33 1/3 - playlist for: Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds

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Postby ShayLaB » Thu Sep 29, 2011 1:28 pm

Hello.

I am going to focus an individual act/artist and generate a playlist of their best songs. I intend to go through each of their albums and pick out the best tracks. At the end there should be a collection of tracks that span their career and showcase the highlights.

I'll will primarily be looking at the discography of acts that I either know nothing of, or have liked the little I have heard. Above all, I intend for this to be a little voyage of discovery for myself.

Playlists:
ABBA
Queen
Scott Walker
Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds
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Postby ShayLaB » Thu Sep 29, 2011 1:29 pm

Compiled when creating a list to be submitted to the ukmix Ultimate Chart for ABBA.

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Ring Ring
Ring Ring
People need love
Nina pretty ballerina
Love isn't easy (but it sure is hard enough)
He is your brother
She's my kind of girl
Rock 'n' roll band
Santa Rosa


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Waterloo
Waterloo
Sitting in the Palmtree
Dance (while the music still goes on)
Honey Honey
Watch out


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ABBA:
Mamma Mia
SOS
Man In The Middle
Bang A Boomerang
I Do I Do I Do I Do I Do
So Long


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Arrival
When I Kissed The Teacher
Knowing Me, Knowing You
Money, Money, Money
Tiger
Fernando

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The Album
Eagle
Take A Chance On Me
The Name Of The Game
Hole In Your Soul

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Voulez-Vous
As Good As New
Voulez-Vous
Does Your Mother Know
Chiquitita
Kisses Of Fire
Summer Night City
Gimme! Gimme! Gimme! (A Man After Midnight)

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Super Trooper
Super Trouper
The Winner Takes It All
On And On And On
Me And I

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The Visitors
Visitors
Head over heels
Soldiers
Two for the price of one
Slipping through my fingers
Like an angel passing through my room
Should I laugh or cry
Day before you came
Cassandra
Under attack
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Postby ShayLaB » Thu Sep 29, 2011 1:29 pm

Compiled when creating a list to be submitted to the ukmix Ultimate Chart for Queen.

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Queen
Keep Yourself Alive
Great King Rat
My Fairk King
Liar
Seven Seas of Rhye

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Queen 2

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Sheer Heart Attack
Brighton Rock
Killer Queen
Stone Cold Crazy

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A Night at the Opera
Death on Two Legs
39
Lazing on a Sunday Afternoon
The Prophets Song
Sweet Lady
Bohemian Rhapsody

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A Day at the Races
Tie Your Mother Down
Somebody to Love
The Millionaire Waltz
Good Old Fashioned Lover Boy

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News of the World
We Will Rock You
We Are the Champions
It's Late
Spread Your Wings
Now I'm Here

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Jazz
Fat Bottomed Girls
Bicycle Race
Jealousy
Don't Stop Me Now

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The Game
Dragon Attach
Another One Bites the Dust
Crazy Little Thing Called Love
Sail Away Sweet Sister
Play The Game
Save Me

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Flash Gordon
Flash

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Hot Space
Body Language
Calling All Girls
Under Pressure

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The Works
I Want To Break Free
Radio Ga Ga
Hammer to Fall
I Want it All
Tear it Up

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A Kind of Magic
One Vision
A Kind of Magic

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The Miracle
Breakthru
The Invisible Man
Scandal

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Innuendo
Innuendo
Headlong

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Made in Heaven
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Postby ShayLaB » Thu Sep 29, 2011 1:30 pm

** reserved **
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Postby ShayLaB » Thu Sep 29, 2011 1:40 pm

Artist:Scott Walker
Album:Scott
Released:1967

Image

Wiki Notes:
Scott was released only six months after Walker's third album with The Walker Brothers, Images. Its mixture of Walker's original compositions and selection of cover versions established Walker as a more serious and sombre artist, gone were the Beat group and Blue-eyed soul material of his former group. The choice of material generally fell into four main categories, his own work ("Montague Terrace (In Blue)", "Such a Small Love", "Always Coming Back to You"), contemporary covers ("The Lady Came from Baltimore", "Angelica"), movie songs ("You're Gonna Hear From Me", "Through a Long and Sleepless Night") and significantly, English-translated versions of the songs of the Belgian musician and songwriter Jacques Brel ("Mathilde", "My Death", "Amsterdam"). Brel was a major influence on Walker's own compositions, and Walker included Brel material on his first three solo albums. Walker described Brel without qualification as 'the most significant singer-songwriter in the world'. The real coup for Walker was his luck in acquiring and recording the new Mort Shuman-translated versions of Brel's material before anyone else.

