Britney Spears - ...Baby One More Time

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Postby MrLeonix » Tue Oct 23, 2018 1:45 pm

20 YEARS AGO "BABY ONE MORE TIME" WAS RELEASED !

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This day, 20 years ago "Baby One More Time" was released as Britney Spears' first single giving birth to one of the most iconic careers of the music business.

"I had been in studio for about six months listening and recording material, but I hadn't really heard a hit yet. When I started working with Max Martin in Sweden, he played the demo for 'Baby One More Time' for me, and I knew from the start it [was one] of those songs you want to hear again and again. It just felt really right. I went into the studio and did my own thing with it, trying to give it a little more attitude than the demo. In 10 days, I never even saw Sweden. We were so busy".

—Spears talking to Chuck Taylor of Billboard.
"Baby One More Time" was released and turned into an inmediate mediatic and viral phenomenom around the world reaching #1 in every country it charted thus becoming one of the most successful pop songs of all time, one of the best selling physical singles of all time and it's currently one of the 5 biggest female singles in UK chart history.

The song became one of the most celebrated pop classics of the last 2 decades appearing in critics and magazines lists often labelling it as one of the greatest songs of the 90s and one of the biggest pop classics of all time which cemented the song through the year with solid recurrent and catalog stats on streaming services.

A heavily iconic music video was key in the process:

The plan was to have the video in a cartoon-like environment, in a likely attempt to attract the audience of younger children. Spears was unhappy with this, and argued that she wanted her video to reflect the lives of her fans and wanted to set the video in a school. Spears pitched this idea to Dick, and further explained she wanted the video to have dance scenes. The original setting was scrapped and replaced with Spears's concept. Dick's original idea for the wardrobe was jeans and a T-shirt, but during the wardrobe fitting Spears decided to change it for a schoolgirl outfit. Dick said that "Every piece of wardrobe in the video came from Kmart, and I was told at the time not one piece of clothing in the video cost more than $17. On that level, it's real. That probably, in retrospect, is a part of its charm." The knotted shirt design was Spears's idea, she recollects saying, "The outfits looked kind of dorky, so I was like, 'Let's tie up our shirts and be cute'"


The legendary music video where Britney is daydreaming through the high school hallways wearing a catholic scolar uniform became part of the pop culture and still remains to be one of the most iconic music videos of all time, a straight MTV staple multiple publications have listed "Baby One More Time" as one of the most impacting music videos of the 1990s decade giving birth to one of the most iconic pop careers in the music business.

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Happy 20th Anniversary to "Baby One More Time" !! . . 8-)
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Postby MrLeonix » Tue Oct 23, 2018 3:34 pm

INDEPENDENT UK: '...Baby One More Time' at 20: Why Britney Spears's song was such a global hit

On this day in 1998, Max Martin’s songwriting prowess and Britney Spears’s star power combined to make history. Lucy Jones reflects on one of the greatest pop songs of all time

t’s autumn 1998. The nights are drawing in and the mornings are gloomy. You’re in a car or bus on the way to school and Radio 1’s on the stereo. What kind of boring, stupid stuff are you going to have to do today? It’s sooo early and you’re sooo tired. Dun DUN DUN. “Oh bwoybay, bwoybay”. Dun DUN DUN. Your ears tune in and you ask your mum to turn it up. It’s Britney Spears’s debut single “...Baby One More Time” and by the first chorus you’re hooked. On Saturday morning, you, like 10 million other people will do across the world, head to Woolies to buy the single on cassette, propelling the track to No 1 in every country it entered the charts.

Listen to it 20 years later and it’s still a startling, catchy pop song (although the optics of the video are more obviously problematic). But what actually, apart from a heady dose of personal nostalgia if you grew up in the Nineties, makes the song so good? First off, two words: Max Martin.

The songwriter’s musical background was eclectic. He grew up in a small island off the coast of Sweden listening to Elton John, Queen, Vivaldi, Mozart, Depeche Mode and the Bangles. He learnt how to read and write music thanks to a public music-education programme, and formed a glam-rock band called It’s Alive. Their albums bombed, but you can hear in the songs Martin’s acute understanding of pop, and his ability to use a voice to communicate emotion. He also landed a record deal with the late, legendary Swedish songwriter and producer Denniz PoP on Cheiron, who hired him and nurtured his songwriting talent. He started writing for Backstreet Boys, Westlife and Robyn. But “...Baby One More Time” was the first major commercial hit for the multimillionaire songwriting powerhouse.

