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UKmix Retro Charts Records :: Chart Facts, Year-End charts, Records and more... First Cycle 2010-2019

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  • #26
    I love BJ Thomas's "Raindrops"... Such a great message that song.

    "Suspicious Minds" is my favourite Elvis song. I like MJ's falsetto on "I'll Be There", but the song hasn't aged well. "Your Song" is my favourite Elton John song.

    "I Want You Back" and "ABC" are okay. I really have grown out of the Jackson 5's music. "Ain't No Mountain High Enough" is one of my all-time favourite songs. I find the spoken bits especially powerful.

    "Let It Be" is phenomenal. I think it's still among my top 50 songs ever. "Bridge over Troubled Water" is a mega-classic. The Aretha Franklin interpretation is pretty damn amazing, too.

    The Beatles were probably my fave act of 1970.

    Moving on to 1980...

    "On the Radio" deserves to be higher! Such a disco classic! "Hit Me with Your Best Shot" is okay.

    "Super Trouper" is good.
    Akini's Top 100 Artists of the Decade: [10-8]

    Comment


    • #27
      Originally posted by JSparksFan View Post
      I love BJ Thomas's "Raindrops"... Such a great message that song.

      "Suspicious Minds" is my favourite Elvis song. I like MJ's falsetto on "I'll Be There", but the song hasn't aged well. "Your Song" is my favourite Elton John song.

      "I Want You Back" and "ABC" are okay. I really have grown out of the Jackson 5's music. "Ain't No Mountain High Enough" is one of my all-time favourite songs. I find the spoken bits especially powerful.

      "Let It Be" is phenomenal. I think it's still among my top 50 songs ever. "Bridge over Troubled Water" is a mega-classic. The Aretha Franklin interpretation is pretty damn amazing, too.

      The Beatles were probably my fave act of 1970.

      Moving on to 1980...

      "On the Radio" deserves to be higher! Such a disco classic! "Hit Me with Your Best Shot" is okay.

      "Super Trouper" is good.
      Thanks for sharing!

      - For me, Suspicious Minds is also amongst Elvis best songs. The structure is very interesting, kind of addicitive. The live performance I linked was really energetic.
      - Let it Be is perfect pop song for me.
      - in the 80s, we had a lot of rock fans voting apparently, and also some very surprising hits like Captain Beaky and Day Trip To Bangor, which only peaked at #18 each but still manged longevity and that's why they ranked! In the second cycle, the one we are currently voting for, the top40 will look pretty different!
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      ENJOY Hits in the Mix! weekly chart @ General Music

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      • #28
        Originally posted by Leo View Post
        Thanks for sharing!

        - For me, Suspicious Minds is also amongst Elvis best songs. The structure is very interesting, kind of addicitive. The live performance I linked was really energetic.
        - Let it Be is perfect pop song for me.
        - in the 80s, we had a lot of rock fans voting apparently, and also some very surprising hits like Captain Beaky and Day Trip To Bangor, which only peaked at #18 each but still manged longevity and that's why they ranked! In the second cycle, the one we are currently voting for, the top40 will look pretty different!
        I just watched the "Suspicious Minds" performance. It was pretty passionate indeed.

        Yeah, I think "Let It Be" is incredibly therapeutic.
        Akini's Top 100 Artists of the Decade: [10-8]

        Comment


        • #29
          1980 Year-End Chart :: Part III



          20. Lipps, Inc - Funkytown

          Retro Debut: week 14, 1980
          Retro Peak: #1 (5 weeks)
          Retro Chart run: 1 - 1 - 1 - 1 - 1 - 12 - 19 - 39 - 50 - 64 - 54 - 24 - 43 - 44 - 19 - 25 - 23 - 48 - 59 - 59 (20 weeks)
          Facts: It reached the top spot in the United States, West Germany, Canada, Austria, Switzerland, Norway, the Netherlands, and Australia, among many others. The song expresses the singer's pining for a metaphorical place that will "keep me movin', keep me groovin' with some energy". Steven wrote the song while the band was living in Minneapolis with dreams of moving to New York. VH1 ranked the song at number 36 in their list of the 100 Greatest One-Hit Wonders of the 1980s in 2009. Time Out listed the song number 44 in their list of The 100 best party songs in 2018.



          19. John Lennon - (Just Like) Starting Over

          Retro Debut: week 45, 1980
          Retro Peak: #1 (1 week)
          Retro Chart run: 1 - 2 - 3 - 3 - 6 - 7 - 6 - 7 (8 weeks - pending 1981 run)
          Facts: It reached number one in both the US and UK after Lennon was murdered on 8 December 1980. In 2013, Billboard Magazine ranked it as the 62nd biggest song of all time on the Billboard Hot 100 charts. "(Just Like) Starting Over" was the first single released from Double Fantasy and the first new recording Lennon had released since he left the music industry in 1975. It was chosen by Lennon not because he felt it was the best track on the album, but because it was the most appropriate following his five-year absence from the recording industry. Although its origins were in unfinished demo compositions like "Don't Be Crazy" and "My Life", it was one of the last songs to be completed in time for the Double Fantasy sessions.



          18. Marti Webb - Take That Look Off Your Face

          Retro Debut: week 7, 1980
          Retro Peak: #7
          Retro Chart run: 11 - 11 - 10 - 10 - 7 - 30 - 11 - 10 - 17 - 19 - 16 - 18 - 20 - 22 - 20 - 22 - 22 - 23 - 18 - 14 - 16 - 17 - 19 - 17 - 16 - 17 - 18 - 18 - 17 - 16 (30 weeks)
          Facts: It is the title of a hit song by musical theatre composer Andrew Lloyd Webber. Collaborating with lyricist Don Black, it was written for the song cycle show Tell Me on a Sunday in 1978. It was sung and released by Marti Webb in 1980, and became a No. 3 hit in the UK charts. The song is about a woman being told of her boyfriend's infidelity. The woman denies this initially, before rebuking her newsbearer (a girlfriend) with the revelation that she "knew before" and had done for some time. She also spends much of the song criticising her friend for rushing to break the "bad news" to her.



          17. Kate Bush - Babooshka

          Retro Debut: week 28, 1980
          Retro Peak: #2
          Retro Chart run: 2 - 3 - 4 - 4 - 6 - 9 - 16 - 13 - 18 - 17 - 16 - 19 - 21 - 38 - 42 - 34 - 35 - 32 - 42 - 48 - 52 - 51 - 48 - 51 - 49 (25 weeks - pending 1981 run)
          Facts: According to an interview Kate Bush gave to the Australian TV series Countdown in 1980, the song chronicles a wife's desire to test her husband's loyalty. To do so, she takes on the nom de plume of Babooshka and sends notes to her husband in the guise of a younger woman—something which she fears is the opposite of how her husband currently sees her (hence the barbed lines "Just like his wife before she 'freezed' on him/Just like his wife when she was beautiful".) The trap is set when, in her bitterness and paranoia, Babooshka arranges to meet her husband, who is attracted to the character who reminds him of his wife in earlier times. She thereby ruins the relationship due to her paranoia.



