UKMIX Top Canadian Artists | Year 1985 Review + #241-272

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Postby matthew_dixon » Thu Mar 08, 2018 10:00 am

Voted. What a wonderfully diverse list we had to pick from. It amazes me just how many Canadian acts there are that I know and love precisely one song from -- therefore a lot of my lower ranked tracks on my votes were pretty much one hit wonders for me.
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Postby trebor » Thu Mar 08, 2018 10:53 am

^ Thank you @Matthew! :D

//

LOG:
Duplicates removed:
Joran (2x) / Julie Doiron (Julie Doren) / Kon Kan (Kon-Kan) / Murray McLauchlan (Murray MacLauchlan)
Artist clarification:
Bond: Rock band from Toronto. JUNO 1976 awards nominee: Most Promising New Act [ :lol: ] (Turned out to be a one-hit wonder]

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Postby cheapthrills » Thu Mar 08, 2018 4:17 pm

I will be voting. :)
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Postby trebor » Thu Mar 08, 2018 6:55 pm

^^ Great! :D
Looking very forward to your vote!
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Postby trebor » Thu Mar 08, 2018 10:02 pm

Image 1963

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Bobby Curtola: "Destination Love"
Bobby Curtola: "Indian Giver"
Bobby Curtola: "Move Over"

Bobby Curtola: "Three Rows Over"



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Hank Snow: ""Ninety Miles An Hour (Down A Dead End Street)"

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Paul Anka: "Hello Jim"
Paul Anka: "Love (Makes the World Go ‘Round)"
Paul Anka: "Remember Diana"

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Richie Knight & The Mid-Knights: "Charlena"

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Courtesy: Discogs.com
US-American vocalist born circa 1940 in Nashville, Tennessee. Shane relocated to Canada where she linked up with Frank Motley and worked in both the Toronto and Montreal club scenes. Shane was, atypical for the era, a transgender woman.
Although technically not Canadian, Jackie Shane scored a sizeable hit at CHUM Toronto and Greater Toronto, in general, with the song "Any Other Way". Probably (one of) the first openly transgender women charting in Canada!
The vast majority of sources link her to Canada and CBC produced a documentary about her life; so there is enough ties to Canada to feature her here!

Jackie Shane: "Any Other Way"
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Postby trebor » Thu Mar 08, 2018 10:34 pm

From now on all chart data used will come from R.P.M. Magazine which was launched in February 1964 and presented a pan-Canadian perspective on music.

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RPM Music Weekly
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Postby trebor » Sat Mar 10, 2018 12:24 am

Two sets of votes received! :D
31 days to go! Keep them coming!

//

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Postby Wayne » Sat Mar 10, 2018 10:04 am

I did not know that song was by a transgender woman! :o Never heard of Jackie Shane before.

Any Other Way is such a typical 60s song, you can't help but love it.
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Postby trebor » Sat Mar 10, 2018 11:52 am

@Wayne: Thank you very much for stopping by and commenting. :D
Jackie Shane: Had no idea, either! When I read the short bio on discogs.com I had to verify multiple sources for confirmation. Canada is (and was) a really forward thinking nation.
Agree, that the song sounds very crisp and fresh and the production is beyond excellent. There are quite some live / TV show cuts on YouTube.

//

Was actually expecting you to comment on Brett Kissel's renditon of "O Canada / Ô Canada" compared to Céline's... 8-) [ <3 ]
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Postby trebor » Sat Mar 10, 2018 11:52 am

Image 1965

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Big Town Boys: "It Was I" [# 5]
Tommy Graham And The Big Town Boys: "Put You Down" [# 14]

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Bobby Curtola. "Alone And Lonely" [# 11]
Bobby Curtola: "Forget Her" [# 10]
Bobby Curtola. "It's About Time" [# 9]
Bobby Curtola: "Makin' Love" [# 2]
Bobby Curtola: "Mean Woman Blues" [# 3]
Bobby Curtola: "Walkin(') With My Angel" [# 3]

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David Clayton Thomas: "Out Of The Sunshine" [# 31]
David Clayton Thomas (And His Quintet): "Walk That Walk" [# 3]

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Dee And The Yeomen: "Take The First Train Home" [# 10]

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Gordon Lightfoot: "I'm Not Sayin'" [#12]
Gordon Lightfoot: "Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues" [# 3]

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Jack London (And The Sparrows): "If You Don't Want My Love" [# 3]
Jack London (And The Sparrows): "I'll Be The Boy" [# 19]
Jack London (And The Sparrows): "Our Love Is Passed" [# 7]

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Johnny (Stevens) And The Canadians: "A Million Tears Ago" [# 9]

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Little Caesar (And The Consuls): "(My Girl Sloopy" [# 3]
Little Caesar (And The Consuls): "You('ve) Really Got A Hold On Me" [# 1]