The melody came to him one evening while he was falling asleep. He reluctantly forced himself to get out of bed to record it, and got back into bed. It wasn’t right, so he came up with a better hook, but he felt really tired. Then he forced himself up again and sang into his dictaphone: “Hit me baby one more time, yeah that’s pretty good,” in a very sleepy, lethargic voice.

At the time, he thought it was an R&B track and offered it to TLC. They turned it down because of the “hit me baby” lyrics. They weren’t the only ones to be confused. People have interpreted it to be about S&M or domestic violence. In fact, Martin thought he was using “hit” as the American slang for “call”. As in, “hit me up”. The song is about wanting to get back together with an ex, nothing more sinister. After Backstreet Boys passed, Martin sent it to Jive Records for Britney Spears and the rest is history. The record label quickly changed the “hit me” to ellipses.

Why was the song itself so catchy? For a start – and this is a common Martin technique – snippets of melody are repeated throughout. The DUN DUN DUN piano chords which open the track, for example. The staccato piano keys in the higher register. The funky wah-wah guitars and slap bass. This gives a sense of familiarity and you know immediately, within two seconds, what the song is. Martin came from the DJ world, where it was important to write a song that could be recognised quickly to keep people on the dance floor.

There is a simplicity and economy that goes along with the looping of motifs. The track is in C minor, an intriguing key associated with longing, sadness, intensity and passion. To make it even more interesting, it lurches between the normal C minor scale and the C harmonic minor – Martin uses a natural to cancel out the B flat.

The beat’s straightforward, four-on-the-floor rhythm with punchy, crashy backbeat kick and compressed snare drums is typical of early Max Martin. The dynamics are simple and solid. The “bridge” is more repetition of what we’ve heard before rather than a middle eight of completely different harmonic structure. The bottom drops out of the music and Britney’s voice is accompanied by a simple piano before the song crescendos into a maximalist: “I must confess! That my loneliness! Is killing me now!”

There are many theories about Max Martin’s secret songwriting formula. People believe he uses “melodic maths”, which involves getting to a chorus within the first 50 seconds of a song and using no more than three or four parts to build a track. Martin rarely gives interviews but he has given a few which can give us some information about how he writes.

“If the chords change a lot over the course of a song, it’s better to stay within the same melodic structure,” he told Swedish financial newspaper Dagens Industri. “It’s all about the balance.”

He’s also talked about changing the energy of the first, second and third chorus of a song. “It’s all about getting the listener to keep his or her concentration.”

Of course, it’s not just about Martin. Britney’s “baby voice”, which is different to her natural voice, is signature and instantly recognisable from the first “Oh baby baby”. According to Martin, she had a “good sense of catching the melody, performing it, taking it to another level. That’s what you’re looking for as a songwriter.” She is often adept at communicating the emotional content of a song.

But music historian John Seabrook makes an interesting point. He was allowed to hear a Max Martin demo for “...Baby One More Time” while he was researching his book The Song Machine: Inside The Hit Factory. “The Swede sounded exactly like Spears,” he writes, and made the point that Britney – and Katy Perry, Taylor Swift and all the many pop superstars that Martin has sold his songs to – are basically all singing covers of Max Martin recordings.

Would it have been such a big hit if Max Martin had worn the pigtails instead of Britney? Undoubtedly not. But, behind the scenes – the millions of singles sold, videos viewed and dollars made – the songwriting nous of a 27-year-old at the start of his career looms large.
Source: https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-ente ... 95721.html
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Postby MrLeonix » Tue Oct 23, 2018 3:45 pm

US WEEKLY: Britney Spears’ Debut Single ‘…Baby One More Time’ Turns 20: How It Created a Pop Icon

Britney Spears' career almost got off to a very different start.

In 1997, when music on the radio ranged from bubblegum dance (Aqua’s “Barbie Girl”) to gangsta rap (The Notorious B.I.G.’s “Mo Money Mo Problems”) to soft-rock power ballads (Céline Dion’s “All By Myself”) and everything in between, songwriter Max Martin penned a catchy pop track titled “Hit Me Baby One More Time.” He originally intended for it to be included on TLC’s album FanMail, but the R&B girl group ultimately rejected it. Instead of scrapping the tune, Martin decided to send it over to Jive Records, which had just signed a 15-year-old singer from a small town in Louisiana whom the label hoped would become its next big act.

