Celine Dion - My Heart Will Go On

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Postby Wayne » Sat Nov 18, 2017 10:41 pm

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“My Heart Will Go On” Turns 20

Once, while on a third date and watching the end of Titanic on the couch, my date leaned over and prepared to say something. There was a loose trajectory of dating then, in the late-teen college years: too poor to do much of anything extravagant, but still interested in getting to know a person, one might first go out for ice cream. And then, for a second date, you would do something free but beautiful, like walk through the topiary garden downtown. The third date, though, was when an apartment or dorm room could be introduced. While not placing any expectations on physical activity, it did raise the stakes. To be in a place where a couch must be shared (often due to a lack of furniture), or a place where the living room and bedroom are combined, can create a type of intimacy, even if it is just the intimacy of showing a person the places you think about them when they aren’t around.

I had never seen Titanic before, as it came out in theaters when I was 13 and not extremely interested. In the era before Netflix & Chill entered the cultural consciousness as a practice, having a movie night in with someone meant there was work involved. You would, for example, have to find a Blockbuster Video and then scour the racks for several exhausting minutes, picking out a film with a person who may have vastly different tastes than your own. You would pay to rent that VHS, which you then had to get into a car and drive to return 24 hours later — just enough labor to make watching a movie on a couch all the way through worth it. My date leaned over as the ship broke apart and bodies flailed from the ship’s freshly opened windows on the small TV screen in front of us. Expecting something romantic, I was surprised when she whispered in my ear, “You know, most of the people didn’t die from drowning. They froze to death. They had to thaw out some of the dead bodies to unstick them from each other.”

***
There are a lot of reasons why the film Titanic works, but the reason the love story is so instantly attractive is because you know from the very beginning that one of the lovers is going to die. Perhaps you might even think that both will die, but that isn’t how to sell a love story in the movies. It is a fascinating thing, to have a constructed romance that relies entirely on that which can be taken from a person. It was always going to be Jack and never Rose. Titanic isn’t exactly about a ship sinking as much as it is about how much a narrative can convince a viewer to care about the trajectory of two people before the ship sinks.

Titanic is also a race to a crescendo, which so happens to rest on the instrumental soundscape of “My Heart Will Go On,” crafted by James Horner for Céline Dion. The song first popped up on Dion’s 1997 album Let’s Talk About Love about a month before the film’s release (the album turns 20 years old this weekend) but had already been pegged as Titanic’s theme song by director James Cameron. “My Heart Will Go On” is atmospheric, relying on thick and whimsical flutes to build the background. The instrumental presents beautifully in the film, as it plays while scanning the deepest parts of the Atlantic Ocean at the film’s opening, and as the camera whisks through the Titanic’s ruins being brought back to life in the dream sequence at the film’s closing.

But it is Dion’s vocals that really spring the song to life in a way that gave it an existence outside of, and even beyond the film. It is hard to make a single song as full and generous as one of the biggest films of all time based off of one of the biggest tragedies of all time. Dion sang the original version — the one that eventually ended up in the film — in one take. At the 3:25 minute mark, her voice swells, taking the orchestral elements along with it. This is the real payoff of the song. The reason I return to any ballad is this and this alone: to find the massive moment that the song’s tenderness is building towards. The climax of all its sentimental can-kicking. “My Heart Will Go On” invites a listener to a soft dance before swallowing them whole.

***
There are a lot of scientific theories as to why the lookouts aboard the Titanic didn’t see the iceberg in time, and therefore couldn’t maneuver the massive ship away from its unfortunate destiny. The one I like most has to do with horizons. The Titanic was moving along the Labrador Current, which had air that cooled from the bottom up, creating a thermal inversion. A thermal inversion happens when layers of warm air settle over layers of cooler air, holding it down and preventing pollutants from rising upward, trapping the pollutants in the cool air.

A thermal inversion also bends light rays, refracting light abnormally and creating sensory illusions like a Superior Mirage, where objects appear higher and closer than they actually are, behind a false horizon. The false horizon then becomes the true horizon in your line of vision. Everything between it becomes hazy.

