Looks like the trend these days are three major singles per album if we look at the Drake and Ariana singles from last year.
                                  A lot of musicians in Croatia have been doing this for nearly a decade now. Especially pop ones. Album sales have always been low here and single market wasn't something that ever truly existed. So they just release singles to stay in the limelight, get YT views and radio support and make concerts. They release 8-9 singles in 2-3 years, then release album of those with some new songs that eventually become singles. I could see the global market eventually going this route. It will definitely maximize the impact of all songs instead of some falling into obscurity because people skip them when playing the album.
                                  I have received many gifts from God,
                                  but this is the first time I have ever received a gift from a goddess
                                  .

                                  Don McLean on Madonna's version of American Pie

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                                  • #18
                                    Originally posted by ludichris View Post
                                    Let's see why releasing songs straight to streaming instead of digital/physical albums is popular and can be lucrative:

                                    Spotify royalty rate per stream is reportedly $0.00437

                                    'Hit' songs with 100 million streams can generate $437,000 from Spotify alone + royalties from other streaming services + radio royalties + TV/Film licencing = $$$$$$

                                    I can record and release a professionally mastered song in a studio for as little as £350. It is profitable!
                                    I am absolutely sure I read an article where someone created an album of silence, setup a whole bunch of fake accounts and had bots streaming his album in order to make money.
                                    M08T10

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                                    • #19
                                      In 2005/2006, Britney Spears recorded a few songs with an overall darker sound for a then-upcoming album. One of them, 'Mona Lisa', would later become a popular theme for fanfiction due to the line 'She's been cloned'. I'm not trying to debate whether that line is fact or fiction, BUT it would be cool if an act actually put the effort into creating an era lyrically based on the idea of a popstar getting cloned, dropping hints in the music videos etc. and, therefore, leading to the fans passionately discuss whether the story's real or fake. At a time, when albums seem to lose relevance in modern music consumption, artists should really start making an event out of their albums by telling weird stories etc. As much as I love albums like Rihanna's 'Loud' or Katy Perry's 'Teenage Dream', they are really just a collection of hit songs, and I believe that the format has much more to offer. In fact, I can only think of Marina & The Diamonds who really made an event out of the persona 'Electra Heart' by dedicading a whole album to her, showing her progression in the music videos, dressing like her and even announcing her death publicly. She's never really been a mainstream act, but wouldn't it be great if Ariana Grande, Taylor Swift or Lady Gaga released an album with the complexity of 'Electra Heart'? I'm sure that would boost the format's appeal a lot since you can't tell a story with many twists and subplots in 3 minutes 30 seconds.
                                      WHEN WE ALL FALL ASLEEP, WHERE DO WE GO?

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                                      • #20
                                        Back in the day (ie, pre-digital) the money was made in album sales and concert revenue after that. Singles - although plenty of them sold a lot and made money - were always the trailers and a way to attract people to an album. It was a straight-forward process. It did mean though that if you liked two or three songs, you bought an album and there was a risk that you wouldn't like any other songs.

                                        Now, the power is back in the hands of the consumer - you can decide which ones you like before committing to purchasing. The inevitable consequence is that albums are generally more disposable. Most artists don't make the effort to 'tell a story' or whatever. They need a collection of songs that will do the job IF the odd person decides to invest, but albums aren't where money is made. In fact, in a lot of cases, except for touring revenue, money is made from an artist brand and their outside-of-music endeavours.
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                                        ♬ Keen addictions, between afflictions, I guess I had it coming...

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