Right off the bat, Jive executives had one major concern: They feared listeners would think the song condoned domestic violence. (It turned out that TLC’s Tionne “T-Boz” Watkins also sought issue with the lyrical content, as she told MTV Opens a New Window. in 2013, “Was I going to say, ‘Hit me baby one more time?’ Hell no!“) Luckily, the solution was a fairly easy one. “Hit Me” was removed from the title and replaced by an ellipsis, though the lyrics remained untouched.

The label invited Spears to a studio in Stockholm in March 1998 to record her vocals for “Baby.” Due to nerves and inexperience, the teen underperformed in the booth. She returned the next day feeling more relaxed and gave it another go. The second time around, she knocked it out of the park.

“I knew it was a great song,” Spears, now 36, told The Guardian Opens a New Window. in August ahead of the 20th anniversary. “It was different and I loved it.”

“…Baby One More Time” was released on October 23, 1998, as Spears’ debut single. She was just 16 years old at the time, but quickly made her presence known with the earworm’s instantly recognizable three-note introductory motif followed by her delivery of the now-iconic first line: “Oh, bay-beh, bay-beh.” Entertainment Weekly Opens a New Window. reviewed the track as a “candy-pop-with-a-funky-edge smash,” while Rolling Stone Opens a New Window. went on to call it “some of the best radio pop of the past decade-plus.” In January 1999, “Baby” secured the No. 1 spot on the Billboard Hot 100, where it remained for two consecutive weeks. It found even longer success on MTV, which had the accompanying music video on heavy rotation each afternoon on TRL.

But like the song itself, the video got off to a very different start. It all began when director Nigel Dick, who had previously worked with rock bands such as Guns N’ Roses and Oasis, signed on to helm the project. “I’ve always been a fan of great pop songs, and this one impressed me right away,” Dick tells Us Weekly exclusively. “Once we started on the job, [Spears] struck me as extremely professional and hard-working.”

So hard-working, in fact, that the ex-Mouseketeer immediately took control of the vision. “The record label rejected my initial idea and simply said, ‘Britney has an idea. Why don’t you get on the phone and talk to her about it?‘” Dick recalls to Us. “Initially, I was a bit bent out of shape, and then I realized that A) I’d gone to an all-boys school in England, and that B) I was no longer 16, so perhaps Britney had a better grasp of what 16-year-old girls might want to see in a music video.”

Spears even made sure that she had a say in the wardrobe. “It was my idea to do the whole schoolgirl outfit and us being at school and having the dance numbers throughout it,” she told Vevo Opens a New Window. in 2012.

The “Baby” video was filmed over two days in early August 1998 at Venice High School in Los Angeles, the same location used two decades earlier for John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John’s movie Grease.

“It was really, really hectic and nerve-wracking because it was my first video and I was really nervous about how the end results were going to turn out,” Spears said in a behind-the-scenes video Opens a New Window. released at the time. “I remember the first day I was on the set when we were shooting ‘…Baby One More Time.’ There was, like, all these people there. I was like, ‘Oh, my goodness.’ I didn’t realize it was going to be that big of a production.”

The video began with Spears sitting in class, tapping a pencil on her desk and staring at the clock rather than her teacher, who was played by her real-life assistant, Felicia Culotta. When the bell finally rang, Spears and her classmates ran into the hallway and began a choreographed dance routine. The budding pop star, with her hair in pigtails, wore her risqué take on a traditional Catholic school uniform: a gray cardigan over a short black skirt and a white button-down shirt tied around her midriff.

“She rejected my plan to wear jeans, T-shirts, etc. and said, ‘Wouldn’t I be wearing a school uniform?’” Dick recounts to Us. “It was a simple step to take her ideas on board. Plus, I really like it if the artist has a usable idea because then the video is truly something that reflects them and not who I think they might be.”

Throughout the shoot, Spears was “always ready to do another take,” according to the director.

“[She] impressed me a lot,” Dick tells Us. “I subsequently worked with another young female artist who wanted to do a dance video, and she said she wanted to ‘out-Britney’ Britney, and I thought, ‘You’ll have to work very hard to do that.’ In the end, the other artist didn’t even come close.”