Because the sea was calm and the line between the true horizon and the false one was masked in a haze trapped within the cool air, the iceberg that would sink the Titanic was camouflaged until the ship was a mile away. Had the lookouts seen the iceberg just a minute or two earlier, the ship would have, perhaps, missed it. Or, at worst, had a brief brush with its surface.

People want to talk about the fact that an iceberg has a large, invisible body which stretches so far below the water that one might not be able to see the damage it is truly capable of inflicting from the water’s surface. But I am more fascinated by this idea that the Titanic was doomed by a trick of the eye, brought on by the night itself. Darkness as death’s shepherd. The line between a real horizon and a fake one. Something that is not there and then is. A waiting grave.

“My Heart Will Go On” plays most prominently in a dream sequence at the end of Titanic, when a young Rose sees a young Jack at the top of the ship’s winding staircase. She is wearing a flowing white dress and he is in his worker’s clothing. They kiss and the ship’s crew and passengers all applaud. This moment exists in the mind of an older version of Rose, sleeping in her bed. If we are to talk about darkness only by what it steals from our vision, then with enough darkness, we can all imagine ourselves into a type of peace. We all have our own horizons, true or not.

***
Let’s Talk About Love sold millions of copies, especially once Titanic proved itself to be a box office success and the song became inextricably linked to the film. The album sold 334,000 copies the week it was released in the US, then surged to a 624,000 sales total in its sixth week, before finally reaching the top of the Billboard charts in January of 1998 and remaining in one of the top two slots until May. The album is a bit overdone with awkward duets, like “Treat Her Like A Lady,” where Dion teams up with both Diana King and Brownstone. It was an album that found Dion trying to cast as wide a net as possible to cash in on her rising fame in the States, and was at its best when it leaned into songs like “My Heart Will Go On” or “The Reason.”

For her entire career, Céline Dion has found a way to make a conventional song anything but. She’s one of those singers who understands the voice as both an instrument and a tool to extract emotion from its listener. It’s why her song works in a movie about the horrific demise of a cruise ship, but also works at a wedding, and also works at a funeral, and also works at an airport, played overhead in the parting moments between two people who might see each other again in a week, or in a month, or in a year, or perhaps never.

All of these situations play to the same small handful of feelings: love, loss, and fear. There is a saying about poets — how many of us are writing the same three poems over and over again, and just finding new ways to do it. Dion has been pulling emotions down from the same cloud for decades now, and singing her way into each of them differently. But “My Heart Will Go On” was one of the moments where she hit every single emotion at once. I want the feeling the end of that song gives me always. I want to unbox it on every birthday of every year. I want to sink into it when I am in love, and then not. Perhaps “sink” is not the word I am looking for here, in the context of this story. Perhaps to be consumed is what I am actually asking for. To be consumed by the feeling, as Rose was at the end of Titanic, with an axe in her hands and freezing water up to her waist, attempting to free her love from the pipe he was handcuffed to in the hull of a ship going under. Oh, what it must be like to love someone so fiercely that you refuse to die alone.

***
The Titanic sank in 28-degree water, and the freezing temperature of the ocean was the ultimate undoing of the passengers. Hypothermia is clinical, but it’s simply what happens when heat runs from a body faster that the body can produce it. In 28-degree water, some people were dead within 20 minutes, floating in life jackets until the cold overtook them.

I’m haunted by what it must be like to watch death come for everyone around you and know that your number is soon to be called. A night sky wrecked by screams as you wait for the inevitable. I don’t know if death is freedom, but I know that waiting for it isn’t always, and waiting for it while everyone around you dies can’t be.

In 28-degree water, as severe hypothermia sets in, the heart rate drops to the 30s. When singers sing about hearts in love songs, I can’t imagine that they’re singing of the clinical heart. It feels like they are singing of the imaginary heart — the one drawn by children, the one candy shapes are made out of. The one cartoon animals have bulging out of their chests as a sign of attraction.

“My Heart Will Go On” is one of those songs that makes me believe in the labor of the clinical heart. It feels like work, perhaps because it is not about falling in love, but instead about surviving once love has left all of its chambers and vessels. All of the space it has to make a home for someone else.