          16. Bette Midler - The Rose

          Retro Debut: week 13, 1980
          Retro Peak: #4
          Retro Chart run: 4 - 6 - 8 - 12 - 12 - 14 - 21 - 29 - 35 - 30 - 32 - 28 - 10 - 9 - 10 - 14 - 16 - 14 - 25 - 27 - 27 - 25 - 25 - 26 - 26 - 28 - 29 - 33 - 26 - 30 (30 weeks)
          Facts: Bette Midler made the song famous when she recorded it for her 1979 film The Rose, in which it plays during the closing credits. It has been recorded multiple times including by Conway Twitty and Westlife who both had Number one hits with the song. Midler won the Grammy Award for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance for "The Rose", beating out formidable competition from Barbra Streisand and Donna Summer among others.



          15. Blondie - The Tide Is High

          Retro Debut: week 46, 1980
          Retro Peak: #1 (2 weeks)
          Retro Chart run: 1 - 1 - 2 - 4 - 5 - 4 - 5 (7 weeks - pending 1981 run)
          Facts: It is a 1967 song written by John Holt, originally produced by Duke Reid and performed by the Jamaican group The Paragons, with Holt as lead singer. The song gained international attention in 1980, when a reggae version by the American band Blondie became a US/UK number one hit. It was released as the lead single from the band's fifth studio album, Autoamerican (1980), giving Blondie their third number one single on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart and their fifth in the UK (where it became Blondie's last British number one for 18 years, until "Maria" in February 1999).



          14. AC/DC - You Shook Me All Night Long

          Retro Debut: week 37, 1980
          Retro Peak: #2
          Retro Chart run: 3 - 3 - 3 - 2 - 3 - 3 - 4 - 7 - 13 - 36 - 22 - 25 - 31 - 35 - 37 - 17 (16 weeks - pending 1981 run)
          Facts: It is AC/DC's first single with Brian Johnson as the lead singer, replacing Bon Scott who died of alcohol poisoning in February 1980. It reached number 35 on the USA's Hot 100 pop singles chart in 1980. The single was re-released internationally in 1986, following the release of the album Who Made Who. In January 2018, as part of Triple M's "Ozzest 100", the 'most Australian' songs of all time, "You Shook Me All Night Long" was ranked number 63. "You Shook Me All Night Long" placed at number 10 on VH1's list of "The 100 Greatest Songs of the 80s". It was also number 1 on VH1's "Top Ten AC/DC Songs". Guitar World placed "You Shook Me All Night Long" at number 80 on their "100 Greatest Guitar Solos" list.



          13. Barbra Streisand - Woman In Love

          Retro Debut: week 37, 1980
          Retro Peak: #1 (2 weeks)
          Retro Chart run: 1 - 1 - 2 - 3 - 5 - 5 - 8 - 8 - 12 - 14 - 11 - 10 - 14 - 27 - 42 - 61 (16 weeks - pending 1981 run)
          Facts: The song was written by Barry and Robin Gibb of the Bee Gees, who received the 1980 Ivor Novello award for Best Song Musically and Lyrically. It is her fourth of four Platinum records, and is considered her greatest international hit.



          12. Diana Ross - Upside Down

          Retro Debut: week 29, 1980
          Retro Peak: #1 (3 weeks)
          Retro Chart run: 1 - 1 - 1 - 2 - 4 - 7 - 8 - 10 - 22 - 21 - 26 - 31 - 36 - 34 - 35 - 40 - 41 - 49 - 58 - 62 - 62 (21 weeks)
          Facts: It is a song written and produced by Chic members Nile Rodgers and Bernard Edwards. It was recorded by American singer Diana Ross. The song was issued as a single through the Motown label in 1980, as the lead single from her tenth studio album, Diana. "Upside Down" hit number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart on September 6, 1980. It also hit number one on the Billboard Disco and Soul charts. The single was released a full four weeks after the album was released. It held down the number one spot for four weeks.



          11. David Bowie - Ashes To Ashes

          Retro Debut: week 34, 1980
          Retro Peak: #2
          Retro Chart run: 2 - 2 - 2 - 4 - 6 - 6 - 5 - 7 - 7 - 9 - 13 - 31 - 43 - 39 - 45 - 44 - 54 - 52 - 57 (19 weeks - pending 1981 run)
          Facts: It was the lead single from the 1980 album Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps) and became Bowie's second UK No. 1 single. It is also known for its innovative video, directed by Bowie and David Mallet, which at the time was the most expensive music video ever made. Interviewed in 1980, Bowie described the song as "very much a 1980s nursery rhyme. I think 1980s nursery rhymes will have a lot to do with the 1880s/1890s nursery rhymes which are all rather horrid and had little boys with their ears being cut off and stuff like that." Years later, Bowie said that with "Ashes to Ashes" he was "wrapping up the seventies really" for himself, which "seemed a good enough epitaph for it."
          VISIT UKmix HOT100 @ Front Desk
          ENJOY Hits in the Mix! weekly chart @ General Music

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          • #30
            1980 Year-End Chart :: Part IV



            10. Jam - Going Underground

            Retro Debut: week 13, 1980
            Retro Peak: #2
            Retro Chart run: 2 - 3 - 2 - 2 - 3 - 2 - 5 - 11 - 10 - 11 - 9 - 10 - 11 - 15 - 19 - 22 - 21 - 24 - 19 - 24 - 25 - 28 - 31 - 29 - 32 - 56 (26 weeks)
            Facts: It is the first British #1 chart single by The Jam, released in March 1980. It debuted at #1 in the UK Singles Chart, spending three weeks at the top. It was the first of three instant chart-toppers for the group. "Going Underground" was not released on any of the band's six studio albums, although it has appeared on many compilations and re-releases since then. The song covered important social issues of the time such as political corruption, voter apathy and Thatcherism. The song was ranked at #2 among the "Tracks of the Year" for 1980 by NME. In March 2005, Q magazine placed "Going Underground" at #73 in its list of the 100 Greatest Guitar Tracks, and in October 2006, placed it at #98 in its list of the 100 Greatest Songs Ever.



            9. Queen - Another One Bites The Dust

            Retro Debut: week 34, 1980
            Retro Peak: #1 (3 weeks)
            Retro Chart run: 1 - 1 - 1 - 2 - 5 - 4 - 6 - 11 - 10 - 17 - 37 - 42 - 50 - 37 - 33 - 45 - 43 - 66 - 23 (19 weeks - pending 1981 run)
            Facts: Written by bassist John Deacon, the song featured on the group's eighth studio album The Game (1980). The song was a worldwide hit, charting number one on the US Billboard Hot 100 for three weeks (their second number-one single in the country). The song won an American Music Award for Favorite Rock Single and also garnered a Grammy Award nomination for Best Rock Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal. In the early 80s, "Another One Bites the Dust" was one of many popular rock songs that Christian evangelists alleged contained subliminal messages through a technique called backmasking. It was claimed that the chorus, when played in reverse, can be heard as "Decide to smoke marijuana", "It's fun to smoke marijuana", or "Start to smoke marijuana".



