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Adele - 30

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  • Originally posted by InFamous View Post

    There has been a thread for this in the songs chart for hours
    Is Bland On Me not a part of this record?

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    • Originally posted by Goldmoney View Post
      Is Bland On Me not a part of this record?
      Obviously, but he clearly posted it now thinking it was an exclusive
      Zero tolerance for : bigotry, racism, wilful ignorance.
      Pronouns: He / Him

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      • Why is it called 30 tho?

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        • Originally posted by jason2379 View Post
          Why is it called 30 tho?
          Prolly the length of the album after 5 years of waiting.

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          • Doesn't she usually name them after the age she was when she wrote the songs or when the life events that inspire the songs happened?

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            • Imo, it only makes sense that the currently biggest two musicians by far stick with their way of naming their albums: Ed Sheeran using mathematical signs, Adele ages.
              According to Wikipedia, she started working on the album in 2018, at the age of 30. Though it would have, imo, also made sense to name it 31 since that's the age when she separated from her husband.
              Pro: freedom of speech
              Contra: cancel culture

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              • Originally posted by Thriller View Post
                Doesn't she usually name them after the age she was when she wrote the songs or when the life events that inspire the songs happened?
                Think so. That's what I read about her other albums (25 wasn't released when she was 25).
                My Instagram... - Click here

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                • She recorded it – like a lot of the album – for her son, she says, as, already a touch damp-eyed, I hand back her earbuds. “My son has had a lot of questions. Really good questions, really innocent questions, that I just don’t have an answer for.” Like? “‘Why can’t you still live together?’” She sighs. Gone are players and cads as song fodder (mostly). This is the deep sea of motherhood. “I just felt like I wanted to explain to him, through this record, when he’s in his twenties or thirties, who I am and why I voluntarily chose to dismantle his entire life in the pursuit of my own happiness. It made him really unhappy sometimes. And that’s a real wound for me that I don’t know if I’ll ever be able to heal.”

                  [...]

                  Yet the source material had already happened. “I assumed it would be about my divorce but it’s kind of not. Well,” she self-corrects, “that song obviously is.” (Over the course of our hours together, she will play me four more songs – they all sound pretty divorce-y to me.) She hands over the earbuds again and hits play on her phone. What follows is the discombobulating experience of listening to one of popular music’s greatest emoters singing an absolute belter of a relationship takedown while she watches for reactions.

                  Written about her first forays into dating post-marriage, the failings of men are writ large. Laziness, opaque emotions, remoteness, as she implores its subject to give her a bit more goddam respect. “No, but say what you really mean,” I laugh somewhat nervously when it’s over, and she looks pleased. “The chorus is like… with receipts!” she nods happily. “Can you imagine couples listening to it in the car? It’d be so awkward. I think a lot of women are going to be like, ‘I’m done.’

                  “That one is obviously about stuff that happened, but I wanted to put it on the album to show Angelo what I expect him to treat his partner like, whether it be a woman or a man or whatever. After going through a divorce, my requirements are sky-high. There’s a very big pair of shoes to fill.”

                  [...]

                  Clearly, there has been a professional evolution to match the personal one. Musically, the range on the new album – from her usual singer-songwriter gear to midnight chanteuse to chilled Balearic club at sundown – has never been more eclectic. As ever, she is proud of the secrecy around it and her plans for its roll-out. “I think I’m actually one of the most punk artists around,” she says, a minxy glint in her eye. “My music, absolutely not. But the way I move is very punk.”

                  She thinks back to the creation of her past smash hits. “I was drunk as a fart on 21; I really don’t remember much, I just remember being really sad. On 25, I was obviously sober as anything, because I was a new mum. That one, I was sort of more in tune with what I thought people might want or not want. With this one,” she says of the upcoming release, “I made the very conscious decision to be like, for the first time in my life, actually, ‘What do I want?’”