***
I would rather freeze than drown, but what I’m mostly saying is that I would rather not fight against the water in my final moments. I would rather suffer peacefully against the door of memory, behind which is everyone I’ll miss.

***
I’ve seen the pictures and the memes and the tweets and the viral video and I am now willing to admit that maybe Jack could have fit on the door at the end of the movie, but then what would Céline even have to sing about? The heart needs something to go on from, and so yes, it seems a small sacrifice was made in the name of Jack, who could have fit on a door. Sacrifice the man for the timeless song — we’ve sacrificed others for far less.

***
I wouldn’t watch Titanic on a third date now, and not just because I am blessed with the fortune of a bigger apartment and Netflix. It is a beautifully tedious movie that drags a bit towards its inevitability in a way that leads me to turn to it only when it unexpectedly arrives on my TV screen during the casual flipping of channels, which it did five months ago, when I had no furniture and I was sitting on the floor of an apartment I moved into, brokenhearted. I did have a television and a cable box, and I caught Titanic near its climax, once again, in the moments right before the ship collides with the iceberg. I watched the ship and its passengers drown again. I watched Rose wake up on the door to realize that Jack is frozen again. I watched her dream him back to life, and I heard Céline’s voice echo through the film’s credits. I would like to say that I was moved to tears by nostalgia, and maybe I was. But mostly I was just very plainly sad, and I needed to hear a loud, corny ballad about perseverance. “My Heart Will Go On” is good for that, too. It’s another type of life jacket for another kind of drowning.

https://www.stereogum.com/1971196/my-he ... niversary/
Let's Talk About Love celebrated its 20th anniversary last week, but the more culturally significant fact is that My Heart Will Go On turned 20 years old also - where has that time gone?!



The song that made her a legend and solidified her career - THE biggest song of any description of the last 20 years.

I haven't always loved it, but over the years - I've grown to accept it as it's to much of a classic to be ignored. The version above is my favourite version of the song - incredible vocals.

Happy anniversary MHWGO!
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Postby JSparksFan » Sat Nov 18, 2017 10:57 pm

I think people berate it because it is by quite some margin her biggest hit, but almost everyone agrees that it isn't her best song. That being said, it is a beautiful song, and was a highlight when I saw her live in May. The way crowds respond to this after so many years is something special.
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Postby menime123 » Sat Nov 18, 2017 11:31 pm

My first ever single purchase - boy do I feel old :oops:

It’s one of my favourite Céline songs, but perhaps not my favourite (IACBTMN and since the tour, TPOL). Disappointed that it was her worst performance on tour too (so disengaged) but I love it all the same.
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Postby Petrie » Sat Nov 18, 2017 11:35 pm

An absolute gorgeous song, it is cheesy but deep down everyone loves it.

It's legendary and will live on for years and years to come.
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Postby Goldmoney » Sat Nov 18, 2017 11:48 pm

The reason why the word iconic was invented
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Postby menime123 » Sat Nov 18, 2017 11:54 pm

I live so much for the vocal introduction she includes in live performances. It’s a shame it became so cool to consider the song so uncool, but I think everyone does it in a fun way - aside from Kate Winslet (and perhaps Céline herself), I doubt anyone really hates it.
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Postby Wayne » Sun Nov 19, 2017 12:00 am

menime123 wrote:I live so much for the vocal introduction she includes in live performances.
You mean what she does in this?



If so, yessss - angelic!
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Postby Petrie » Sun Nov 19, 2017 12:03 am

^ That is beautiful :cry:

I've never heard her do that intro before.
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Postby menime123 » Sun Nov 19, 2017 12:31 am

Wayne wrote:
menime123 wrote:I live so much for the vocal introduction she includes in live performances.
You mean what she does in this?