Added to the Playlist:
Mathilde
Montague Terrace (in blue)
Such a Small Love
Amsterdam
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Postby ShayLaB » Sat Oct 01, 2011 5:57 pm

Artist:Scott Walker
Album:Scott 2
Released:1968

Image

Hmmm...Scott 2 may have reached #1 in the UK album charts but it is not as strong as it's predecessor. There are too many songs slipping towards MOR and the tunes are not are memorable. Patchy.

Wiki Notes:
Scott 2 follows the formula of Walker's début release, with a mixture of contemporary covers ("Black Sheep Boy", "The Windows of the World") Jacques Brel interpretations ("Jackie", "Next", "The Girls and the Dogs"), film songs ("Wait Until Dark", "Come Next Spring") and his own original compositions ("The Amorous Humphrey Plugg", "The Girls from the Streets", "Plastic Palace People", "The Bridge"). The content of his own and Brel's material was markedly more risqué than on Scott, with "Jackie", "Next" and "The Girls from the Streets" standing out with themes of sexual tribulations and decadent lifestyles.


Added to the Playlist:
Jackie
Next
The Girls from the Streets
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Postby ShayLaB » Sat Oct 01, 2011 6:14 pm

Artist:Scott Walker
Album:Scott 3
Released:1969

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Disappointing. Scott 2 was a disappointment...Scott 3 was a struggle. Lyrics to the fore...tunes as an afterthought. Starting to think his reputation is based on classic songs rather than classic albums. This makes a Scott Walker playlist a good idea but an effort to create.

Wiki Notes:
Upon release in 1969, it met with slower sales than his previous albums, as pop audiences struggled to keep pace with Walker's increasingly experimental approach. The dense lush string arrangements by Wally Stott seemed to evoke a Vegas-style lounge crooner atmosphere, but one tinted with surreal drones and touches of dissonance.


Added to the Playlist:
We Came Through
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Postby ShayLaB » Sun Oct 02, 2011 9:05 pm

Artist:Scott Walker
Album:Scott 4
Released:1969

Image

Wow...now this is more like it.

I have had a copy of this album for years but it was only in the last day or two that I started listening to every track carefully. I have to say that Scott 4 is simply stunning...I seriously considered all ten tracks to the playlist. If I ever do another album chart this will be going in at the upper echelons.


Wiki Notes:
It was originally released in late 1969 under his birth name, Noel Scott Engel (The name Walker did not appear on the original album sleeve), and was the first Walker album to consist solely of self-penned songs.


Added to the Playlist:
The Seventh Seal
The World's Strongest Man
Angels of Ashes
Hero of the War
The Old Man`s Back Again
Get Behind Me
Duchess
Rhymes of Goodbye
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Postby Marius » Sun Oct 02, 2011 9:28 pm

I only know one SW song ( :oops: ) so will make sure I check out a few of the above...
I want to marry all 3 Serebro chicks
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Postby ShayLaB » Sun Oct 02, 2011 11:17 pm

Hmmm...now this is awkward.

Scott made a string of remarkably average albums in the 70s that seem to be strangely difficult to get hold of. They appear to be out of print and are not available on Spotify or any other 'sources'.

Reading some of the reviews perhaps that is just as well.


==========================================

EDIT:
I was watching a documentary called 30th Century Man that spanned his entire career. In it he describes these describes the early 70's as his 'lost years' and refers to some of the albums as 'complete shlock'. He has refused to allow the albums to be released on CD and on mp3; presumably this means they will never be available again. Perhaps it is for the best.