                  She gathered some of her closest collaborators: producer Greg Kurstin, who worked with her on 25; supreme pop hitmaker Max Martin; and her new favourite, Inflo, the London-based producer known for his work with Little Simz and Sault. She even pulled in Swedish composer and producer Ludwig Göransson, who won an Academy Award for his Black Panther score and has worked closely with Childish Gambino. Once again, however, for anyone out there waiting for that Beyoncé duet or Kendrick verse, there are no featured performers on the record. We may live in the era of the big-fish collaboration, but when you’re one of the biggest fish of all it seems it’s never quite worth it. “It’s not that I don’t want to,” she says, airily. “It’s not calculated. It’s just never been right for some reason.”

                  Ultimately, perhaps, the work is just too personal. Is pouring your life into your music the therapy it’s cracked up to be, I wonder? “I definitely feel like when my life is spiralling out of control I want to be in the studio because no one can get me,” she replies, staring at the road ahead. “I don’t have to deal with any issues, any problems. I think it’s less, ‘My world is falling apart, I need to go and write about it,’ it’s more just my safe space.”
                  https://www.vogue.co.uk/arts-and-lif...ogue-interview

                  5.05.2009 / 6.22.2011 / 4.24.2013 / 4.25.2013 / 3.1.2014 / 9.13.2014 / 7.21.2016 / 7.14.2018 / 7.15.2018

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                  • The first song she plays is the first song on the album, a gut-wrenching plea of a piano ballad, the chorus of which goes: “Go easy on me baby / I was still a child / Didn’t get the chance to / Feel the world around me.” Her voice does different impossible Adele-ish things with the refrain “go easy,” and although it starts to take on a euphoric tone, by the end, I feel pummeled. “So that’s that one,” she says quietly. “Do you like it?” (Perhaps the only thing more surreal than having Adele play you her new music in her kitchen is the revelation that she feels nervous and vulnerable doing so.)

                    “It’s sensitive for me, this record, just in how much I love it. I always say that 21 doesn’t belong to me anymore. Everyone else took it into their hearts so much. I’m not letting go of this one”

                    She queues up another one. “The next song is the one I wrote when I went to the studio the day after Angelo said I can’t see you.” A certain combination of elements—sexy ’70s groove, heavy strings, heavier lyrics—immediately calls to mind Marvin Gaye. (What’s Going On was a “very big reference” on the album, turns out.) “My little love,” Adele sings in a low, smoky register. “I see your eyes / Widen like an ocean / When you look at me / So full of my emotions.” Between verses are snippets of conversations she had with Angelo during the Year of Anxiety, recorded at her therapist’s suggestion. The song ends with bits of a raw, teary voicemail she left for a friend. She was inspired to incorporate voice notes by Tyler, the Creator and the British rapper Skepta, she explains. “I thought it might be a nice touch, seeing as everyone’s been at my door for the last 10 years, as a fan, to be like, Would you like to come in?

                    I’m not sure I will survive another of Adele’s new songs, but as she plays four more, it becomes clear that they are mapping a progression. The next one is cathartic, a soulful promise of new love that has her repeating variations of: “I just want to love you for free / Everybody wants something from me / You just want me.” The fourth song is downright upbeat, meant to be a laugh-while-you’re-crying respite from the heaviness—“Otherwise we’d all kill ourselves, wouldn’t we?” Then comes a joyous anthem. Over gospelly organ she sings: “Let time be patient / Let pain be gracious.” Toward the end a chorus of her friends chimes in, chant-singing, “Just hold on, just hold on,” over and over. “The thing that they’re all singing is what my friends used to say to me,” Adele explains. “That’s why I wanted them to sing it, rather than an actual choir.”

                    The last song she plays is the final song on the album. It was written and recorded while a TV in the studio played Breakfast at Tiffany’s on mute, she explains. “As it finished, we were trying to work out how to end the song, and I said, We should write it as if we were writing the soundtrack—you know, at the end of the movie, where it pans out.” The arrangement is whimsical and wall-of-sound retro, full of strings and vibrato and midcentury romance, but the lyrics deliver a subversive twist. The first line: “All your expectations of my love are impossible.”