If so, yessss - angelic!
Yes, that :D

But I live in hope that one day she’ll skip the music (or most of it) and give a full on acoustic version and find a way to change the ending so she can sing the damn song in full live :lol:
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Postby KokoCollino » Sun Nov 19, 2017 12:36 am

Goosebumps before the final chorus, every time. One of the strongest feelings I ever have when listening to a song - even though it's not even one of my fave songs. The song is more of an event itself.
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Postby Goldmoney » Sun Nov 19, 2017 2:28 am

KokoCollino wrote:Goosebumps before the final chorus, every time. One of the strongest feelings I ever have when listening to a song - even though it's not even one of my fave songs. The song is more of an event itself.
Same here. I’m not even a huge fan of hers but that outro is one of the most majestic things I’ve ever heard. :cry:
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Postby BlueScorpion » Sun Nov 19, 2017 4:20 am

I can't believe there wasn't a thread for this already! :o :o

This is one of the cases a song was SO popular it ended being a victim of its success - to me it's still of her brightest moments, I don't care how overplayed it is this is gracious in all fronts.
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YOU'RE TOO STRONG!"
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Postby Benny » Sun Nov 19, 2017 8:38 am

The final chorus is everything
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Postby Benjamin » Sun Nov 19, 2017 8:40 am

Timeless classic.
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Postby MusicLover88 » Sun Nov 19, 2017 1:28 pm

I was in Prague a couple years ago and a man just started playing this on violin and it was stunning just how quickly the crowd wrapped up around him. People adore this song.
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Postby ludichris » Sun Nov 19, 2017 1:37 pm

You can't get any better than a good 90s love ballad and this is up there with the best of them.
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Postby Wayne » Sun Nov 19, 2017 1:38 pm



8-)
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Postby hellohello » Sun Nov 19, 2017 1:38 pm

Benny wrote:The final chorus is everything
The best part of this timeless classic. 8-)
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Postby menime123 » Sun Nov 19, 2017 1:47 pm

BlueScorpion wrote:I can't believe there wasn't a thread for this already! :o :o

This is one of the cases a song was SO popular it ended being a victim of its success - to me it's still of her brightest moments, I don't care how overplayed it is this is gracious in all fronts.
Surprised it took Wayne so long :lol:
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Postby Wayne » Sun Nov 19, 2017 1:59 pm

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The Oral History of Celine Dion's 'My Heart Will Go On': Controversies, Doubts & 'Belly Pains' In the Studio

Céline Dion never wanted to sing “My Heart Will Go On.” Actually, she hated it. “When I recorded it, I didn’t think about a movie; I didn’t think about radio,” she tells Billboard on the phone from her limo en route to her long-running show at the Colosseum at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas. “I thought, ‘Sing the song, then get the heck out of there.’” James Cameron, the director of Titanic, wasn’t exactly a fan, either: He was dead set against ending his epic with a pop song.

But “My Heart Will Go On” didn’t just take off -- it became synonymous with Cameron’s blockbuster movie, and a signature for Dion. Written by ­composer James Horner (who died in a 2015 plane crash at age 61) and lyricist Will Jennings, “My Heart Will Go On” debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 on Feb. 28, 1998, buoying the Titanic soundtrack’s 16-week run atop the Billboard 200. The song also appeared on Dion’s late-1997 disc Let’s Talk About Love, and together, the two albums sold more than 60 million copies, according to Sony Music.

Twenty years later, the anthem’s global ­influence shows no sign of abating. After Titanic’s release, it was memorably spoofed on Saturday Night Live (on Ana Gasteyer’s “The Céline Dion Show”) and South Park, and it continues to inspire countless memes (recently, “Titanic Hoops,” which sets basketball clips to the song’s climax). In 2016, according to Nielsen Music, “My Heart Will Go On” garnered 60 million on-demand audio and video streams, making it Dion’s most streamed song of the year, and the Titanic soundtrack is one of only seven soundtracks to be certified diamond by the RIAA.

In honor of the song’s 20th anniversary, Dion, 49, will perform “My Heart Will Go On” at the Billboard Music Awards. Billboard spoke with her -- as well as the song’s producers, Titanic team members and actor Billy Zane -- about tales of tension at the Grammy Awards, Kate Winslet’s real feelings about the song and even menstrual cramps in the studio.