==========================================


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1970 - Til the Band Comes In

Allmusic:
The 1990s rediscovery of Scott Walker, hitherto the Pop Star Who Time Forgot, was one of the most gratifying events of the mid-'90s. No man blessed with a voice like that, taste like that, talent like that, should ever have been consigned to the creaky oblivion of oldies radio.

But one needs to tread carefully when plunging into the cult. Even at his best, and particularly at his most recent, Walker can be an excruciatingly difficult taste to acquire.

Move into the early-'70s midpoint of his output, and oftentimes it's simply painful. Never regarded among Scott Walker's finest efforts and a resounding flop when it first appeared in 1971, 'Til the Band Comes In is, retrospectively, the most shocking of all the singer's early albums. His first four, after all, are dramatic slabs of MOR-noir, crucial experiences for anybody eager to discover Brel, Bergman, and a taste for truly surreal pop tones; by their standards alone, surely album number five should have traveled even further astray? It doesn't.

A year earlier, the BBC gave Walker his own TV series, with the assurance that he would concentrate his tonsils on ballads and standards. He fulfilled the brief admirably, and released a soundtrack album to prove it. Unfortunately, 'Til the Band Comes In suggests he never got the saccharine out of his system.

Til the Band Comes In is best left waiting at the stage door. Some "lost classics" were lost with good reason.
===================================================

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1972 - The Moviegoer

Allmusic:

Following the disappointing performance of Til the Band Comes In, Scott Walker returned to middle-of-the-road pop with The Moviegoer. Walker essentially created a harmless mainstream pop album and delivered it without much care. The record did boast some nice arrangements by Johnny Franz, but the music was seldom noteworthy.
===================================================

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1973 - Stretch

Allmusic:

Walker sounds more committed on this record, singing with a greater passion than on any record since Til the Band Comes In, but that still doesn't save Stretch from being anything more than a curiosity for dedicated fans.
===================================================

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1973 - Any Day Now

Allmusic:

On Any Day Now, Scott Walker tackles some real garbage material and spins what little gold he can from overwrought arrangements of sub-standard cover material.

There is not one original composition on display on Any Day Now, and for an artist who is responsible for absolute masterpieces like Scott 2 and Scott 4 to turn in an album of material this lackluster shows both the cruel machinations of the record industry and true contempt for one's fans. For when you come down to it, this album practically screams "contractual obligation." This is lazy music that aims to satisfy only the lowest common denominator.
===================================================

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1974 - We Had It All

Allmusic:

We Had It All follows the same pattern as the previous Stretch, but it leans a little more heavily toward country, as the centerpiece of four Billy Joe Shaver songs indicates. Although the album is still a little musically tentative, and while it is a disappointment to hear no new original material from Walker, We Had It All is his strongest record in years, since the country leanings are a welcome change of pace and he sings with authority throughout the record.
===================================================

It doesn't sound like being out of print is any great loss. There is a box set retrospective compilation released a few years ago called 5 Easy Pieces...if there was anything worth having on these five albums imagine they will turn up there.
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Postby ShayLaB » Sun Oct 02, 2011 11:24 pm

potojr wrote:I only know one SW song ( :oops: ) so will make sure I check out a few of the above...
To be honest there is a lot of rather dull MOR cabaret style crooning on Scott 2 and Scott 3 whilst the missing albums seem to be mainly sub-par C&W. Hopefully the track you know doesn't fall into either of these groups.

The best track so far is probably The Old Man's Back again.
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Postby ShayLaB » Tue Oct 04, 2011 9:17 pm

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Nite Flights - 1978

My original intention had been to focus on Scott Walker's solo material and ignore his outings with The Walker Brothers (none of them were actually called Walker and they weren't brothers). Most of their material on their various albums were cover versions and what I had heard sounded fine but not inspiring.

The one nagging doubt I had about this plan (and the track the actually spawned this thread) was the title track from their 1978 album , Nite Flights. It seemed so out of place from their normal fare that recently I started listening to the rest of the album.

In reality Nite Flights appears to be 3 EPs, one for each of the 'Brothers', patched together to make a whole. The four tracks credited to Scott Walker represent a complete break with the music of his past and serve as a re-alignment towards the more avant-garde output he would produce in the future. All four are excellent and are therefore added to the playlist. When I have finished with the solo material I will make a quick tour of the band's output in case there are a few other hidden gems.