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Terry Black: "Little Liar" [# 10]
Terry Black: "Only Sixteen" [# 14]
Terry Black: "Poor Little Fool" [# 6]
Terry Black: "Say It Again" [# 24]

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The Esquires: "Cry Is All I Do" [# 39]
The Esquires: "Love's Made A Fool Of You" [# 19]
The Esquires: "So Many Other Boys" [# 9]

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The Guess Who (As: Chad Allan And The Expressions [Guess Who ?]: "Hey Ho What You Do To Me" [# 3]
The Guess Who (As: Guess Who?): "Till We Kissed" [# 36]
The Guess Who (As: Chad Allan And The Expressions [Guess Who ?]:Tossin' And Turnin'" [# 3]

The Guess Who (As: Chad Allan And The Expressions [Guess Who ?]: "Shakin' All Over" [# 1]



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Wes Dakus: "Hobo" [# 9]

A total of 12 domestic acts made it into the Top 10 with The Butterfingers: "Baby Ruth" and The Great Scots: "Give Me Lovin'" stalling at #11.

There were only 2 home-grown Number One hits, courtesy of "The Guess Who" and "Little Caesar And The Consuls".
Bobby Curtola was the definitive teen heart-throb juggernaut with six songs going Top 11 and three of them Top 3 (most of the year tied with "The Guess Who").

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Special mention goes to Quebec and Michel Louvain: "C'Est Un Secret (Aloha Oe)" who went as far as # 14. (Unfortunately, there is no audio available).
Last edited by trebor on Sun Mar 11, 2018 9:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby trebor » Sun Mar 11, 2018 3:21 pm

Image 1966

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Barry Allen: "Lovedrops" [# 10]
Barry Allen: "Turn Her Down" [# 22]

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Bobby Curtola: "Real Thing" [# 15]
Bobby Curtola: "Wildwood Days" [# 16]

Bobby Curtola: "While I'm Away" [# 4]



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Bobby Kris (And The Imperials): "Walk On By" [# 8]

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Gordon Lightfoot: "Spin, Spin" [# 7]

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Little Caesar (And The Consuls): "Mercy Mr. Percy" [# 38]
Little Caesar (And The Consuls): "You Laugh Too Much" [# 9]

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Race Marbles: "Like A Dribbling Fram" [# 6]

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Robbie Lane (& The Disciples): "What Am I Gonna Do" [# 10]

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The Big Town Boys: "Hey Girl Go It Alone" [# 7]

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The Carlton Showband (With Arlene King): "The Merry Ploughboy" [# 4]

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The Guess Who: "And She's Mine" [# 32]
The Guess Who: "Believe Me" [# 10]
The Guess Who: "Clock On The Wall" [# 16]
The Guess Who: "Hurting Each Other" [# 19]

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Wes Dakus: "The Hoochi Coochi Coo" [# 4]

11 Canadian artists made the Top 10 this year and nobody peaked higher than #4 this being Bobby Curtola, The Carlton Showband (With Arlene King), and Wes Dakus.
David Clayton Thomas (& The Bossmen): "Brain Washed" peaked at #11 and Ray Hutchinson: "Rose Marie" got to #12.
The Guess Who was the only act to chart 4 songs (Technically, Bobby Curtola did so too but one single will be accounted to 1967).

Quebec spotlight:
According to the radio chart from CJSM Montreal from April 4, 1966 the most popular French song that week was Les Gendarmes: "Ne Me Quitte Pas".
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Postby trebor » Sun Mar 11, 2018 5:38 pm

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Canada Centennial

Wikipedia
The Canadian Centennial was a yearlong celebration held in 1967 when Canada celebrated the 100th anniversary of the Canadian Confederation. Celebrations occurred throughout the year but culminated on Dominion Day, July 1, 1967. Coins were different from other years' issues, with animals on each — the cent, for instance, had a dove on its reverse. Communities and organizations across Canada were encouraged to engage in Centennial projects to celebrate the anniversary. The projects ranged from special one-time events to local improvement projects, such as the construction of municipal arenas and parks. The Centennial Flame was also added to Parliament Hill. A Centennial Train traversed the country and school children across the country were able to see exhibits raising their consciousness as to Canadian history and nationalism and enlivening their enthusiasm to visit Expo. Children born in 1967 were declared Centennial babies.
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Expo 67

Wikiepdia
The 1967 International and Universal Exposition or Expo 67, as it was commonly known, was a general exhibition, Category One World's Fair held in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, from April 27 to October 29, 1967. It is considered to be the most successful World's Fair of the 20th century with the most attendees to that date and 62 nations participating. It also set the single-day attendance record for a world's fair, with 569,500 visitors on its third day.