The Beginning

Simon Franglen (co-producer, “My Heart Will Go On” ): The buzz was terrible. Titanic was the film that was going to bring down two studios, Fox and Paramount. The movie was meant to come out July 3; in April, it was still almost five hours long.

Randy Gerston (music supervisor, Titanic): We had done a record deal with Sony to do the soundtrack — just the Horner score — and I think the label imagined that they would get an ­end-title song into the film. Jim [Cameron] didn’t want to end the film with a pop song. His favorite bands were Ministry and Metallica. [Cameron ­reportedly said, “Would you put a song at the end of Schindler’s List?”]

Tommy Mottola (then-head of Sony Music Entertainment): Cameron was getting pressure from the studio to try and have something that would be an additional powerful marketing tool. And because the studio was on the hook for this picture, for what they’d spent they were looking for every marketing opportunity that they could get.

Jon Landau (executive producer, Titanic): It had nothing to do with the marketing. Jim was open to the idea of hearing it. But he was skeptical that a pop song would work at the end of this very ­dramatic, historical drama.

Glen Brunman (then-executive vp, Sony Music Soundtrax): We made the deal for the album in December 1996. We knew we were buying the rights to a score album only. No song, no Céline. We paid $800,000. No one had even come close to paying that. Everybody was calling the movie “Cameron’s Folly.”

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Enter Céline

Landau: James Horner went out — without us knowing it — and wrote the song. Horner was a romantic about life, you know?

Franglen: Céline at one point sang the lead vocal on the single from An American Tail: Fievel Goes West, which Horner wrote. She sounded ­exquisite, but she wasn’t a big star at the time, and they decided to go back to Linda Ronstadt, who had sung “Somewhere Out There” from An American Tail. But Horner always remembered Céline’s vocal. There came a point when James brought me a piano sketch of “My Heart Will Go On” and said, “Do you think this would work for Céline?”

Céline Dion: I was in a suite with a piano at Caesars Palace. [Horner] started to play the song. With all the respect that I have for James — poor him, this guy is looking above us right now — he is not the greatest singer. I was making this sign like, “This is not possible.” René [Angélil, Dion’s late husband] stopped him: “James, James, James. Listen to me. You’re not doing justice to the song right now. I’m going to make a deal with you: Let’s have Céline make a demo.” I wanted to choke my husband. Because I didn’t want to do it! I just came out of “Because You Loved Me,” and then “Beauty and the Beast” was, like, huge. Why do we need to break our nose?

Mottola: Behind closed doors, I think René told her this was going to be one of the biggest things in her career.

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Recording the Demo

Mottola: I remember going into the studio that night, around 9 p.m. We had all gone out to dinner.

Dion: I was mad! I don’t feel good. I have belly pains. My girly days are starting to happen. I’m going to have a black coffee with sugar -- which I never have on my studio days because it speeds up my vibrato. But I got to New York and I do that. And [Horner] is explaining to me what is the movie all about. He said, “Just think about that and do it.” I’m like (sarcastically), “All right, thanks. Thanks a lot.”

Mottola: It was myself, Céline, René, Jim Horner and Polly Anthony, who was then the president of Epic Records. Everything was kind of calm and quiet. Céline went in the booth and turned the lights down, and we could just faintly see her face. And she laid down this vocal -- nonstop, OK? One take. We were all getting chills.

Franglen: That very first “Near, far, ­wherever you are” -- everybody knew that she could belt, but there was something about the delicacy.

Dion: They’re all crying. And they said, “We’re done.” I said, “OK, well, I’m glad that you liked the demo.” Horner said, “We might not have to do it again.” I said, “What are you talking about?”

Landau: Now the question was, how to best present it to Jim?

Franglen: I did a decent mix. And James Horner carried around a cassette for weeks on weeks on weeks, waiting for the right time to play it for Cameron. He wanted him to be in a good mood.

Dion: I didn’t think that James Cameron is just going to buy this thing. James Cameron didn’t want to have a song in his movie. “My movie is big enough, I don’t need something bigger, I don’t need any singer.” And I don’t blame him. But Horner says, “I’m not going to tell you who sang the song. Just please give me a favor and listen just one time.”