Snippets from Allmusic review

Every once in a while, an album comes along that doesn't simply surprise you, it takes you down an alleyway, rips off all your clothes, then hares away with your socks on its head, singing selections from South Pacific. And just before it disappears from view, you notice that David Bowie, Iggy Pop, and Brian Eno are cavorting alongside it, sharing the spoils and plotting further misdeeds.

But whereas John was still locked into the art country balladeering which had always been his forte, and Gary was having trouble completing his allotment, Scott had finally realized that he had more to offer than another Kris Kristofferson outtake. As a writer, he had been all but silent since the late 1960s, when his peculiarly twisted post-pop visions sent solo album after solo album hurtling into a commercial void. Now, however, he was reaching back into that abyss, and emerged with four songs -- "Niteflights," "The Electrician," "Shut Out," and "Fat Mama Kick" -- which not only realigned his entire future career, they also twisted the on-going landscape of rock music itself.

In a perfect world, Scott would have completed the entire album himself, or at least been given an EP to himself. But of course that was not to be, and so Nite Flights appeared with the rest of the boys, the rest of the baggage, and, though both John and Gary at least tried to keep up with their bandmate, their failure was as painful as it was inevitable. Gary's "Death of Romance" and John's "Disciples of Death" are at least vindicated by their titles, but the songs are as thin as their composers voices and could be outtakes from another album entirely. They're certainly from another planet.
Added to the playlist:
Nite Flights
The Electrician
Shut Out
Fat Mama Kick
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Postby ShayLaB » Thu Oct 06, 2011 12:25 am

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1984 - Climate of Hunter

It's not a great album but it has a couple of super tracks. This is the transition album to the 'out-there' releases that were to follow.

From allmusic:

Walker's only album of the 1980s was both a blow for artistic credibility, and a blow against most of his old fans. The voice of the balladeer was still intact, and still even crooned sometimes. But the arrangements backed brow-furrowing, obtuse lyrics with '80s-oriented rock that incorporated some quasi-classical structures. Walker was seemingly more interested in painting abstracts in which the textures counted more than the content.

Yet it was not half as radical as the avant-garde direction he would stake out with his next album ten years later, Tilt.
Added to playlist:
Track 3
Track 5
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Postby ShayLaB » Thu Oct 06, 2011 12:34 am

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1995 - Tilt

If you want challenging, unconventional music then you have come to the right place. Bleak, completely detached and stunningly unique. Farmer in the City is simply brilliant.

From Allmusic:
Tilt was Scott Walker's first album following over a decade of silence, and whatever else he may have done during his exile, brightening his musical horizon was not on the agenda. Indescribably barren and unutterably bleak, Tilt is the wind that buffets the gothic cathedrals of everyone's favorite nightmares.

Tilt is not an easy album to love; it's not even that easy to listen to. First impressions place it on a plateau somewhere between Nico's Marble Index and Lou Reed's Metal Machine Music -- before long, familiarity and the elitist chattering of so many well-heeled admirers rendered both albums mere forerunners to some future shift in mainstream taste. And maybe that is the fate awaiting Tilt, although one does wonder precisely what monsters could rise from soil so belligerently barren. Even Metal Machine Music could be whistled, after all.
Added to playlist:
Farmer in the City
The Cockfighter
Tilt
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Postby ShayLaB » Thu Oct 06, 2011 10:40 pm

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Pola x (soundtrack) - 1999

The soundtrack to this little known French movie isn't a Scott Walker album as it features contributions from some other acts. Most of the tracks are instrumental and perhaps work well in the context of the movie. The best Scott Walker contribution is probably the string laden instrumental 'Light'.

From Allmusic:

This soundtrack is largely made up of compositions by Scott Walker, which the icon made in the vein of his astonishing 1995 album, Tilt. A considerably less modernist operatic approach, and certainly not half as bleak and dramatic, this recording is an elegant score to the obscure French film of the same name. For those who could not get enough of that elegiac masterpiece, they will find aspects of his sprawling avant-garde arrangements here.
Added to the playlist
Light
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Postby ShayLaB » Thu Oct 06, 2011 10:57 pm

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2006 - The Drift

Oh my...where to start with this one?