Dick went on to direct three more of Spears’ videos: “Sometimes,” “(You Drive Me) Crazy” and “Oops!…I Did It Again.” He admits that he has not seen her since 2000, but he has continued to follow the many ups and occasional downs of her high-profile career.

Two decades later, “Baby” remains one of the bestselling singles of all time and is widely regarded for redefining pop music. It scored a Grammy nomination for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance as well as three MTV Video Music Award nods. To date, the music video is the most-watched on Spears’ YouTube Opens a New Window. page, with more than 365 million views. “Baby” has also been a staple on all of Britney’s setlists, from her arena tours to her four-year Las Vegas residency, Britney: Piece of Me.

“It was such a fun and crazy time,” Spears told The Guardian in August. “It was a bit of a blur.”
Source: https://www.usmagazine.com/entertainmen ... a-history/
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Postby Thriller » Tue Oct 23, 2018 5:59 pm

It'll always be a 1999 song to us Brits (no pun intended)!

Twenty years though... gosh. I can remember seeing the video for the first time and just knowing it was a moment.

It's one of the best pop songs in history, up there with Billie Jean and Like A Prayer. The composition is genius.
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Postby Fan » Tue Oct 23, 2018 6:52 pm

A truly iconic pop song that has stood the test of time and deserves it's place in pop history.

And crazy to think it has been 20 years now. I was a seven-year-old boy when this came out and I remember just being obsessed with the video and putting the music channels on in the hope to see it again.
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Postby Benny » Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:04 pm

I remember listening to a German radio station that was broadcasting the US Singles Charts in December 1998. They played '...Baby One More Time' because it had entered the top 10 and I immediately loved it. I managed to record it on tape and played it non-stop for weeks.
It then came to Europe in February 1999 and I was very happy that it became a huge hit.
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Postby Debs_Wild » Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:48 pm

I miss the Britney of 1998-2004. Sadly, she's long gone.

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Postby MrLeonix » Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:52 pm

1,7 million units in UK 8-)



It was the 5th best selling songs overall (male, female, or band) of the 1990s decade in the UK. :)

This really hit strong when it came out.
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Postby Goldmoney » Tue Oct 23, 2018 8:33 pm

Has it really been that long? It does not feel like 20 years at all. :o This was such a movement, I remember even all the black girls in my hoodrat school wanting to be like Britknee.

Happy anniversary! Still one of the best pure pop songs ever!
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Postby GetBack » Wed Oct 24, 2018 12:57 am

I didn't know that it debuted at #17! That was such a high debut for an unknown artist! :o :o :o :o

Play It Again, Max: How the Piano Riff to Britney Spears' 'Baby One More Time' Became the Most Iconic Hook of Its Era

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Twenty years ago this month, Britney Spears released her epochal debut single “...Baby One More Time.” This week, Billboard celebrates the pivotal pop classic two decades later, starting with a look back at the three-note Max Martin piano riff that introduced Britney to the world.

By late 1998, the previously grunge-dominated ‘90s had shifted in focus to an R&B and pop hybrid that was largely the brainchild of one man: Swedish top 40 maestro Max Martin. After achieving worldwide success through his work with Ace of Base, Backstreet Boys and Robyn, Martin was enlisted to submit demos for a new artist recently signed to Jive records: a 16-year-old Mickey Mouse Club alum named Britney Spears.

“He came to America, and we introduced him to Britney,” remembers Steve Lunt, then an A&R executive for Jive. “And he said, ‘I think I’ve got just the song…’

That song was “Hit Me Baby One More Time,” an instantly striking example of what Lunt refers to as “a Swedish version of what [Martin] thought was R&B” -- a slowly building pop anthem based around funky bass pops, chirping keys, and most importantly, a syncopated three-note piano riff that introduces the song. “It was clear right from the very beginning of the song that it was something special,” Lunt says. “Obviously, it was a hit.”

The title of the song eventually shifted from the demo -- losing the “Hit Me” part, for fears it would be mistaken for a reference to domestic violence -- but the signature hook was largely unchanged on the recording, released as Spears’ debut single in October 1998. “We added more distortion to it, generally just enhancing it,” co-producer Rami Yacoub says of capturing the riff in his and Martin’s Stockholm studio. “That was rock solid [already], so we never touched it or strayed away from the blueprint.”