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A screening of Titanic — with the song edited into the film — is arranged for Dion and Angélil with Cameron in New York.

Mottola: Most people thought, “Well, it’s too long, I’m not so sure about this.”

John Doelp (co-executive producer of Dion’s English-language albums): At the very end, James Cameron stood up and asked Céline, “How did you feel about the movie?” Céline held up her Kleenex. And it was completely tattered, because she’d been crying so much.

Franglen: I don’t think Jim has ever been someone who needs other people’s ­opinion. But I know that he personally got the song. He felt like it gave a resonance to the rest of the movie.

Landau: The movie had a punch ­[without the song]. What it did not have was something you could take home with you. They found an organic way to weave “My Heart Will Go On” in. It’s just a continuation of the epilogue of the film.

Billy Zane (actor, Titanic): The big night for me was the premiere at the Chinese [Theater]. The song just delivered. People were reduced to jelly. The most stoic and stalwart pillars of the industry... they were beside themselves. When she hits the high note in “Near, far, wherever you are” — bam! The floodgates open.

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The Road to the Grammy Awards

There were two versions of “My Heart Will Go On”: one that appears at the end of the film and a more produced pop single for radio that won the Grammy for record of the year in 1999.

Billie Woodruff (director of the music video): Céline’s marketing person reached out to me because Céline, I think, loved the stuff I’d done with Toni Braxton. So I went out to Paramount. James was still finishing the film. And the people at the studio were like, “It’s going to be a ­disaster.” I remember sitting there ­thinking, “I can’t believe they’re saying this to me.” I watched the movie, and I’m crying at the end!

I hopped on a plane to Las Vegas to meet Céline. I was nervous. She opened the door, and I’m like, “Hey, I’m Bille.” And she started singing “Billie Jean” by Michael Jackson. She made me ­comfortable immediately.

Walter Afanasieff (co-producer, “My Heart Will Go On”): I’ve never said this before, but I never met James Horner until we stood onstage together at the Grammys. I came into the process from the first point that they decided to make a big radio single. There was no version existing except for a tiny little piano vocal demo that Céline had done with Horner. To be very honest, I didn’t really get it. I thought it was a very simple song that just meandered. It was a little dreary. Epic Records called me and said, “Well, do what you can.”

I arranged and produced it. Céline did her vocals with me. She did one take on the demo that you hear in the movie. But whenever you’re talking about the big single — which is what’s on her album, the song that won the Grammy Award for record of the year — that’s what we’re ­talking about. I can’t agree to all of these other cockamamie, one-take stories.

Doelp: No. We were making the record [Let’s Talk About Love] in New York. Walter was working out of his place. The vocal was great. And from Céline’s ­standpoint, she wouldn’t sing it again if it was [already] great.

Mottola: If Walter says that, then I believe that. Walter would remember.

Dion: I don’t remember. It went so fast.

Afanasieff: I produced and recorded from scratch — the orchestra, the ­timpani rolls, the background vocals, the ­guitar solo, the giant drums. Then, all of a ­sudden, at the end of the process the label instructed me to accept [Horner’s] name next to mine as co-producer. And I went a little bit sideways on that. I had no idea why someone who has never stepped foot in the studio with me would be my co-producer. I don’t wish to speak ill of someone who passed away, but that was a very hard pill to swallow.

Mottola: Walter is a brilliant, brilliant producer. And his version really propelled that record. But James Horner had creative license and came up with ideas and parts of the arrangements, and, you know, Walter embellished and redid.

Woodruff: We shot the video in Los Angeles over two days. Céline was so open. She’s like, “You want to talk about my hair? Come on the trailer.” She has no walls up. Céline never said, “How many takes?” There was a point I was shooting her for so long, she was standing there singing and she fell asleep standing up!

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Teeing Up a Hit

Mottola: [“My Heart Will Go On”] had a slow start. It was Christmastime; programmers, stations were locked up. The song was released six weeks before the movie. Come January the picture comes out. It was like throwing gasoline on a bonfire. It exploded the song.

