Britney Spears

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As we celebrate Blackout's 10th anniversary, what are your own THREE favourite tracks?

1. Gimme More
38
26%
2. Piece of me
23
16%
3. Radar
6
4%
4. Break the ice
21
14%
5. Heaven on earth
3
2%
6. Get naked (I got a plan)
21
14%
7. Freakshow
6
4%
8. Toy soldier
6
4%
9. Hot as ice
5
3%
10. Ooh ooh baby
2
1%
11. Perfect lover
1
1%
12. Why should I be sad?
6
4%
13. Outta this world
3
2%
14. Get back
3
2%
15. Everybody
2
1%
 
Total votes : 146

Postby MrLeonix » Fri Oct 27, 2017 11:51 am

DAZED: Britney’s Blackout ten years on – a mutant pop classic

How the superstar overcame very public controversies and proved her critics wrong with one of the most inventive pop records in recent history

On September 9, 2007, Britney Spears was supposed to make a triumphant return to the MTV VMAs stage. After a couple of years of controversy – an impromptu 55-hour marriage to her childhood sweetheart and its subsequent annulment, accusations of out-of-control partying and erratic behaviour by the tabloids and blossoming online celebrity gossip rags like TMZ, and the infamous head-shaving debacle – this was the moment that Britney, an artist who epitomised the last decade of pop culture, would show that she was still the greatest entertainer of a generation. What actually occurred during her debut performance of the grungy and pulsating “Gimme More” would, however, later be described by the New York Times as an “inept pantomime” and by the BBC as “one of the worst (performances) to grace the MTV Awards”.

While it might be tired to preface any discussion of Britney Spears’ fifth album, Blackout, by dredging up this now iconically disastrous performance and the media rabidity surrounding the pop star herself, it’s important to frame the album in the context of the public’s expectations. According to the tabloids, professional celebrity troll Perez Hilton and the newly founded TMZ, Britney was a mess – no way could someone inhabiting an unprecedented and chaotic paparazzi and media circus produce work of any merit, especially someone who, according to some, was just another manufactured marionette. It is perhaps one of pop music’s greatest justices, then, that Blackout **** bangs.

In 2006, amid the birth of her second son and her divorce from Kevin Federline, Britney’s rep’s confirmed that she was officially working on what would become Blackout. Reports by MTV spoke about how a heavily pregnant Britney was working with people like J.R. Rotem and Timbaland protégé Danja (who in turn brought in his own group of collaborators who would end up making up most of the bulk of those who worked in the album). In a recent comment to The FADER, Britney described the process of making the album as “simple”. “I just did what I felt and it worked. Sometimes less is more I guess,” she said. And from the sounds of things, the journey to create a cohesive and forward thinking album was exactly that. Danja, who co-wrote and produced lead single “Gimme More” as well as six other songs on the album, has repeatedly said how Britney would leave his team to work on concepts before coming in to record what she felt worked. “If (Britney) felt it, she was gonna ride with it,” he told Rhapsody in 2008. “If she didn't, you’d see it in her face.”

On the surface, it might not sound like Britney was the most hands on, but what many people don’t know about Blackout is that, for the first and only time in her career, Britney took on the role of executive producer for the record; her public life might have been unmanageable, but when it came to her work, Britney was the boss. So, like an expert curator, she shaped and plotted the album with her deftness for pop music. Flooding the record with studio trickery and electronics – from Danja’s fusion of hip hop and house music to Bloodshy and Avant’s amalgamation of Scandinavian pop sensibilities and underground European dance experimentation – she picked producers who were plucking at genres and melding them together to create a Frankenstein musical behemoth threaded together by Britney’s idiosyncratic vocal touches. As her A&R, Teresa LaBarbera Whites, said at the time, “It’s her magic that turns these songs into what they are.”

However, this disparity between the personal and the professional was just another excuse for critics to comment on Britney’s transformation from pop provocateur to pop robot and vocally, Blackout sees the singer’s voice treated, chopped, spliced and mutated in new and sometimes alarming ways, her whispery southern drawl either coalescing with the throbbing electronic production or pitched unnaturally. Yet, from song leaks it’s clear that the album could have pivoted in another direction. Among leaked demos for songs like “Hot As Ice” (originally titled “Cold As Fire”) and “Perfect Lover” (originally called “Got Me High”) were stripped back tracks like The Crown Heights Affair sampling “Baby Boy” and “Let Go”, both of which are unlike anything you’ll have heard from Britney before. Singing in her (naturally) lower register, the songs highlight her vulnerability as a vocalist as well as her talent as a songwriter. They’re rare peeks at portraits of one of pop’s most enigmatic artists and perhaps always intended to remain unfinished sketches.