            8. Joy Division - Love Will Tear Us Apart

            Retro Debut: week 27, 1980
            Retro Peak: #1 (1 week)
            Retro Chart run: 2 - 1 - 2 - 3 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 8 - 10 - 11 - 12 - 18 - 20 - 28 - 24 - 27 - 26 - 29 - 23 - 30 - 41 - 47 (22 weeks)
            Facts: Its lyrics were inspired by lead singer Ian Curtis' marital problems and struggles with mental illness. The single was released the month after Curtis' suicide. The song was certified platinum in the UK, selling over 600,000 copies, and has an ongoing legacy as a defining song of the era. In 2002, NME named "Love Will Tear Us Apart" as the greatest single of all time, while Rolling Stone named it one of the 500 best songs ever in 2004.



            7. Frank Sinatra - Theme From New York, New York

            Retro Debut: week 19, 1980
            Retro Peak: #1 (4 weeks)
            Retro Chart run: 1 - 1 - 1 - 2 - 1 - 2 - 4 - 10 - 11 - 15 - 20 - 20 - 12 - 23 - 20 - 26 - 27 - 33 - 38 - 39 - 36 - 41 - 47 - 51 - 43 - 42 - 39 - 44 - 50 - 56 (30 weeks)
            Facts: It is the theme song from the Martin Scorsese film New York, New York (1977), composed by John Kander, with lyrics by Fred Ebb. It was written for and performed in the film by Liza Minnelli. It remains one of the best-known songs about New York City. In 2004 it finished #31 on AFI's 100 Years...100 Songs survey of top tunes in American Cinema. In 1979, "Theme from New York, New York" was recorded by Frank Sinatra for his album Trilogy: Past Present Future (1980), and has since become closely associated with him.



            6. Pink Floyd - Another Brick In The Wall, Part 2

            Retro Debut: week 1, 1980
            Retro Peak: #1 (6 weeks)
            Retro Chart run: 1 - 1 - 1 - 1 - 1 - 1 - 3 - 5 - 7 - 9 - 18 - 18 - 42 - 44 - 46 - 61 - 55 - 48 - 58 - 68 - 68 (21 weeks - pendng 1979 run)
            Facts: "Another Brick in the Wall" is a three-part composition on Pink Floyd's 1979 rock opera The Wall, written by bassist Roger Waters. "Part 2", a protest song against rigid and abusive schooling, features a children's choir. At the suggestion of producer Bob Ezrin, Pink Floyd added elements of disco. It became their only number-one single in the UK, the United States, West Germany and many other countries, and sold over four million copies worldwide. It was nominated for a Grammy Award, and was number 384 on Rolling Stone's list of "The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time".



            5. Irene Cara - Fame

            Retro Debut: week 25, 1980
            Retro Peak: #1 (3 weeks)
            Retro Chart run: 1 - 1 - 1 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 8 - 13 - 10 - 12 - 13 - 14 - 20 - 22 - 26 - 21 - 23 - 18 - 22 - 19 - 25 - 27 - 26 - 23 - 24 - 26 - 28 (28 weeks - pending 1981 run)
            Facts: It is a pop song, written by Michael Gore (music) and Dean Pitchford (lyrics) and released in 1980, that achieved chart success as the theme song to the Fame film and TV series. The song was performed by Irene Cara, who played the role of Coco Hernandez in the original movie. It won the Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1980, and the Golden Globe Award the same year. In 2004 it finished at number 51 on AFI's 100 Years...100 Songs survey of top tunes in American cinema.



            4. Blondie - Atomic

            Retro Debut: week 9, 1980
            Retro Peak: #2
            Retro Chart run: 2 - 2 - 2 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 7 - 7 - 7 - 15 - 16 - 16 - 15 - 22 - 30 - 38 - 34 - 32 - 32 - 50 - 51 - 55 - 64 - 66 - 28 (27 weeks)
            Facts: It was composed by Jimmy Destri and Debbie Harry, who stated, "He was trying to do something like 'Heart of Glass', and then somehow or another we gave it the spaghetti western treatment. Before that it was just lying there like a lox. The lyrics, well, a lot of the time I would write while the band were just playing the song and trying to figure it out. I would just be scatting along with them and I would just start going, 'Ooooooh, your hair is beautiful.'" The word atomic in the song carries no fixed meaning and functions as a signifier of power and futurism.



            3. Police - Don't Stand So Close To Me

            Retro Debut: week 40, 1980
            Retro Peak: #1 (5 weeks)
            Retro Chart run: 1 - 1 - 1 - 1 - 1 - 2 - 4 - 6 - 6 - 13 - 15 - 9 - 11 (13 weeks - pending 1981 run)
            Facts: It is a hit song by the British rock band the Police, released in September 1980 as the lead single from their third album Zenyatta Mondatta. It concerns a schoolgirl's crush on her teacher which leads to an affair, which in turn is discovered. The band's third No. 1 on the UK Singles Chart, it was also the best selling single of 1980 in the UK. The song also charted in the top ten in Australia, Canada and the US. The Police won the 1982 Grammy Award for Best Rock Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal for this song. Before joining The Police, Sting had previously worked as an English teacher. Sting said of the song in 1981: I wanted to write a song about sexuality in the classroom. I'd done teaching practice at secondary schools and been through the business of having 15-year-old girls fancying me – and me really fancying them! How I kept my hands off them I don't know... Then there was my love for Lolita which I think is a brilliant novel.



            2. ABBA - The Winner Takes It All

            Retro Debut: week 32, 1980
            Retro Peak: #1 (2 weeks)
            Retro Chart run: 1 - 1 - 3 - 3 - 3 - 5 - 8 - 8 - 10 - 6 - 6 - 7 - 9 - 11 - 13 - 15 - 9 - 10 - 16 - 24 - 14 (21 weeks - pending 1981 run)
            Facts: Released as the first single from the group's Super Trouper album on 21 July 1980, it is a ballad in the key of F-sharp major, reflecting the end of a romance. It was the group's first single after a seven-month hiatus and peaked at No.1 in several countries, including the UK, where it became their eighth chart-topper. It was also the group's final top 10 hit in the United States. Ulvaeus denies the song is about his and Fältskog's divorce, saying the basis of the song "is the experience of a divorce, but it's fiction. 'Cause one thing I can say is that there wasn't a winner or a loser in our case. A lot of people think it's straight out of reality, but it's not".



            1. Blondie - Call Me

            Retro Debut: week 8, 1980
            Retro Peak: #1 (6 weeks)
            Retro Chart run: 1 - 1 - 1 - 1 - 1 - 1 - 2 - 6 - 3 - 4 - 3 - 3 - 4 - 2 - 8 - 8 - 7 - 13 - 16 - 28 - 61 (21 weeks)
            Facts: It is a song by the American new wave band Blondie and the theme to the 1980 film American Gigolo. Produced and co-written by Italian musician Giorgio Moroder and released in the US in early 1980 as a single, "Call Me" was No. 1 for six consecutive weeks on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, where it became the band's biggest single and second No. 1. It also hit No. 1 in the UK and Canada, where it became their fourth and second chart-topper, respectively. In the year-end chart of 1980, it was Billboard's No. 1 single and RPM magazine's No. 3 in Canada. Italian disco producer Giorgio Moroder originally asked Stevie Nicks from Fleetwood Mac to help compose and perform a song for the soundtrack, but she declined as a recently signed contract with Modern Records prevented her from working with Moroder.
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            • #31
              1980 Year-End Chart :: Part V - Artists


              20. Madness

              Retro Hits during 1980: The Prince (#44), My Girl (#10), Night Boat To Cairo (#19), Baggy Trousers (#8), Embarrassment (#27)


              The band's debut effort was a hit in UK and gave them 3 singles in 1980 Retro charts, one of them reached top10. The second album was also a hit and spawned two more singles into our charts, with the #8 peaked Baggy Trousers so far as its best ranked song. Although no songs reached the YE Top40 list, the band manages a Top20 in the Artist list!