There is no way to categorize this album...it bears no resemblance to rock, pop, classical or opera. It is as far away as you can possible get from his earlier career. If you are hearing this for the first time and haven't been 'eased' in by Tilt then you are going to hate it. It is deliberately unsettling and bloody minded...and aside from its predecessor there is nothing that sounds remotely like it. A unique and demanding experience.

From Allmusic Review:
If 1984's Climate of Hunter put the MOR in morose, Tilt avoided the road completely and went straight toward the fractured, fraught images inside Walker's nightmares. It was entirely removed from anything that could've been classified as contemporary. The Drift isn't an equally severe leap from Tilt, but it is darker, less arranged, alternately more and less dense, and ultimately more frightening. Maybe it'll make your body temperature drop a few degrees. Working with what Walker has referred to as "blocks of sound," only a few of the album's 68 minutes have any connection to rock music.

...how much more bleak could this album be? None more bleak.
Added to the Playlist:
Cossacks Are
Clara
Jesse
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Postby ShayLaB » Thu Oct 06, 2011 11:51 pm

A terrifically interesting catalogue to rummage through...from the early pop sounds with the Walker Brothers through his Baroque years to the genre defying albums of late.

I don't think I have ever encountered an artist that has strayed quite so far from his original sound. You can trace a chronological drift in style over the years but The Drift is a different planet from the first solo album.

He is one of those artists that you often see referenced by musicians and in the press but never hear on the radio or through other people.

Hopefully this will represent a beginners guide to the best of Scott Walker. If, after listening to the odd track you were tempted to get hold of any of his material, I would recommend Scott, Scott4 and, if you are feeling adventurous, Tilt.


Scott Walker Playlist:

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Portrait (The Walker Brothers)
In My Room

Image
Scott
Mathilde
Montague Terrace (in blue)
Such a Small Love
Amsterdam


Image
Scott 2
Jackie
Next
The Girls from the Streets


Image
Scott 3
We Came Through


Image
Scott 4
The Seventh Seal
The World's Strongest Man
Angels of Ashes
Hero of the War
The Old Man`s Back Again
Get Behind Me
Duchess
Rhymes of Goodbye


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The Moviegoer
The Ballad Of Sacco And Vanzetti

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No Regrets (The Walker Brothers)
No Regrets

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Nite Flights (The Walker Brothers)
Nite Flights
The Electrician
Shut Out
Fat Mama Kick


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Climate of Hunter
Track 3
Track 5


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Tilt
Farmer in the City
The Cockfighter
Tilt


Image
Pola X
Light

Image
5 Easy Pieces (compilation)
Mrs Murphy
After The Lights Go Out


Image
The Drift
Cossacks Are
Clara
Jesse
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Postby ShayLaB » Wed Oct 12, 2011 9:19 am

Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds will be next.

Their name is probably more well known that his music...most people will know the name but few will be able to name more than a couple of songs. I am familiar with a couple of the raucous rockers and some of the gorgeous ballads they have produced but I always felt that I have never scratched beneath the surface. The next few weeks should fix that.

Same format as before...I'll report back with the best tracks on each album and create an overall playlist at the end. Hopefully I'll come across a bunch of great tracks and be able to share them.
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Postby AlexZ » Wed Oct 12, 2011 9:41 am

Good list for ABBA.
Some different with my list, but in summary is GOOD. :wink:
Where is "That's Me"?

Can I see anybody female singer in your lists?
Heidi Range - Change Your Wicked Ways
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v4XpC8BEE1I
Heidi Range, you are my angel and I love you.
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Postby ShayLaB » Wed Oct 12, 2011 11:35 am

AlexZ wrote:Good list for ABBA.
Some different with my list, but in summary is GOOD. :wink:
Where is "That's Me"?

Can I see anybody female singer in your lists?
I was close to doing Kate Bush...everybody knows a couple of hits but I doubt that many, outside the dedicated few, could name a single track in the last two decades. I not committing to her next time...something else may have popped into my head by then and taken me down a different path.
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Postby NothingFails » Wed Oct 12, 2011 8:07 pm

Awesome idea for a thread and I plan to check a lot of these links out.