“Britney Spears once lamented that she wasn’t a girl but not yet a woman... Blackout was the signal that this transition had reached its climax. Yet rather than emerging as a Stepford pop princess, the Britney that appeared was disruptive and peddling demented pop music”.

Nevertheless, it’s to the benefit of Blackout’s legacy that this rawness was all but excluded. Keri Hilson, who co-wrote singles “Gimme More” and “Break The Ice”, said that those involved were told explicitly that the songs submitted shouldn’t represent what was going on for Britney personally. Instead, she told The FADER, they created a “fantasy world that she would be happy in”. Clearly it’s this escapism that permitted Britney to head straight from filing divorce from her husband to the studio to record “Radar”, as recounted by producers The Clutch. On the few moments where we are permitted a glimpse into Britney’s life, she forgoes syrupy balladry for snarling fury on the crunchy “Piece Of Me” and brazen detachment on the dissonant Pharrell Williams produced “Why Should I Be Sad”.

It’s these subversions of expectations that are the album’s smoking gun. From the assertive declaration of “It’s Britney, bitch”, Blackout is an unrelenting venture to push pop’s envelope. Given her now tarnished media image, the Britney of yesteryear – the one all tied up with conservative coquettishness – could no longer perform as America’s perpetual virgin. Rather among the implacable glare of the paparazzi, Britney emerged possessed by a demonic explicitness to dismantle any assumptions about her life, career or music. 2003’s often overlooked In The Zone, which spawned career-defining hits like “Toxic” and “Everytime”, might have laid the musical groundwork for Britney to push herself, but Blackout was the moment she arrived – as she whispers at the beginning of “Break The Ice”: “It’s been a while. I know I should have kept you waiting, but I’m here now.”

Given that the media frenzy surrounding Britney would continue well into what should have been Blackout’s reign of supremacy, the album was the singer’s first to not arrive at Number 1 on the Billboard album chart. Circus, which arrived 12 months later, was a more commercial but conservative effort devoid of its predecessor’s nihilism. And although glimmers of Blackout’s darkness have lingered, the MO for the next few years was to show that Britney Spears, a divorced mother of two, was still the poster girl for America’s contradicting obsession with chastity and provocation. Really, it wasn’t until 2011’s Femme Fatale – which nestled commercially pulsing EDM of “Till The World Ends” with outlandish panpipes of “Criminal” and the skittish “How I Roll” – and later 2016’s Glory – with its mesh of trop-pop with the weirdly frenetic hyper-pop on songs like “If I’m Dancing” and the ominous and melancholic electro on French language “Coupure Électrique” (which, as it happens, translates to “power cut” or “blackout”) – that carried on Britney’s penchant for colouring out of pop’s presumptuous box.

If Britney Spears once lamented that she wasn’t a girl but not yet a woman, then Blackout was the signal that this transition had reached its climax. Yet rather than emerging as a Stepford pop princess, the Britney that appeared was disruptive and peddling demented pop music that, unlike similar records by Justin Timberlake and Nelly Furtado, wasn’t the result of meticulous planning. Rather it was the result of a hazardous moment in pop culture history that saw a serendipitous and symbiotic relationship between an artist eroding her past and producers forging their future that payed off. It’s a result that often sees Blackout being cited as one of the most influential albums of the last decade for the way it suffused hip hop, pop, R&B and EDM. But more importantly, Blackout was the record that forevermore proved that Britney Spears’ career was way more than just an “inept pantomime”; she might be one of its biggest provocateurs, but she’s also one of pop’s most important pioneers.
Source: http://www.dazeddigital.com/music/artic ... rospective
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Postby MarlonBS » Fri Oct 27, 2017 4:03 pm

Top 3:
Piece of Me
Perfect Lover
Why Should I Be Sad?
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Postby BlueScorpion » Fri Oct 27, 2017 7:06 pm

‘Blackout’ Photographer Ellen von Unwerth Shares New Godney Outtake

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Postby MrLeonix » Fri Oct 27, 2017 11:22 pm

^ stunning picture from the "Blackout" photoshoot.
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Postby BlueScorpion » Fri Oct 27, 2017 11:57 pm

Very Madonnish!
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Postby MrLeonix » Sat Oct 28, 2017 12:11 am

The articles just keep going. I'm really glad to see all of this appreciation, I honestly feel "Blackout" deserves all of this.