              19. Kate Bush

              Retro Hits during 1980: Breathing (#17), Babooshka (#2), Army Dreamers (#15), December Will Be Magic Again (#59)


              Kate's album Never For Ever produced 1 UK Top10 and 2 UK Top20, and it's the exactly same in our charts! Babooshak was very close to open atop the charts but still managed a place in the songs Top40 Year-end chart, giving Kate a place also in the Artist list.



              18. Joy Division

              Retro Hits during 1980: Love Will Tear Us Apart (#1)


              The song preventing Babooshka to open at #1 was no other than Love Will Tear Us Apart, which in a rare feat rose 2-1 in its second week in the chart. The song managed 22 weeks in the charts, 9 of those in the top10, giving the band enough points to end up in the Artist's Top20 with just one hit.



              17. Clash

              Retro Hits during 1980: London Calling (#2), Train In Vain (#5), Bankrobber (#12), The Call Up (#64)


              Tha band released the London Calling single in 1979, and it kicked off the year 1980 at a solid #2 where it stayed for three weeks. Another top10 and a top20 pushed the band into this exclusive group.



              16. Frank Sinatra

              Retro Hits during 1980: Theme From New York, New York (#1)


              Frank was way ahead of his golden years in the industry, but once you reach Legend status any little spark can ignite your career and return to where you've always belonged. And NY was so big for him taht not inly it was Top2 for 6 weeks, 4 of which it was #1, but also today this song is undoubtly considered Frank's, even when it was a cover. Only one song is enough for Frank to break into this list.



              15. Jam

              Retro Hits during 1980: Eton Rifles (#32), Going Underground (#2), Start! (#11)


              The band kicked out the year with the last waves of the 1979 hit single Eron Riffles, but this year was strong with two UK #1s that managed a Top2 and a Top20 peaks. And this fueled the band to finish #15 in this list.



              14. Marti Webb

              Retro Hits during 1980: Take That Look Off Your Face (#7), Tell Me On A Sunday (#14)


              Two hits with two interesting and unusual chart runs put Martin in this position. First, Look took 5 weeks to peak at #7 adn then stayed in the Top20 for 25 of its 30-week run. LAter, Sunday opened outside the top20 and took 9 weeks to reach it's #14 peak. Longevity and resilience push her in the year's top artists list.



              13. Michael Jackson

              Retro Hits during 1980: Rock With You (#9), Off The Wall (#11), She's Out Of My Life (#3)


              One decade ago we say Jackson 5 amusing the airwaves, and this new deaced sees Michael alone but steill hitting. Three hit songs, although none of them made it into the Songs YE Top40 list. But the three hits reach certification status and that's why Jacko is here. And we should see him around in the years to come.



              12. David Bowie

              Retro Hits during 1980: John, I'm Only Dancing (Again) (#55), Alabama Song (#45), Ashes To Ashes (#2), Fashion (#6)


              Bowie was welcoming the new decade, or waiving the old one, by releaseing tow of his most distinctive tracks. But with such a discography it's hard to clasiffied which are his distinctive thracks and which aren't! Both reached Top10 status in the retro charts, pushing his name almost into the Artist's YE Top10!



              11. Diana Ross

              Retro Hits during 1980: It's My House (#35), Upside Down (#1), I'm Coming Out (#8), My Old Piano (#27), It's My Turn (#18)


              With what can be considered tow of her best releases ever, it seems unfair to find Diana right outside the year's top 10 artists list. Upsdie was a chart topper, but Coming Out "only" reached #8, probbaly the main reason for this final placing..



              10. Barbra Streisand

              Retro Hits during 1980: No More Tears (Enough Is Enough) with Donna Summer (#12), Kiss Me In The Rain (#24), Woman In Love (#1), Guilty with Barry Gibb (#10)


              What a year for Barbra!!! Her duet with Donna Summer, that started in 1979, navigated the start of the year with a solid #12 peak. And then she closed the year with her joint effort with Barry Gibb, giving her her first chart topper so far and another top10.!



              9. Donna Summer

              Retro Hits during 1980: No More Tears (Enough Is Enough) with Barbra Streisand (#12), Dim All The Lights (#24), On The Radio (#2), Sunset People (#27), Walk Away (#43), The Wanderer (#7), Cold Love (#19)


              Just like Barbra, Donna also strted the year with No More Tears, and followed with several tracks reaching the waves. Unlike Barbra, she could not hit the top, but scored 2 Top10 hits and, totalling points, ended up one step higher in the Artists YE list!



              8. Pat Benatar

              Retro Hits during 1980: Heartbreaker (#5), We Live For Love (#4), You Better Run (#7), Hit Me With Your Best Shot (#2)


              It was common for artist to release albums every yera back then. So Pat's In the Heat of the Night was followed by Crimes of Passion. So top10 hits Heartbreaker and We Live were followed by Top10 hits Run and Best Shot... 4 Top10 in a single year is big, so the only reason Pat is #8 was that each song had a "short" run in the charts.



              7. Irene Cara

              Retro Hits during 1980: Fame (#1), Out Here On My Own (#39)


              Irene is tht fifth female artist in a row protrayed in this year end list, a big improvement from 1960 that only had 2 and all out of the top10, and also from 1970s that had 2 in the top10. A monster chart topper is enough to push the artist to this place.



              6. Pink Floyd

              Retro Hits during 1980: Another Brick In The Wall, Part 2 (#1), Run Like Hell (#3)


              Pink Floyd has the longest running #1 of the year, and then a second Top10 hit relesed later in the year, so is no big surprise they are this high here. And Brick is, imo, one of the best songs of all time so they deserve this recognition.



              5. AC/DC

              Retro Hits during 1980: Touch Too Much (#2), Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap (#7), It's A Long Way To The Top (If You Wanna Rock N Roll) (#9), Whole Lotta Rosie (#12), High Voltage (#13), You Shook Me All Night Long (#2), Rock N' Roll Ain't Noise Pollution (#17), Back In Black (#1)


              An incredible year for the band, reaching five times the top10, two of them upto #2 and one right to the top! But with so many hits, they only managed 63 cummulative weeks in the charts this year so longevity pushed the final rank down.



              4. Queen

              Retro Hits during 1980: Crazy Little Thing Called Love (#7), Save Me (#4), Play The Game (#4), Another One Bites The Dust (#1), Need Your Loving Tonight (#24), Flash (#2)


              Another band with just a shocking spawn of hits all in one year, getting 5 Top10 hits including 1 chart topper. The band deffinetly impacted music history, and Dust is a strong part of that legacy, so it is fitting they end up this high this year.