Though the “Baby” piano riff was almost stupefying in its simplicity -- a B flat followed by two C notes -- it quickly proved indelible through repetition, appearing three times in the first 13 seconds alone. By the end of one listen, the riff had been hammered into your brain for all time, making the song seem larger than life right from its opening measure. “As soon as you hear those notes, you know what song it is,” Lunt explains. “I can’t think of another song like that.”

And while the riff itself is straightforward, its use in the song is designed to be jarring and deceptive. “The rising movement of the three-note hook starts a full step below the key the song is written in, which in itself is unique -- you don’t expect it,” explains Kristin Yost, a piano expert and Executive Director for the Centre for Music Minds. “Combine this with the syncopated rhythm and punchy accents, and you get what I would call a power move. ‘Pay attention to me!’”

Its demand for attention was soon heeded: “Baby” debuted at No. 17 on the Billboard Hot 100 in November 1998, and climbed to No. 1 the next January, staying on top for two weeks. It was the first No. 1 single for Spears, Martin and Yacoub, and would spawn countless soundalikes in its wake. “Being in A&R, I had every songwriter in the world trying to submit songs for Britney,” Lunt recalls of the period following “Baby.” “It’s amazing how songwriters who never wrote like that before in their lives were suddenly writing things that sounded like they were Swedish.”​

Still, none of the similar hits that followed could match the immediate impact of “Baby,” iconic from its very first notes. “The riff is like the bold accessory to an otherwise sharp-looking, all-black outfit; similar to say red, uniquely shaped glasses,” offers Yost. “The outfit is good on its own, but add a pop of something special -- and simple -- and all of a sudden the whole outfit stands out.”

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Postby Instinct » Wed Oct 24, 2018 12:59 am



:cry:
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Postby GetBack » Wed Oct 24, 2018 1:11 am

The video is still banned in many countries. :roll: :roll: :roll:
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Postby JSparksFan » Wed Oct 24, 2018 2:15 am

This is still the best pure pop song of all-time. Happy 20th, "...Baby".
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Postby Thriller » Wed Oct 24, 2018 6:23 pm

Quite bittersweet watching her at 16, everything ahead of her, so much positivity and energy and untainted by fame.
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Postby MrLeonix » Wed Oct 24, 2018 6:41 pm

This is a very important publication because it comes from "New Musical Express (NME)" and they recognize Britney's influence and impact on the new generation of artists:

NME: The Story of Britney Spears’ ‘…Baby One More Time’

As Britney Spears’ debut single turns twenty, we remember the song that changed pop forever

Charli XCX throws back to one of the biggest and influential pop singles of the last twenty years on her brand new nostalgia-fest ‘1999’. “Sing, ‘hit me, baby, one more time,’ she drawls in the chorus, name-dropping Britney Spears’ debut single as she remembers cruising around her old neighbourhood with the radio blaring. The song, which changed the face of pop music, turns twenty today, and most kids (and adults tbh) around in the nineties will have a similar memory of howling along to ‘…Baby One More Time’s iconic bridge.

According to Charli she incorporated the Britney-referencing lyric in at the suggestion of pop powerhouse Max Martin, who produced ‘1999’ and also co-wrote Spears’ debut single. It was the producer’s big commercial breakthrough after penning previous songs with Robyn, Backstreet Boys, and Westlife; today he’s a lead engineer when it comes to the shape of current music. “That [lyric] came from him,” Charli told Billboard. “He not only made the song better, but he also referenced himself in a song he and wrote and produced that [was big] in 1999. I was like, “That’s why he’s the king of pop.” The queen of pop, of course, has to be Britney Spears herself.

Take stock of Charli XCX’s playful visual aesthetics – over the years she’s donned drag to impersonate Steve Jobs, paced the playground herself in the Iggy Azalea collab ‘Fancy’, and thrown a cowboy-tinted pool party with Rita Ora for ‘Doing It’ – and the parallels with the music video for ‘…Baby One More Time’ are obvious. In fact, it’s safe to say that without Britney’s iconic classroom moment, complete with tied up shirt and fluffy pink biro, we may not have Katy Perry’s cupcake bras, Taylor Swift’s pantomime villain effort ‘Look What You Made Me Do, Selena Gomez’s whispery ‘Bad Liar’, Rihanna’s joyful sensuality or Lady Gaga’s playful creativity in ‘Paparazzi’. Countless other pop artists making music today also owe at least a few dues to what Britney began in 1998.