Huffingtonspot UK: Britney Spears Blackout: 10 Years On

This week marks the tenth anniversary of the release of Britney Spears' fifth studio album, 'Blackout'. An album that, at the time, seemed a near impossibility. Following a year of divorce, rehab and that hair-shaving incident, unexpectedly, what would emerge was a set of work that helped shape the sound of the pop landscape for years to come.

In a year where Spears' meltdown played out in front of baying paparazzi, it all made for uncomfortable viewing, and an uneasy fear that it all wasn't going to end well. A seemingly unending appetite for her antics allowed the internet to turn her into some kind of clown, turning her personal troubles into a soap opera. It's no coincidence that 2007 was also the year that 'Keeping Up With The Kardashians' debuted.

The messy canvas of Spears' personal life didn't lend itself to the traditional blueprint of anticipation and fan excitement that precedes an album release. By putting 'Blackout' on global music release schedules Spears' label found a way to channel the confused energy that radiated from the superstar into an album that nobody saw coming.

If the cynics were prepping to give this new album a critical drumming, they were beyond disappointed. The production work of Danja and Bloodshy & Avant ensured an assault of bold sounds and dance influences that helped Britney's vocals rise to the occasion. On 'Blackout', if it wasn't already clear from her tabloid antics, Spears had fully moved on from her bubblegum past and was taking her loyal fan base with her, poking an ironic stick at her less than ideal life on 'Piece Of Me.'

This was never going to be an album that Spears would flog around the world on a promo trip. She was never going to announce a tour, and it all came close to going down the toilet when she performed first single, 'Gimme More', at the MTV VMAs just weeks before the album's release. The one-time princess of the MTV stage turned in a car crash of a show that should still come with a warning for any repeat viewing.

Blackout marked a notable shift from the familiar pop sounds that had dominated the first half of the decade, allowing a new era of electropop and dubstep to dawn on radio. The immediate influences were apparent with the arrival of Lady GaGa's 'Just Dance' one year later and were still impacting with Taylor Swift's 'I Knew You Were Trouble' in 2012. It's a sound that Spears herself has also revisted with her singles 'Hold it Against Me' and 'Work Bitch.'

Ten years later, as Spears continues to enjoy the routine of her Vegas residency, the pitfalls of 2007 seem a distant memory. The odd reminder comes courtesy of the popular meme: 'If Britney survived 2007, then you can make it through today.' For a reminder of how 'Blackout' still holds up, then give the tracks 'Get Naked' and 'Hot As Ice' an outing and admire how far she'd come, so soon after picking up those hair trimmers.
Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/alex-ja ... 64906.html
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Postby ThaInfo1 » Sat Oct 28, 2017 5:57 am

Outta This World is lovely.
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Postby Instinct » Sat Oct 28, 2017 7:17 am

MrLeonix wrote:The articles just keep going. I'm really glad to see all of this appreciation, I honestly feel "Blackout" deserves all of this.

Huffingtonspot UK: Britney Spears Blackout: 10 Years On

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/alex-ja ... 64906.html
I'm really glad these articles are acknowledging the impact "Blackout" had on pop music. Britney fans have been saying this for years but people are quick to try to discredit her.
Blackout marked a notable shift from the familiar pop sounds that had dominated the first half of the decade, allowing a new era of electropop and dubstep to dawn on radio. The immediate influences were apparent with the arrival of Lady GaGa's 'Just Dance' one year later and were still impacting with Taylor Swift's 'I Knew You Were Trouble' in 2012.
8-)

MrLeonix wrote:DAZED: Britney’s Blackout ten years on – a mutant pop classic

How the superstar overcame very public controversies and proved her critics wrong with one of the most inventive pop records in recent history