              3. Police

              Retro Hits during 1980: Walking On The Moon (#18), Message In A Bottle (#6), So Lonely (#6), Six Pack (#29), Don't Stand So Close To Me (#1), De Do Do Do, De Da Da Da (#3)


              They started the year with the right foot, following a good 1979, and then closed the year with Stand at #1 and De Do and #3! Another band, the fourth in a row in this list, another group of musicians that definetly crafted songs that, like it or not, made history.



              2. ABBA

              Retro Hits during 1980: I Have A Dream (#3), Gimme Gimme Gimme (A Man After Midnight) (#13), Voulez-Vous (#16), The Winner Takes It All (#1), Super Trouper (#1)


              A mixed female-male band is our #2 this year, and a band from Sweden! But it is not as surprising, as ABBA defined music in the 70s! The year started with hits coming from the previous year, and then, with their last album, they brought back-to-back chart toppers. They are only one of two artists that managed two #1s in the same year, and the other will be our #1 artist...



              1. Blondie

              Retro Hits during 1980: Union City Blue (#4), Dreaming (#16), The Hardest Part (#13), Call Me (#1), Atomic (#2), The Tide Is High (#1)


              Another year with the #1 artist getting the #1 song! But seeing how Blondie scored three Top2 songs in a row, with Call Me blocking Atomic from the top, it's really no surprise that they are here. Debbie influenced a big number of 80s female artists, including the beloved Madonna, so this ranking in a way is showcasing how popular and transcendental the band was.
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              • #32
                1990 Year-End Chart :: Part I



                40. Nelson - (Can't Live Without Your) Love & Affection

                Retro Debut: week 28, 1990
                Retro Peak: #1 (2 weeks)
                Retro Chart run: 1 - 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 8 - 19 - 35 - 53 (9 weeks)
                Facts: The song was based on a crush on Cindy Crawford. The music video features model and actress Judie Aronson who first appears on the cover of a magazine called "Vague", a parody of Vogue magazine. The song itself is known for its technical drumming involving syncopation and double bass, and virtuoso guitar soloing. The song topped the Billboard Hot 100 on September 29th, 1990, becoming the only single from the band to top the chart. This made the Nelson, in which Nelson's own Matthew and Gunnar Nelson are the sons of Ricky Nelson, the only family to have three generations of number one singles.



                39. Belinda Carlisle - Summer Rain

                Retro Debut: week 4, 1990
                Retro Peak: #3
                Retro Chart run: 3 - 5 - 7 - 13 - 14 - 15 - 18 - 20 - 24 - 24 - 23 - 33 - 39 - 42 - 65 - OUT - RE:58 (16 weeks - pending 1991 run)
                Facts: The power ballad is about a man who goes away to war and leaves his wife, saying that nothing will change—they will be together forever and always. Although the conflict is unidentified, images in the video of a transport aircraft on an airfield and troops parachuting from transport aircraft suggest the man is an airborne soldier. The song is set in the present as his widow sings it, remembering the last time she saw him. Belinda Carlisle stated in May 2013 that this was her favorite of her own songs.



                38. Cure - Pictures Of You

                Retro Debut: week 14, 1990
                Retro Peak: #1 (1 week)
                Retro Chart run: 1 - 3 - 4 - 7 - 12 - 18 - 20 - 24 - 21 - 45 - 39 - 35 - 44 - 47 - 50 - 81 (16 weeks)
                Facts: It is the fourth and final single from the British rock band the Cure's 1989 album Disintegration. Called "chilly goth-rock" and "accessible...synth-pop", the song has a single version which is a shorter edit of the album version. According to interviews, the inspiration of the song came when a fire broke loose in Robert Smith's home. After that day, Smith was going through the remains and came across his wallet which had pictures of his wife, Mary. The cover of the single is one of the pictures. The same picture was used as the cover of the "Charlotte Sometimes" single, but that image was heavily warped and distorted. In 2011, the song was voted #278 on Rolling Stone's "The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time" list.



                37. Vanilla Ice - Ice Ice Baby

                Retro Debut: week 37, 1990
                Retro Peak: #2
                Retro Chart run: 2 - 4 - 6 - 9 - 24 - 27 - 27 - 30 - 37 - 43 - 46 - 43 - 37 - 50 - 51 - 59 (16 weeks - pending 1991 run)
                Facts: It is a hip hop song written by American rapper Vanilla Ice, K. Kennedy, and DJ Earthquake. It was based on the bassline of "Under Pressure" by Queen and David Bowie, who did not receive songwriting credit or royalties until after it had become a hit. "Ice Ice Baby" was first released as the B-side to Vanilla Ice's cover of "Play That Funky Music", but the single was not initially successful. When disc jockey David Morales played "Ice Ice Baby" instead, it began to gain success. "Ice Ice Baby" was the first hip hop single to top the Billboard Hot 100. Outside the United States, the song topped the charts in Australia, Belgium, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Ireland and the United Kingdom, thus helping the song diversify hip hop by introducing it to a mainstream audience.



                36. Kirsty MacColl - Don't Come The Cowboy With Me, Sonny Jim

                Retro Debut: week 14, 1990
                Retro Peak: #15
                Retro Chart run: 21 - 20 - 23 - 29 - 25 - 27 - 26 - 31 - 30 - 33 - 28 - 20 - 23 - 28 - 26 - 23 - 19 - 15 - 24 - 22 - 23 - 22 - 19 - 27 - 29 - 28 - 29 - 34 - 31 - 36 (30 weeks)
                Facts: It is a song by British singer and songwriter Kirsty MacColl, released in 1990 as the fourth and final single from her second studio album Kite. It was written by MacColl and produced by Steve Lillywhite. The song reached No. 82 in the UK and remained in the charts for four weeks. Upon release, Robin Denselow of The Guardian described the song as "country-style", "emotional" and "personal", with "straight talking matched against [MacColl's] own lap steel guitar work".



                35. Inspiral Carpets - This Is How It Feels

                Retro Debut: week 12, 1990
                Retro Peak: #3
                Retro Chart run: 3 - 4 - 5 - 7 - 7 - 11 - 24 - 41 - 43 - 52 - 55 - 53 - 49 - 46 - 47 - 72 - 76 - 79 - 74 - 71 - 67 - 67 - 66 - 67 (24 weeks)
                Facts: It is a song by the Inspiral Carpets. Written by Clint Boon, it was their first single to enter the UK Top 40, where it peaked at #14. The second verse of this song was changed for the radio edit. The original lyrics for the first and third line were: "There's a funeral in the town" and "Seems they found him under a train" respectively. However, in the radio version, they are as follows: "Black car drives through the town" and "Left a note for a local girl." The edit was most likely made because the original version's lyrics were in reference to suicide.



                34. Guru Josh - Infinity

                Retro Debut: week 9, 1990
                Retro Peak: #9
                Retro Chart run: 9 - 19 - 35 - 36 - 45 - 52 - 43 - 44 - 23 - 26 - 23 - 35 - 23 - 15 - 13 - 40 - 41 - 28 - 27 - 25 - 19 - 15 - 16 - 22 - 24 - 28 - 25 - 28 - 33 - 21 (30 weeks)
                Facts: Also known as "Infinity (1990's... Time for the Guru)", is a song by British acid house musician Guru Josh. It was originally released in December 1989 as the lead single from his debut album of the same name. The song was re-released in 2008 in a remixed version called "Infinity 2008". It achieved success in many European countries, such as Spain, Germany, UK and Austria in 1989 and 1990, peaking at number five on the UK Singles Chart in March 1990, and has been featured on numerous dance compilations from 1990 to the present day.