Before Britney Spears arrived on the scene, 90s pop was largely dominated by vocally acrobatic ballad-belters. Hitting every note imaginable, nonchalantly flying through octaves like it’s no big deal, Whitney Houston’s version of ‘I Will Always Love You’ smashed through a whole horde of world records in ‘92. Spawning legions of lesser imitators in X Factor audition rooms across the country for the next two decades, Mariah Carey’s pipes caused a minor earthquake the following year with the frankly enormous ‘Hero’. And the year before ‘…Baby One More Time’ came out, Celine Dion’s ‘My Heart Will Go On’ – aka. the absolute pinnacle of rousing movie theme songs – became one of the biggest singles of all time.

Even Madonna – historically a bit of an outlier when it comes to flashy over-singing – even got in on the trend for gigantic ballads, putting her own spin on ‘Don’t Cry For Me Argentina’. Then, along came Britney.

Britney Spears, with her uniquely measured voice – an ever-so-slightly nasal grit roughening up the edges like vocal sandpaper – was different to everyone else out there. Aside from Max Martin collaborator Robyn (whose single ‘Show Me Love’ directly influenced Spears and her team) there were no other artists straddling bubblegum and Rn’B in quite the same way. Forgoing an emotive powerhouse vocal in favour of saying something else entirely, a new era was born

Spears’ tone is occasionally referred to as “baby voice”. Not only is that a bit infantilising, it’s not giving the singer much credit. Rather, it’s a tone that Spears had been working on for some time; purposefully choosing to restrain her vocals in order to convey something rougher, and more suggestive. It worked. With ‘…Baby One More Time’ Britney Spears emerged a fully realised star, and the opening verse of ‘…Baby One More Time’ has long been imitated since its release in ‘98 – most accurately by Ariana Grande on SNL – for good reason. Immediately recognisable from the second those three distinct piano chords thud into life, the single shot straight to number one in every single country it charted in across the world.

The song originally came to life when Max Martin woke up in the middle of the night, with the chorus line “hit me baby one more time”, stuck in his head. Stumbling out of bed and locating his dictaphone, “I remember listening back to [the tape] after [the song] blew up and you can hear me sort of go: ‘Hit me baby one more time’,” Martin told Jan Gradvall in 2016. “Then I hear myself say, Yeah, it’s pretty good.” After sketching out the song, Martin offered it to Rn’B champs TLC, who objected to the use of the phrase “hit me” in the chorus. They turned it down, and despite a last minute coup attempt – Simon Cowell reportedly requested a re-write for Five – the song ultimately went to a newcomer named Britney Spears, who had just signed to Jive.

Signing, originally, was a struggle. When Britney met with labels in the US, she was dismissed straight away. The late-90s audience, they reportedly said, wanted to hear groups instead – the next Spice Girls or TLC. “There wasn’t going to be another Madonna, another Debbie Gibson, or another Tiffany,” a label is quoted as saying in Mark Hughes’ book Buzzmarketing: get people to talk about your stuff. Two weeks later, Jive rang Spears’ manager Larry Rudolph – they had spotted the potential. After a month of ’development’ – honing that distinctive vocal – she then headed to Martin’s Stockholm studio to record. One of those tracks was ‘…Baby One More Time’. “I think Max is a genius. It all just came together and felt right,” Spears told The Guardian earlier this year.

With a home now located for the smash hit in waiting, Britney and her team began work on the video. The singer was instrumental in the final direction, suggesting the entire setting and concept for the video. Shot in Venice High School – the same location used for Grease – the visual follows the star as a bored student in a catholic school. It perfectly tapped into the success of the decade’s various High School movies, and spoke to her fans without patronising them with cartoons and babyish imagery.

Along with incorporating dance routines to the video, Britney also switched the costumes, bringing in school uniforms in place of the jeans and t-shirts her director Nigel Dick brought to the table originally. “Every piece of wardrobe in the video came from Kmart, and I was told at the time not one piece of clothing in the video cost more than $17,” Dick said of the video, speaking to MTV in 2009. “On that level, it’s real. That probably, in retrospect, is a part of its charm.”

‘…Baby One More Time’ faced predictable criticism. Some called the song vapid. Others suggested that Britney Spears (dramatic gasp) baring her midriff would corrupt the youth of America. In reply, she had the perfect comeback. “Me showing my belly?” Dick recalls her saying. “I’m from the South; you’re stupid if you don’t wear a sports bra [when you] go to dance class, you’re going to be sweating your butt off.”