Source: http://www.dazeddigital.com/music/artic ... rospective
This was a really nice read. One of the best articles I've seen thus far. And I love how they skipped "Britney Jean" and went straight from "Femme Fatale" to "Glory", as it should be. :P

Really, it wasn’t until 2011’s Femme Fatale – which nestled commercially pulsing EDM of “Till The World Ends” with outlandish panpipes of “Criminal” and the skittish “How I Roll” – and later 2016’s Glory – with its mesh of trop-pop with the weirdly frenetic hyper-pop on songs like “If I’m Dancing” and the ominous and melancholic electro on French language “Coupure Électrique” (which, as it happens, translates to “power cut” or “blackout”) – that carried on Britney’s penchant for colouring out of pop’s presumptuous box.
---
Billboard, Dazed, Noisey, HuffingtonPost, Attitude, E! News, Bustle, Idolator, MTV, Spotify and Out have posted about it so far. Hopefully Rolling Stone will follow on the 30th, since they've been praising the album from day 1. :)
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Postby Instinct » Sat Oct 28, 2017 7:24 am

I'm loving all the "Outta This World" love in here. It's such an underrated track and imo one of Britney's finest. The production is so dreamy and I love the way her voice sounds. 8-) Wish it was available for streaming.
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Postby MrLeonix » Sat Oct 28, 2017 11:41 am

Instinct wrote:Billboard, Dazed, Noisey, HuffingtonPost, Attitude, E! News, Bustle, Idolator, MTV, Spotify and Out have posted about it so far. Hopefully Rolling Stone will follow on the 30th, since they've been praising the album from day 1. :)
... UK Charts Company, The Fader, and NRJ France have also posted about it.

The fact that the current three main music industry driving forces (Billboard, Spotify, and UK Charts Company) aknowledged and recognized its impact just speaks volumes.
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Postby MrLeonix » Mon Oct 30, 2017 9:15 pm

The praise for "Blackout" just keeps going, this time from a major music publication!

ROLLING STONE: Britney Spears' 'Blackout': A Salute to Her Misunderstood Punk Masterpiece

Miraculously made during Spears' very public meltdown, LP is her greatest, and one of the most innovative, influential pop albums of past decade

"Nobody has ever been able to explain how Blackout happened – how a star in mid-meltdown managed to document it all so vividly,"

Happy tenth birthday to Blackout, which is not only the greatest of all Britney Spears albums, but one of the most innovative and influential pop albums of the past decade. It's where America's sweetheart changed her name to Mrs. Oh My God That Britney's Shameless and got real, real dark on us. On Tuesday, October 30th, 2007, when the world was trying to write her off as a joke – not for the first time, not for the last – Brit dropped music way too weird for the radio, all alien and distorted, warping her Southern drawl into a surly electro-punk sneer. Within a couple of years, everybody was trying to sound like this. It's Britney, bitch.

She was a pop princess. Now she's in and out of hospitals, rehab, and court. How Britney lost it all
Blackout is an avant-disco concept album about getting famous, not giving a ****, getting divorced, not giving a ****, getting publicly mocked and despised and humiliated. It's an album about dancing on tables in a cloud of glitter and Cheeto dust. But mostly it's an album about not giving a ****, which is why it sounds perfect for grim times like these. Especially since America in 2017 is less sane or stable than Britney was in 2007. If our girl could emerge from the wreckage with an album like Blackout, there's hope for us all.

Every now and then, a pop queen delivers a masterpiece that stops in the world in its tracks and commands respect. Blackout was not one of these masterpieces. It got widely dismissed as a career-ending flop, in the wake of her disastrous performance of "Gimme More" on the MTV Video Music Awards, stumbling through her dance moves, giving up halfway through. People decided Blackout was a pitiful crash-and-burn from a has-been skin job.

Yeah, well, people were pretty stupid in 2007. If you require proof, just Google "Audrina and Justin Bobby." ("Homeboy wore combat boots to the beach" was the "homeboy is gonna like get it" of its time.) Blackout is where Britney vents all her raging party-girl hostility, from the way she snarls "I'm Miss American dream since I was 17" in "Piece of Me" to the way she spits "stupid freaking things" in "Why Should I Be Sad." No wonder the radio got scared away–this is her version of Lou Reed's nihilistic noise opus Metal Machine Music. We'll never know if Lou listened to it, but surely he would have admired a statement like "Get Naked (I Got A Plan)."