                33. George Michael - Freedom '90

                Retro Debut: week 44, 1990
                Retro Peak: #1 (1 week)
                Retro Chart run: 1 - 2 - 2 - 5 - 11 - 9 - 23 - 17 - 24 (9 weeks - pending 1991 run)
                Facts: It is a song written, produced, and performed by George Michael, and released on Columbia Records in 1990. The "'90" added to the end of the title is to prevent confusion with a hit by Michael's former band Wham!, also titled "Freedom". The song's backing beat is a sample from James Brown's song "Funky Drummer". The song refers to Michael's past success with Wham!, yet also shows a new side of himself as a new man, who is more cynical about the music business than he had been before. Michael refused to appear in the video and allowed a group of supermodels to appear instead.



                32. Bette Midler - From A Distance

                Retro Debut: week 41, 1990
                Retro Peak: #2
                Retro Chart run: 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 8 - 9 - 14 - 21 - 19 - 26 - 29 - 35 (12 weeks - pending 1991 run)
                Facts: It is a song written in 1985 by American singer-songwriter Julie Gold. Gold was working as a secretary at the time for HBO and writing songs in her free time. Gold's friend, Christine Lavin, introduced the song to Nanci Griffith, who first recorded it for her 1987 album, Lone Star State of Mind. The song was covered a number of times, with the most successful being a version by Bette Midler which became a major hit in 1990. "From a Distance" reached number one on the Adult Contemporary chart and peaked at number two on the Billboard Hot 100 behind Stevie B's "Because I Love You (The Postman Song)". The song went on to win a Grammy for Song of the Year in 1991.



                31. Faith No More - Epic

                Retro Debut: week 7, 1990
                Retro Peak: #2
                Retro Chart run: 2 - 2 - 2 - 4 - 4 - 9 - 26 - 59 - 58 - 63 - 53 (11 weeks)
                Facts: The song was the band's breakthrough hit, peaking at number nine on the US Billboard Hot 100, number two in New Zealand, and number one in Australia for three weeks. It is among the band's most popular songs and a staple in their concerts. The video gained controversy due to a scene at the end where a fish is out of water and appears to be dying on camera. During an interview, the band joked that the fish seen flopping around in the music video belonged to Icelandic singer Björk, who at the time was the singer for the band The Sugarcubes, and they claimed to have stolen it from her at a party. There are also stories of Björk giving the fish to the keyboardist Roddy Bottum after a poetry reading in San Francisco. This was confirmed by the singer who defended the group, saying that "I know those guys, I know they wouldn't do anything to harm [him]. But I know, if I had gone home with MY fish, which was given to ME, none of this would have ever happened."
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                • #33
                  1990 Year-End Chart :: Part II



                  30. Snap! - The Power

                  Retro Debut: week 13, 1990
                  Retro Peak: #1 (1 week)
                  Retro Chart run: 1 - 2 - 5 - 5 - 6 - 16 - 20 - 46 - 32 - 31 - 34 - 63 - 67 - 64 - 66 - 56 - 53 - 58 (9 weeks)
                  Facts: It is a song by German Eurodance group Snap!. It was released in January 1990 as the lead single from their debut studio album, World Power. The song reached number-one in Greece, the Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and Zimbabwe, as well as on the US Billboard Hot Dance Club Play and Hot Rap charts. On the Billboard Hot 100, "The Power" managed to reach number 2 for one week, behind "Vision of Love" by Mariah Carey. In 2017, BuzzFeed listed the song at number 38 in their list of "The 101 Greatest Dance Songs of the '90s".



                  29. Paula Abdul - Opposites Attract

                  Retro Debut: week 1, 1990
                  Retro Peak: #2
                  Retro Chart run: 4 - 2 - 3 - 10 - 35 - 43 - 67 - 66 - OUT - RE:13 - 9 - 13 - 14 - 15 - 50 - 71 - 76 (16 weeks - pending 1989 run)
                  Facts: Lyrically, the song is about a couple who love each other despite being different in almost every way possible. The song's music video was directed by Candace Reckinger and Michael Patterson, in which Abdul dances with cartoon character MC Skat Kat, voiced by The Wild Pair, Bruce DeShazer and Marvin Gunn. The idea of MC Skat Kat came from the Gene Kelly film Anchors Aweigh, where Kelly dances with Jerry Mouse from the Tom and Jerry cartoon series. Paula even choreographed the animated character's moves to match her live-action dance moves in the video. MC Skat Kat was animated by members of the Disney animation team, working outside the studio between major projects, under the direction of Chris Bailey. The video won the 1991 Grammy Award for Best Short Form Music Video.



                  28. a-ha - Crying In The Rain

                  Retro Debut: week 42, 1990
                  Retro Peak: #1 (1 week)
                  Retro Chart run: 1 - 2 - 3 - 7 - 6 - 7 - 12 - 12 - 12 - 14 - 19 (11 weeks - pending 1991 run)
                  Facts: In 1989, the Norwegian pop band a-ha covered the song. It was the first single taken from their 1990 East of the Sun, West of the Moon album. Following its success, a-ha became closer to the Everly Brothers, who had originally recorded the song. The band members were presented a set of guitars by the Everly Brothers that a-ha continues to use. "Crying in the Rain" was a-ha's last single to go top 40 on a Billboard chart in the U.S. to date, peaking at #26 on the Billboard Adult Contemporary chart during the week ending April 6, 1991.



                  27. INXS - Suicide Blonde

                  Retro Debut: week 37, 1990
                  Retro Peak: #1 (1 week)
                  Retro Chart run: 5 - 1 - 4 - 7 - 8 - 14 - 16 - 18 - 41 - 38 - 49 - 55 - 70 - 34 - 36 - 38 (16 weeks - pending 1991 run)
                  Facts: It reached number two in Australia, number nine in the United States, and number 11 in the United Kingdom. The song was written by Michael Hutchence and Andrew Farriss of the group INXS, after the band had gotten back together after a year-long sabbatical in 1989. The song was named after a woman who had bleached her own hair because she had "dyed" by her own hand and who was "love devastation". Hutchence's then-girlfriend, Kylie Minogue, gave him the inspiration for the title while working on her 1989 film The Delinquents. Minogue was required to wear a platinum blonde wig for the role.



                  26. Maxi Priest - Close To You

                  Retro Debut: week 24, 1990
                  Retro Peak: #1 (1 week)
                  Retro Chart run: 2 - 1 - 2 - 2 - 4 - 7 - 23 - 32 - 29 - 31 - 43 - 46 - 37 - 26 - 12 - 19 - 28 - 36 - 53 (19 weeks)
                  Facts: It is a song by English reggae singer Maxi Priest. It was released in July 1990 as the lead single from his fifth album Bonafide (1990). "Close to You" reached number one on the US Billboard Hot 100 on 6 October 1990, peaked at number two on the Australian ARIA Singles Chart, and reached number seven on the UK Singles Chart. The song was also featured in the film Sleeping with the Enemy.