In the face of many of the questionable videos of the 90s, which sexualised women to disturbing degrees, men behind the cameras, Britney Spears was a pop star in charge of her image, calling the shots, and blending innocence and experience expectedly in one iconic music moment. Leading the way in pop, ‘…Baby One More Time’ was just the first single from a star unashamed of expressing her sexuality. Twenty years later, it still stands out as a moment that paved the way for countless artists to come.
Source: https://www.nme.com/blogs/nme-blogs/sto ... me-2392821
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Postby RayRay » Wed Oct 24, 2018 7:15 pm

It was the first thing I bought by Britney. Still have this cd-single.
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Postby MrLeonix » Wed Oct 24, 2018 7:32 pm

This site made a cool article . . . unfortunately you'll need to subscribe in order to read the full thing and I'm not paying any sh*t . . . however the couple paragrahps they displayed were interesting enough . .

THE ECONOMIST: How “…Baby One More Time” changed pop music

Such a potent combination of song, star and marketing has rarely been seen since its release two decades ago

THERE have been many significant and powerful entries into the music industry. With the whimsical “Wuthering Heights” Kate Bush became, at 19 years old, the first female artist to top the British charts with a self-penned song. “I Want You Back”, one of many timeless numbers to roll off Motown’s famed production line, signified the start of the Jackson dynasty. When punk arrived in the 1970s it brought with it many arresting anthems: the Ramones’ “Blitzkrieg Bop”, the Sex Pistols’ “Anarchy in the U.K.” and the Undertones’ “Teenage Kicks”. The greatest debut in the world of pop music took place 20 years ago, on October 23rd 1998. The first offering from a teen from Kentwood, Louisiana, named Britney Spears, the song began with three piano chords and an uncanny voice: “Oh baby, baby…”

“…Baby One More Time”, a plaintive lament on loneliness and longing, was a phenomenon. It reached the number one spot in every country in which it charted. It sold nearly 500,000 copies in its first week in Britain in February 1999 and went on to become the biggest single there that year, shifting 1.4m copies in total. Driven by the song’s impact, an LP of the same name sold 8.3m copies in America in 1999. After a decade of rap, rave and alternative rock, here was something that cut straight to the heart and emotional angst of teenagers, offered by an approachable young singer.
source: https://www.economist.com/prospero/2018 ... -pop-music
Britney Spears . Michael Jackson . Madonna . Metallica . Radiohead . Led Zeppelin . Oasis . Beyoncé . Soda Stereo
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Postby Goldmoney » Wed Oct 24, 2018 7:36 pm

Wow, even political companies are posting retrospective articles on BOMT. :o
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Postby GetBack » Thu Oct 25, 2018 12:11 am

So much acknowledgement of the song and video's legacy! :o :o :o I didn't expect that since Britney has always been a guilty pleasure for general audiences. :cry: :cry: :cry:

It's funny how it never won a VMA. :evil: :evil:
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Postby Benjamin » Thu Oct 25, 2018 1:03 pm

This song was an instant classic. I remember watching the video for the first time on tv.
I was hooked.
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Postby Guru » Thu Oct 25, 2018 9:25 pm

For those who remember this :P

| Ciara | Beyoncé | Janet | Toni | Kelly R | Leona | Tinashe | Whitney | Brandy | Monica | Tevin | Mariah | Britney |
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Postby Guru » Thu Oct 25, 2018 9:29 pm

One more for the nostalgia :P
Are these official remixes? I love the beats!

| Ciara | Beyoncé | Janet | Toni | Kelly R | Leona | Tinashe | Whitney | Brandy | Monica | Tevin | Mariah | Britney |
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Postby jszmiles » Thu Oct 25, 2018 11:02 pm

nostalgia or not, I think it is one of the most overrated songs ever recorded. I still can't believe it was that popular and sold that much. Yeah and unfortunately it started many as much overrated careers as the song itself.....

Britney had many better and much catchier songs, sadly not that successful.
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Postby GetBack » Thu Oct 25, 2018 11:12 pm

I love how the old VMAs focused on the artist's performances. Nowadays, they always put in audience reactions which aren't needed. :roll: :roll: :roll:
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Postby MrLeonix » Fri Oct 26, 2018 10:27 pm

Her first single was so strong that she gained a main show VMA performance right away (not even a full year into her career).
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