Nobody has ever been able to explain how Blackout happened – how a star in mid-meltdown managed to document it all so vividly. It's not like anybody sat down and decided to make a great album, least of all the artist herself – out of twelve tracks, the only two she had a hand in writing were "Freakshow" and "Ooh Baby Baby." There was no production mastermind pulling strings behind the scenes. Blackout had an all-star team of circa-2007 hitmakers: Danja, Jim Beanz, T-Pain, Bloodshy & Avant, Freescha, Fredwreck, Henri Jonback, the Neptunes, the Clutch. Yet they all outdid themselves. Sonically, the abrasive robo-screech was years ahead of its time. It's almost as if the producers and writers were using Blackout as a beta test, trying out their craziest ideas on the assumption that the album would bomb and nobody would listen.

At first, it looked like they were right. In the parlance of 2007, Britney was "not in a good place." She was all over the tabloids for head-shaving and windshield-smashing. A kid in Tennessee became a YouTube star for sobbing, "Leave Britney alone!" Her marriage to Kevin Federline barely outlasted her first (which clocked in at 55 hours), leaving Brit with two babies and a warehouse full of unsold Britney and Kevin: Chaotic DVDs.

Her high-profile VMAs gig in September was eagerly awaited as her comeback – until about two seconds after she stepped onstage. She could barely move. Live-blogging for Rolling Stone that night, I'd saved up all my superlatives for the queen's conquering moment. Instead, I spent four minutes trading "how is this happening" texts with my editor. As I typed sadly at 9:06 p.m., "Oh, Britney. That was not a not-terrible idea." Just a few weeks later, Jay-Z dropped the single "Roc Boys," boasting that his drugs "got less steps than Britney / That means it ain't stepped on, dig me?" Never one to hold a grudge, Brit posted a Jay-Z song on Instagram last month: "When this song came out, I lost my mind like a little kid!!! I fangirled and cried!!" And of course, Jay went to see her Vegas show in 2015, because that's what you do when Beyonce runs the world.

By the time Blackout came out in October, everybody figured Brit was over. "Gimme More" reached Number Three on career momentum, but it stopped the other singles cold; "Piece of Me" stalled at Number Eighteen while "Break The Ice" missed the Top Forty. If you were in NYC for Halloween 2007, you probably remember the streets were crawling with Britneys serving the "Gimme More" lewk; half the ladies on the L train that night kept screaming "It's Britney, bitch!" (The other half were Amy Winehouse. That was quite a Halloween.)

But it's ironic that of all the turmoil Britney went through in 2007, the one thing people remember today, the thing that turned out to be lasting, is the music. As the lady once sang, she's got nine lives like a kitty cat. The trilogy of Blackout, Circus and Femme Fatale is the summit of Britdom; in so many ways, it's comparable to Bowie's Berlin trilogy, with its electric-blue Euro-haze ambience, as well as the angst of a damaged fame junkie who's always crashing in the same car. Pop artists keep building whole careers on the Blackout sound – just to pick the most stellar example, Selena Gomez's "Bad Liar" is the best Britney song of 2017, just as "Hands To Myself" and "Slow Down" were the best of 2015 and 2013 respectively.

"Piece of Me" is the peak of the album – and maybe Britney's career – produced by the Swedish duo Bloodshy & Avant, who also did "Radar," "Toy Soldier" and "Freakshow," not to mention the 2003 classic "Toxic." Miss American Dream Since She Was 17 lists all the ways the TRL dream turned into her nightmare, so she punishes America by making us live it out with her. "You wanna piece of me?" sounds like she's either pimping herself out or taunting you into a bar brawl. Either way, it'll cost you. No wonder Taylor Swift quotes this song ("another day, another drama") in "Look What You Made Me Do." "Piece of Me" remains the template for every pop girl who decides it's time to wreak her evil vengeance on a world that made the fatal mistake of pissing her off. Are you sure you want a piece of Britney? After ten years, Blackout still makes that sound like a thrillingly dangerous question.
Source: http://www.rollingstone.com//music/news ... ce-w510038
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Postby menime123 » Mon Oct 30, 2017 9:18 pm