                  25. Primal Scream - Loaded

                  Retro Debut: week 10, 1990
                  Retro Peak: #2
                  Retro Chart run: 2 - 2 - 4 - 6 - 9 - 12 - 17 - 35 - 49 - 64 - 71 - 74 - 22 - 16 - 14 - 36 - 42 - 46 - 49 - 46 - 57 - 51 - 54 - 58 - OUT - RE:51 (25 weeks)
                  Facts: It is a song by Scottish rock band Primal Scream, released in February 1990 as the lead single from their third studio album Screamadelica (1991). Mixed and produced by Andrew Weatherall, it is a remix of an earlier song titled "I'm Losing More Than I'll Ever Have". In 2014, NME placed the song at number 59 in its list of the 500 Greatest Songs Of All Time. Muzik magazine listed the song as one of the 50 most influential dance records of all time, describing it as "unquestionably the finest indie dance record ever ... something akin to "Sympathy for the Devil" for the E generation".



                  24. Del Amitri - Nothing Ever Happens

                  Retro Debut: week 6, 1990
                  Retro Peak: #6
                  Retro Chart run: 17 - 12 - 10 - 8 - 8 - 6 - 11 - 13 - 17 - 15 - 13 - 13 - 30 - 20 - 32 - 38 - 35 - 42 - 40 - 46 - 70 - 66 - 70 - 69 - 56 - 62 - 56 - 50 - 46 - 49 (30 weeks)
                  Facts: Released as a single between late 1989 and early 1990, it reached #11 in the UK charts (it was the band's biggest hit in the UK), and was a top-10 hit in Ireland, peaking at #4. It is the last track on the album Waking Hours. The song was ranked at number 82 on a list of the 100 greatest songs of the 1990s by listeners of Absolute Radio.



                  23. Kylie Minogue - Better The Devil You Know

                  Retro Debut: week 20, 1990
                  Retro Peak: #5
                  Retro Chart run: 5 - 6 - 5 - 7 - 11 - 16 - 19 - 23 - 22 - 16 - 17 - 21 - 30 - 25 - 22 - 26 - 26 - 32 - 34 - 33 - 31 - 40 - 38 - 43 - 34 - 40 - 46 - 48 - 46 - 45 (30 weeks)
                  Facts: It is known as the song that re-invented Minogue with more sex appeal, as her previous albums were presented with her "girl next door" persona. Her music onwards presented a more independent approach. Lyrically, the song was said to be about Minogue's leaving of her TV series Neighbours and her relationship with her then-boyfriend, INXS frontman and singer Michael Hutchence. The song was lauded by music critics, who noted the imagery change in her music. They also complimented the song itself and felt it was one of Minogue's best - a highlight of not just her studio album but her compilations as well. The song has appeared in commercials, including Coca-Cola and the film If Looks Could Kill, and was later re-recorded in 2012 at the Abbey Road Studios for inclusion on Minogue's orchestral album The Abbey Road Sessions.



                  22. Belinda Carlisle - La Luna

                  Retro Debut: week 1, 1990
                  Retro Peak: #5
                  Retro Chart run: 5 - 7 - 8 - 19 - 19 - 16 - 19 - 18 - 19 - 21 - 22 - 23 - 21 - 19 - 19 - 30 - 22 - 21 - 29 - 41 - 53 - 52 - 55 - 57 - 49 - 52 - 60 (27 weeks - pending 1989 run)
                  Facts: It is the second single from Belinda Carlisle's third album Runaway Horses, released in 1989. The music video was directed by Andy Morahan. It features Carlisle lying naked in bed fantasizing about a night à la Cinderella.



                  21. George Michael - Praying For Time

                  Retro Debut: week 35, 1990
                  Retro Peak: #1 (2 weeks)
                  Retro Chart run: 1 - 1 - 4 - 5 - 9 - 10 - 20 - 24 - 25 - 41 - 45 - 53 - 57 (13 weeks)
                  Facts: It is a song written and performed by George Michael, released on Epic Records in the United Kingdom and Columbia Records in the United States in 1990. It spent one week at number one on the US Billboard Hot 100, making it Michael's seventh number one in the US and his last solo single to reach the top of the Hot 100. A dark and sombre reflection on social ills and injustice, it was hailed by critics, with James Hunter of Rolling Stone magazine describing the song as "a distraught look at the world's astounding woundedness. Michael offers the healing passage of time as the only balm for physical and emotional hunger, poverty, hypocrisy and hatred." While Michael refused to appear in videos to support the album, an experimental video clip directed by Michael Borofsky was released for "Praying for Time", featuring only the lyrics of the song with a blue and black background that, at the end of the clip, reveals itself to be the image on the cover of the album. Some of the written lyrics featured in the video are slightly animated. The video quickly became a buzz clip on MTV, and stayed in rotation on most video networks for weeks. Similarly, the commercial single had no cover photo, only words. Some have speculated that the style of the video was influenced by Prince's similar promo clip for "Sign o' the Times" released three years previously.
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                  • #34
                    1990 Year-End Chart :: Part III



                    20. Maria McKee - Show Me Heaven

                    Retro Debut: week 38, 1990
                    Retro Peak: #2
                    Retro Chart run: 2 - 2 - 2 - 7 - 8 - 12 - 11 - 14 - 17 - 16 - 17 - 18 - 24 - 25 - 31 (15 weeks - pending 1991 run)
                    Facts: It is a power ballad written by Maria McKee, Eric Rackin and Jay Rifkin, and recorded by McKee for the soundtrack to the Tom Cruise film Days of Thunder, released in June 1990. The song reached number one on the UK Singles Chart for four weeks and went on the become the sixth highest-selling single of 1990 in the UK. "Show Me Heaven" originated as "Secret Fire", a track written by Eric Rackin and Jay Rifkin for the soundtrack of Days of Thunder. When Geffen contacted McKee in the hope she would record the song, the singer dismissed the idea, but the label insisted they send her the demo tape for consideration. On hearing the demo, McKee felt the lyrics were "appalling". She told Simon Mayo in 1991: "I liked the melody but I said I'd only do it if I could change the lyrics."



                    19. Londonbeat - I've Been Thinking About You

                    Retro Debut: week 36, 1990
                    Retro Peak: #2
                    Retro Chart run: 2 - 3 - 7 - 11 - 12 - 15 - 17 - 13 - 15 - 16 - 20 - 23 - 24 - 24 - 32 - 41 - 42 (17 weeks - pending 1991 run)
                    Facts: It is a song by British-American band Londonbeat from their second studio album, In the Blood. Released in 1990 as the first single from the album, it became a major worldwide hit, reaching the number-one spot in more than 10 countries—including Australia, Canada, Germany and the United States—and peaking at number two on the UK Singles Chart. AllMusic editor Jim Smith described the song as a "soulful dance single" and added further that Londonbeat's "pleasant harmonies and pumping flow are undeniably catchy."