                    She wrote both the piano ballad and the song about Angelo with Greg Kurstin, with whom she wrote “Hello.” Later, I ask Kurstin by phone about writing songs with Adele. “She has this way of tackling very complex emotional subject matter that I’ve never seen,” he says. “Also there’s this commitment to a song idea, where if the opening line of a song resonates with her, we could be working on it over the course of years, just perfecting it.” Kurstin adds, “She pushes me to places that are very unexpected on the piano. Sometimes I’ll be looping a progression for hours while she’s figuring out the lyrics. It’s almost like a meditation.”

                    The friend-chorus song and the Breakfast at Tiffany’s song were written with Inflo, the producer from North London who works a lot with Danger Mouse. “He’s brutally honest with me, like no one else would dare,” Adele says of Inflo. “He’s sort of got this constant resting bitch face, really.” A handful of others worked on songs I didn’t hear: the Swedish pop wizards Max Martin and Shellback; the Swedish composer Ludwig Göransson; and the Canadian singer-songwriter Tobias Jesso Jr., on a “very powerful song” she describes as “an Édith Piaf-y moment.” As with her previous albums, the vocal tracks are original demos because, she explains, demos have a charisma and an urgency that get lost if you rerecord them. “I never redo my vocals. Never. Never ever.
                    https://www.vogue.com/article/adele-cover-november-2021
                    5.05.2009 / 6.22.2011 / 4.24.2013 / 4.25.2013 / 3.1.2014 / 9.13.2014 / 7.21.2016 / 7.14.2018 / 7.15.2018

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                    • Getting curious now.
                      My Instagram... - Click here

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                      • This would have been the perfect time for a King duet, I don’t think it’s happening.

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                        • After reading this interview, i wish we could get the whole album on October 15, not just the lead single!
                          And the 8th day God created KYLIE!!! <3

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                          • Originally posted by GreekGeek View Post
                            After reading this interview, i wish we could get the whole album on October 15, not just the lead single!
                            on the other hand, just imagine how huge seller it will be when releasing during Xmas shopping, I think it's smart move to push it to November or December
                            KUBA'S CHART

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                            • the interview(s) relaly gave a nice insight and got me really anticipated for this.

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                              • Really interesting interview, definitely has me hyped. Not sure what to make of the conversations in the background and her friends doing the choir bit, but I guess we’ll see!
                                You say that I must eat so many lemons, cos I am so Bitt-er

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                                • I can't wait for the Marvin Gaye inspired song and the stuff she's did with Inflo. I love Sault!

                                  I love reading that she keeps her demo vocals because she feels the those takes carry the most emotions. An artist!!!

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                                  • An Adull Soul Train type song?

                                    I kinda want to hear it.

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                                    • I really hope for more uptempo songs - and yes, her type of music offers room for that, too!
                                      Pro: freedom of speech
                                      Contra: cancel culture

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                                      • Max Martin ? Looks like Adele is looking for her Teenage Dream moment
                                        Zero tolerance for : bigotry, racism, wilful ignorance.
                                        Pronouns: He / Him

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                                        • She already worked with Max Martin on “Send My Love(To Your New Lover)”.

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                                          • Out Nov 19

                                            See The Mariah Carey Discography Rate
                                            See The Report Card - Weekly Top Songs

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                                            • Not a fan of the cover if that is the composition they actually used, but I like the colors and am curious for the music

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                                              • I'm curious to see the numbers. It's going to be hard reaching everything 25 did or longetivity 21 had.
                                                BEST SONGS&ALBUMS OF 2017
                                                YOURS, FOREVER. // JOSS JONES (Tracklist)

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                                                • Surely that’s not the cover
                                                  Bleep Bloop Blop

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                                                  • Does no one find it weird there's been no pre-save//pre-order for either "Easy On Me" or "30"? The high 1st week sales of "25" were driven by record pre-order numbers. I guess she could always announce on Friday.

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