Carl Wilson (critic and author of Let’s Talk About Love: A Journey to the End of Taste): It has such a particular ­powerhouse quality that invades your head. The pennywhistle is definitely a piercing announcement that “My Heart Will Go On” is now playing. And then the song is one extended climax. You think it can’t get any bigger. But it just keeps getting bigger.

Zane: I was at Harrods in England, descending the escalator to the Egyptian-themed bowels. And the song was playing quite loudly. I was being recognized on the descent. I felt like Norma Desmond ­coming down the staircase.​

Brunman: A little-recognized ­accomplishment of “My Heart Will Go On” is how many Titanic movie tickets it sold. Long after the enormous worldwide ­marketing campaigns of Paramount and Fox had spent their last advertising dollars, the continuing airplay and video play for “My Heart Will Go On” acted as a constant reminder to go see the movie again.

Mottola: It was a song that propelled by now almost a billion dollars in [music] sales. Céline is a very gracious, ­generous person. And has done nothing but be thankful. Unlike many [artists].

Image

The Legacy

Dion: They told me, “You know that Kate Winslet said every time she hears the song, she wants to throw up?” And I answered, “Thank God she didn’t have to sing it!”

Landau: I’ve spoken to Kate about this. Her comment was not about the song -- it was the idea that when she would walk into a restaurant, they would start to play it. She couldn’t get away from it.

Zane: You hear it at karaoke, drifting in from neighboring booths in Farsi. And it feels like all is right in the kingdom. The song is an easy target for postmodern ­millennial hipster angst. Why? Because it’s sincere? It’s the rarest of things: It’s quality. I would like to hear more power ballads. More power ballads, I say!

Afanasieff: You get to a point where you’re sick of it. Years and years, nobody played that song. People were so over it. But I wish this song another 2 million years on earth, that people will go, “It’s one of the greatest songs of all time.”
Wilson: I love all of the mall punk ­covers. New Found Glory is the best known. There is a scene in Gilmore Girls where it is just played wordlessly, on an acoustic guitar, at the funeral of a chow chow. It actually becomes emotionally affecting in that context.

Franglen: I was working with a Mongolian band north of Beijing, and someone said, “He produced ‘My Heart Will Go On!’ ” At which point I got presented with a Chinese version of it. It was very nice to win record of the year. And I’m very pleased with the royalties. But I’m proud of it because it means ­something to an awful lot of people.

Dion: Every night [in Vegas] I’m like, “Oh, gosh, I’m not going to sing that song again.” And then that curtain opens and the smoke starts and people are ­crying. Every night when I start to sing that song, I think, “Gee, what a song. What a moment.” I’m so thankful that they did not listen to me. I said, “No way, José. At the end of the day, I’m the one that sings it and sells it. I’m not doing that.” I’m so glad that my husband said, “I really think that you should do that song.”

http://www.billboard.com/articles/news/ ... -interview
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Postby RockTheBoat » Sun Nov 19, 2017 3:38 pm

Thanks for posting that Wayne, very interesting read!
Without Any Meaning / We're Just Skin & Bone / Like Beautiful Robots Dancing Alone.
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Postby MusicLover88 » Sun Nov 19, 2017 4:19 pm

Wayne wrote:
menime123 wrote:I live so much for the vocal introduction she includes in live performances.
You mean what she does in this?



If so, yessss - angelic!
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Postby BlueScorpion » Sun Nov 19, 2017 4:27 pm

00:18 it seems like she's thinking: "OK here I go singing this f*cking song again :roll:" :lol:

OMG at that intro :o seems like she's swallowed the instrumental tape!!
You ain't gotta break down,
YOU'RE TOO STRONG!"
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Postby CelinetoBarbra » Sun Nov 19, 2017 5:55 pm

Best-selling single outside US by female!
BARBRA
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Postby Fan » Sun Nov 19, 2017 7:26 pm

It's ofcourse an iconic song and I love it quite a lot (it's no It's All Coming Back To Me Now though), but it does feel more like a guilty pleasure than an actual good song.

I have great memories of this song during the Pride in Amsterdam last year. One of the boats played this and the whole crowd starting singing a-long. It was a lovely moment.
i wanna see you on your knees, wanna see you begging
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