                    18. Roxette - Dangerous

                    Retro Debut: week 1, 1990
                    Retro Peak: #2
                    Retro Chart run: 3 - 3 - 2 - 7 - 18 - 18 - 24 - 23 - 36 - 38 - 39 - 38 - 37 - 43 - 32 - 36 - 19 - 35 - 49 - 47 - 75 - 65 - 80 - OUT - RE:33 - 42 - 48 - 57 - 52 - 64 - 62 - 71 - 69 (32 weeks)
                    Facts: Written by Per Gessle, the song was released as the fifth and final single from their second studio album Look Sharp! (1988). Gessle penned it just before Roxette's first tour in 1987. Released in May 1989, it was the group's third top 10 showing on the Billboard Hot 100, spending two weeks at number two in March 1990—kept off the top spot by Janet Jackson's "Escapade". The video for "Dangerous" was filmed during Roxette's concert at Borgholm Castle in Öland, Sweden, in July 1989. It is a mix of rehearsal and live performance footage from that show, and was directed by Doug Freel.



                    17. Adamski - Killer

                    Retro Debut: week 15, 1990
                    Retro Peak: #2
                    Retro Chart run: 2 - 2 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 7 - 10 - 9 - 17 - 33 - 28 - 40 - 51 - 66 - 63 (15 weeks)
                    Facts: Written by Adamski and Seal and produced by Adamski, "Killer" was Adamski's breakthrough single but is now more notable for featuring Seal as a vocalist. A major hit in the United Kingdom, it reached number one on the UK Singles Chart, spending four weeks at the top in May and June 1990. In total, the single sold over 400,000 copies in the UK, earning it a Gold certification from the British Phonographic Industry. The relationship between Adamski and Seal later soured due to their record company wanting to promote the record as solely being by Adamski, despite the fact that Seal had both written and sung on the track.



                    16. Janet Jackson - Black Cat

                    Retro Debut: week 37, 1990
                    Retro Peak: #1 (1 week)
                    Retro Chart run: 1 - 3 - 5 - 4 - 9 - 10 - 11 - 14 - 23 - 25 - 28 - 20 - 21 - 33 - 27 - 18 (16 weeks - pending 1991 run)
                    Facts: It was released as the sixth single from her fourth studio album, Janet Jackson's Rhythm Nation 1814 (1989). The song was written by Jackson, who produced it with Jellybean Johnson. In a departure from her standard of industrial-based dance-pop, "Black Cat" is a hard rock song with arena rock influences. Its lyrics speak of substance abuse and gang violence. It was the final song recorded for the album, after Jackson, along with Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis, composed its main riff when desiring a rock song to complete the record. "Black Cat" received a Grammy Award nomination for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance, making her the only artist in history to receive nominations spanning five genres.



                    15. EMF - Unbelievable

                    Retro Debut: week 45, 1990
                    Retro Peak: #1 (3 weeks)
                    Retro Chart run: 1 - 1 - 1 - 4 - 4 - 8 - 13 - 25 (8 weeks - pending 1991 run)
                    Facts: It is a song written by and recorded by British band EMF, originally appearing on their debut album, Schubert Dip. It was released as a single in the UK in 1990, peaking in the UK Singles Chart at number three on 1 December 1990. It was the 32nd-best-selling single of 1990 in the UK. In the United States, it hit number one on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1991. The song contains samples of US comedian Andrew Dice Clay throughout the track, including the loud exclamation of "oh!" at the start of each chorus along with the words "it's unbelievable" spoken during the bridge. Rolling Stone listed "Unbelievable" at number 12 in their "20 Biggest Songs of the Summer: The 1990s" list in July 2014.



                    14. AC/DC - Thunderstruck

                    Retro Debut: week 39, 1990
                    Retro Peak: #1 (2 weeks)
                    Retro Chart run: 1 - 1 - 3 - 9 - 9 - 17 - 22 - 30 - 10 - 8 - 6 - 9 - 9 - 8 (14 weeks - pending 1991 run)
                    Facts: is the lead single on the 1990 album The Razors Edge by Australian hard rock band AC/DC. In January 2018, as part of Triple M's "Ozzest 100", the 'most Australian' songs of all time, "Thunderstruck" was ranked number 8.



                    13. Jon Bon Jovi - Blaze of Glory

                    Retro Debut: week 30, 1990
                    Retro Peak: #1 (3 weeks)
                    Retro Chart run: 1 - 2 - 1 - 1 - 2 - 3 - 6 - 11 - 10 - 18 - 22 - 29 - 49 - 55 - 55 (15 weeks)
                    Facts: It is the debut solo single by Jon Bon Jovi which reached No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 and the Mainstream rock chart in 1990, his only chart-topper away from his band Bon Jovi. The power ballad was allegedly recorded by Jon Bon Jovi because Emilio Estevez requested Bon Jovi's song "Wanted Dead or Alive" for the soundtrack to Young Guns II, but Bon Jovi did not think the lyrics -- about the band constantly touring -- fit the theme of the Western movie. However, the request inspired him to write "Blaze of Glory" with lyrics more topical to the film.



                    12. Kaoma - Lambada

                    Retro Debut: week 1, 1990
                    Retro Peak: #2
                    Retro Chart run: 12 - 6 - 6 - 5 - 2 - 2 - 3 - 9 - 13 - 17 - 19 - 29 - 25 - 29 - 24 - 26 - 21 - 22 - 22 - 29 (20 weeks - pending 1989 run)
                    Facts: It is a song recorded by French-Brazilian pop group Kaoma. At the time of release, "Lambada" was regarded as the most successful European single in the history of CBS Records, with sales of 1.8 million copies in France and more than 4 million across Europe. It is one of the greatest-selling singles of all time, having sold more than 5 million copies worldwide. The lyrics and music of Kaoma's "Chorando Se Foi (Lambada)" were an unauthorized translation of the song "Llorando se fue", originally composed, performed and recorded by the Bolivian Andean pop group Los Kjarkas in 1981. The song's lyrics and music had been lawfully registered in 1985 by the founding members of Los Kjarkas – Gonzalo and Ulises Hermosa – in Germany's Music and Authors Society (GEMA), and the unauthorized copy by Kaoma led to a successful 1990 lawsuit by Los Kjarkas against Kaoma's producer Jean-Claude Bonaventure.



                    11. Roxette - It Must Have Been Love

                    Retro Debut: week 23, 1990
                    Retro Peak: #1 (2 weeks)
                    Retro Chart run: 10 - 3 - 2 - 1 - 1 - 2 - 2 - 5 - 4 - 5 - 7 - 10 - 12 - 15 - 25 - 31 - 39 - 42 - 59 - 61 - 66 - 70 (22 weeks)
                    Facts: It is a song written by Per Gessle and performed by the Swedish pop duo Roxette. The song was first released as "It Must Have Been Love (Christmas for the Broken Hearted)" in December 1987. It was composed after EMI Germany asked the duo to "come up with an intelligent Christmas single". It became a top five hit in Sweden, but was not released internationally. The original song was followed by the most successful incarnation, a slightly edited version, omitting the Christmas references, created for the soundtrack to the 1990 film Pretty Woman. The power ballad became the duo's third number one hit in the United States, and is one of their best selling releases, being certified gold or platinum in a number of countries.
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