Expo 67 was Canada's main celebration during its centennial year. The fair had been intended to be held in Moscow, to help the Soviet Union celebrate the Russian Revolution's 50th anniversary; however, for various reasons, the Soviets decided to cancel, and Canada was awarded it in late 1962.

The project was not well supported in Canada at first. It took the determination of Montreal's mayor, Jean Drapeau, and a new team of managers to guide it past political, physical and temporal hurdles. Defying a computer analysis that said it could not be done, the fair opened on time.

After Expo 67 ended in October 1967, the site and most of the pavilions continued on as an exhibition called Man and His World, open during the summer months from 1968 until 1984. By that time, most of the buildings—which had not been designed to last beyond the original exhibition—had deteriorated and were dismantled. Today, the islands that hosted the world exhibition are mainly used as parkland and for recreational use, with only a few remaining structures from Expo 67 to show that the event was held there.
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Postby trebor » Sun Mar 11, 2018 7:06 pm

Image 1967

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Gordon Lightfoot: "Go Go Round" [# 27]
Gordon Lightfoot: "The Way I Feel" [# 36]

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The Collectors: "Fisherwoman" [# 18]
The Collectors: "Looking At A Baby" [# 23]

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The Guess Who: "Flying On The Ground Is Wrong" [# 36]
The Guess Who: "His Girl" [# 19]
The Guess Who: "This Time Long Ago" [# 30]

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The Jon-Lee Grop: "Bring It Down Front" # 23

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The Paupers: "If I Call You By Some Name" [# 31]
The Paupers: "Simple Deed" [# 21]

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The Staccatos: "Catch The Love Parade" [# 28]
The Staccatos: "Half Past Midnight" [# 8]

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The Stitch In Tyme: "Got To Get You Into My Life" [# 36]
The Stitch In Tyme: "New Dawn" [# 36]

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The Ugly Ducklings: "Gaslight"[#17]

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Tom Northcott: "Sunny Goodge Street" [# 20]

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Young Canada Singers [Les Jeunes Chanteurs Du Canada): "Canada (A Centennial Song: 1867-1967) (Une Chanson Du Centenaire 1867-1967)" [# 1]



Abysmal chart year for Canadian artists as a mere 27 songs made the Top 40, with 6 songs barely charting into the Top 20, and a miserably low tally of TWO went Top 10 with the Canadian Centennial celebratory hymn making it to number one; and it's the only Canadian song in the 1967 year end chart at #41 (despite, allegedly, selling over 250,000 copies).
Incidentally, the chart for Canada Day on July 1, 1967 marked the first ever Canadian chart without having any domestic content!

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Quebec spotlight:
According to CJSM Montreal, Georges Dor: "La Manic" was the most popular Quebecois song on March 27, 1967. (chart week chosen randomly)
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Postby cheapthrills » Tue Mar 13, 2018 1:28 pm

So there were pretty much no women in Canada in the 60s.
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Postby trebor » Tue Mar 13, 2018 5:53 pm

^^
Didn't really occur to me until you mentioned it! :o
You raised a very good point. Time permitting, I will go through the lower ranks of the Top 40's and do a summary on female Canadian voices, eventually.
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Postby trebor » Tue Mar 13, 2018 6:08 pm

CRTC 1968 - Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission
MAPL/CanCon

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Wikipedia
The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC, French: Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes) is a public organisation in Canada with mandate as a regulatory agency for broadcasting and telecommunications. It was created in 1976 when it took over responsibility for regulating telecommunication carriers. Prior to 1976, it was known as the Canadian Radio and Television Commission, which was established in 1968 by the Parliament of Canada to replace the Board of Broadcast Governors. Its headquarters is located in the Central Building (Édifice central) of Les Terrasses de la Chaudière in Gatineau, Quebec.
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Wikipedia

Canadian content (CanCon, cancon or can-con) refers to the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) requirements, derived from the Broadcasting Act of Canada, that radio and television broadcasters (including cable and satellite specialty channels) must air a certain percentage of content that was at least partly written, produced, presented, or otherwise contributed to by persons from Canada. It also refers to that content itself, and, more generally, to cultural and creative content that is Canadian in nature.

The loss of the protective Canadian content quota requirements is one of the concerns of those opposed to the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Canada entered into the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a multilateral free trade agreement, in October 2012

How the MAPL system works
To qualify as Canadian content a musical selection must generally fulfill at least two of the following conditions:

M (music) — the music is composed entirely by a Canadian
A (artist) — the music is, or the lyrics are, performed principally by a Canadian
P (performance) — the musical selection consists of a performance that is:
Recorded wholly in Canada, or
Performed wholly in Canada and broadcast live in Canada.
L (lyrics) — the lyrics are written entirely by a Canadian
What constitutes a Canadian under the MAPL system

The CRTC states that for the purposes of the MAPL system, a Canadian can be defined by one of the following:

Canadian citizen
Permanent resident as defined by the 1976 Immigration Act
Person whose ordinary place of residence was Canada for the six months immediately preceding their contribution to a musical composition, performance or concert
Licensee, i.e., a person licensed to operate a radio station
TRIVIA

This last criterion was added in 1991, to accommodate Bryan Adams' album Waking Up the Neighbours, which, unusually, did not meet the Cancon standard despite every track being co-written and performed by a Canadian artist.