Nick Cave isn't someone I've really checked out, but I like the song "Abattoir Blues"

Not a "Queen II" fan? I know that album splits opinions between camps who think it's Queen's greatest work or unlistenable pretention. I like other albums better but there are some tracks on it I really like such as "March Of The Black Queen" and "Father To Son".
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Postby ShayLaB » Wed Oct 12, 2011 11:19 pm

NothingFails wrote:Awesome idea for a thread and I plan to check a lot of these links out.

Nick Cave isn't someone I've really checked out, but I like the song "Abattoir Blues"

Not a "Queen II" fan? I know that album splits opinions between camps who think it's Queen's greatest work or unlistenable pretention. I like other albums better but there are some tracks on it I really like such as "March Of The Black Queen" and "Father To Son".
I read that initially as "it's Queen's greatest work of unlistenable pretention."...which made me laugh as it seems so apt.

Nick cave and the Bad Seeds have 14 studio albums but there are loads of side projects and individual tracks. I'll check out as many of these as seem appropriate also.

OK, lets get started...
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Postby ShayLaB » Wed Oct 12, 2011 11:46 pm

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2004 - Abattoir Blues

Abattoir Blues was released as part of the same package as The Lyre of Orpheus...two albums in the one box rather than a double CD. It's is more of a rock record than I had expected. My impression was that this sort of raucous rock'n'roll was primarily in their past. Most of the reviews do make mention that it is a departure from the norm.

Both albums were made in 12 days. It seems this was somewhat slow as "the first Grinderman record was done in four days...and ‘Dig, Lazarus, Dig!!!’ took maybe five days to make."



Added to the playlist:

Get Ready for Love
There She Goes My Beautiful World
Nature Boy
Let the Bells Ring


First impressions...great, great lyrics. Intelligent and articulate.
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Postby ShayLaB » Fri Oct 14, 2011 5:42 pm

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The Lyre of Orpheus - 2004

The second half of the double album release. The songs tend to be less brash but no less impressive. The opening title track is probably not representative of rest of the album but it I love some of the imagery in the lyrics.

Added to the playlist:
The Lyre of Orpheus
Breathless
Babe, You Turn Me On
Easy Money

I also listened to the début album, "From Her to Eternity" but really didn't like it. I knew the older albums would be less polished but I really struggled to find the appeal. Perhaps it caught me at a particularly unreceptive time...I shall revisit it again in a few weeks.
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Postby ShayLaB » Sun Oct 16, 2011 9:27 pm

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Wikipedia:
The Boatman's Call is the tenth studio album by Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds, released in 1997. The album, which is entirely piano-based and a departure from the band's post-punk catalogue, remains one of the most critically acclaimed releases of Nick Cave's career.

Musically, the album's tone is considered sombre and minimalist and marks a major departure for Cave and The Bad Seeds. Moving away from full-band arrangements and character-based narratives, the album's music and lyrics move towards the more intimate sound of Cave's solo voice accompanied by piano or a few other instruments. The tempo is also generally slow, reflecting many of the moods of the songs. Many of the lyrics seem to reflect on Cave's personal relationships and spiritual yearnings at the time of writing. Some songs are thought to be directed at either the mother of Cave's youngest son Luke, Viviane Carneiro (in "Where Do We Go Now But Nowhere?") or PJ Harvey, with whom he had a brief relationship around that time (as referenced in "West Country Girl", "Black Hair" and "Green Eyes").

Cave performed "Into My Arms" at the funeral of Michael Hutchence and demanded that the TV cameras be shut off for his performance out of respect for Hutchence.
The album is slow-tempoed and you probably have to be in the right mood to sit through it from start to finish...but a couple of the songs are absolutely stunning. 'Into My Arms' and '(Are You) The One That I've Been Waiting For?' were the two singles from the album: if my Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds playlist was only going to a dozens songs long I can fathom no scenario in which they would not make the cut.

Added to playlist:
Into My Arms
People Ain't No Good
Brompton Oratory
(Are You) The One That I've Been Waiting For?
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