Adams had recorded the album mainly in England, and although some recording work was done in Canada, no track on the album qualified for the P in MAPL. Adams had also collaborated on the writing of the album with South African record producer Robert John "Mutt" Lange in London, England, with Adams and Lange both being credited as co-writers of both words and music on every cut on the album. As a result, no song on the album featured either music or lyrics entirely written by a Canadian, and therefore none of the album's songs qualified for the M or L in MAPL. All this meant that no track on the album qualified as Canadian content under the existing rules—although if Adams and Lange had simply agreed to credit one party with 100% of the music and the other with 100% of the lyrics, all the Adams/Lange collaborations would have counted as CanCon (as they were recorded by a Canadian artist).

After extensive controversy in the summer of that year, the CRTC changed the rules to allow for such collaborations, wherein a Canadian can work with a non-Canadian on both music and lyrics, provided the Canadian receives at least half of the credit for both music and lyrics. This gives the recorded track 1 point out of a possible 2 for the M and L sections of the MAPL criteria; to qualify as Cancon, the finished recording must also meet the criterion for either artist (A) or production (P).

Other Canadian artists with long-time international careers, like Anne Murray, Celine Dion, Avril Lavigne, and Shania Twain, have used recording studios in Canada specifically to maintain Cancon status
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Postby trebor » Tue Mar 13, 2018 7:20 pm

A Star Is Born

Céline Marie Claudette Dion was born on March 30, 1968!

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Including the Quebecois lists, she will be charting in each and every year starting in 1981 up to the present day!
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Postby trebor » Tue Mar 13, 2018 8:25 pm

Image 1968

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Andy Kim: "How'd We Ever Get This Way" [# 9]
Andy Kim: "Shoot 'Em Up Baby" [# 29]

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Steppenwolf: "Macgic Carpe Ride" [# 1]

Steppenwolf: "Born To Be Wild" [# 1]



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The Irish Rovers: "(The Puppet Song) Whiskey On A Sunday" [# 34]
The Irish Rovers: "The Unicorn" [# 4]

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The Stampeders: "Morning Magic" [# 23]

In 1968 Canadian content faced even stronger challenges as only 7 songs shared by FOUR artists managed to get into the Top 40. Four songs went Top 10 with Steppenwolf claiming both of the two number one hits; "Born To Be Wild" being the biggest Canadian hit ending up at #14 in the 1968 year end list.

Quebec Spotlight:

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According to CJSM Montreal, Stèphane (Robert): "Quand Tu Liras Cette Lettre" was the number one French-Canadian song on April 15, 1968.
(Chart week chosen randomly amongst available radio surveys. It's a pity that only some of the American countdowns (Palmarès Américain) from CFOX Pointe Claire and CJTR Trois Rivières exist (and nobody seems to care to salvage the French and French-Canadian lists).
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Postby trebor » Thu Mar 15, 2018 7:12 pm

Image 1969

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49th Parallel: "Now That I'm A Man" [# 30]

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Andy Kim: "So Good Together" [# 15]

Andy Kim: "Baby I Love You" [# 1]



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Buckstone Hardware: "Pack It In" [# 33]

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Life: "Hands Of The Clock" [# 19]

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Motherlode: "Memories Of A Broken Promise" [# 40]
Motherlode: "When I Die" [# 1]

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Paul Anka: "Goodnight My Love" [# 23]

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Steppenwolf: "It's Never Too Late" [# 33]
Steppenwolf: "Rock Me" [# 4]
Steppenwolf: "Move Over" [# 12]

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Sugar And Spice: "Cruel War" [# 31]

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The Guess Who: "Laughing" [# 1]
The Guess Who: "These Eyes" [# 7]
The Guess Who: "Undun"¨[# 21]

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The Poppy Family (Featuring Susan Jacks): "Which Way You Goin' Billy?" [# 9]

In 1969 only 20 domestic songs managed to get into the Top 40 (two of them peaking at #40) and only three peaked in the Top 20. Six songs did go Top 10 and three of them claimed the #1 spot: Andy Kim (Baby I Love You), Mohterlode (When I Die), and The Guess Who (Laughing). All these six songs made the 1969 Year End List with Andy Kim having the biggest Canadian hit at #11,
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Postby cheapthrills » Thu Mar 15, 2018 7:18 pm

Interesting. I know Canada has (or at least one point did have) some laws that require greater Canadian representation on the radio. I wonder when that started.
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