I’ve never understood why POM was considered the album highlight to be honest. It’s good, but not amazing.
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Postby MrLeonix » Mon Oct 30, 2017 9:21 pm

menime123 wrote:I’ve never understood why POM was considered the album highlight to be honest. It’s good, but not amazing.
I think its because it pretty much sums up what "Blackout" is about. IMO POM is the song that represents the best everything that Britney was living and breathing in 2007 and it has the "don't give a f*ck" and confident attitude that defines the overall "Blackout" album. Its basically the statement on the album.
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Postby hellohello » Mon Oct 30, 2017 11:50 pm

BlueScorpion wrote:‘Blackout’ Photographer Ellen von Unwerth Shares New Godney Outtake

Image
I love how dark this album was. The music, the look, the production. I love everything about it.
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Postby Instinct » Tue Oct 31, 2017 6:34 am

Glad Rolling Stone posted about it 8-) Wow, so many articles and so much praise for this album. I was expecting a couple of articles but definitely not this many. Billboard, Rolling Stone, Official Charts Company, Spotify, MTV UK, The Fader, Dazed, Noisey, HuffingtonPost, Attitude, E! News, Bustle, Idolator, Out Magazine and NRJ France have all given the album the praise it deserves.

The myth that Britney doesn't have any important/influential albums can be put to rest now. :wink: This week has been great for "Blackout".

Happy tenth birthday to Blackout, which is not only the greatest of all Britney Spears albums, but one of the most innovative and influential pop albums of the past decade.
Pop artists keep building whole careers on the Blackout sound – just to pick the most stellar example, Selena Gomez's "Bad Liar" is the best Britney song of 2017, just as "Hands To Myself" and "Slow Down" were the best of 2015 and 2013 respectively.
Love these bits. :D

PS: "Piece of Me" is brilliant. I can definitely see why some consider it a career/album highlight. It has the best lyrics of her career and amazing production.
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Postby britboyphil » Tue Oct 31, 2017 10:52 pm

Piece Of Me is definitely the best song off Blackout. It is her most personal song. I love how those huge beats drop and the way she delivers the lines (and the mention of my country the Philippines).
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Postby mznxbcv » Wed Nov 01, 2017 1:12 am

menime123 wrote:I’ve never understood why POM was considered the album highlight to be honest. It’s good, but not amazing.
You can practically directly juxtapose one of her two most famous interviews ever, the Matt Lauer Dateline interview from 2006, and Piece of Me, released by Britney a year later.




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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u4FF6MpcsRw
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Postby BehindBreakaway » Wed Nov 01, 2017 1:47 am

Toy soldier is legit the best song she's every recorded
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Postby MusicRecords » Wed Nov 01, 2017 3:26 am

BehindBreakaway wrote:Toy soldier is legit the best song she's every recorded
Break the Ice, Toxic and And Then We Kiss say hello :P
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Postby BehindBreakaway » Wed Nov 01, 2017 3:41 am

MusicRecords wrote:
BehindBreakaway wrote:Toy soldier is legit the best song she's every recorded
Break the Ice, Toxic and And Then We Kiss say hello :P
Nahhhh toy soldier is far superior haha. The fact is was never a single breaks my cold dead heart!
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Postby MrLeonix » Wed Nov 01, 2017 2:37 pm

BehindBreakaway wrote:
MusicRecords wrote:
BehindBreakaway wrote:Toy soldier is legit the best song she's every recorded
Break the Ice, Toxic and And Then We Kiss say hello :P
Nahhhh toy soldier is far superior haha. The fact is was never a single breaks my cold dead heart!
Its interesting to see so many fans praising "Toy soldier", it's always been a fan favorite, and always considered a highlight from "Blackout" ...... On the other hand "Toy soldier" is not among my Top 5 tracks from "Blackout".

... BTW! Can you believe Britney's been dating Sam for basically a year now?

Image

They met at the "Slumber Party" music video shooting / set , I thought it was just gonna be an affair but a year later here they are.
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Postby RayRay » Wed Nov 01, 2017 8:49 pm

Can't believe I'm the only one who voted for Everybody. :o
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Postby Fabrizio » Wed Nov 01, 2017 9:18 pm

Very hard question

gimme More
break the ice
Get naked

In 4th place Radar
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Postby MrLeonix » Thu Nov 02, 2017 12:59 am

RayRay wrote:Can't believe I'm the only one who voted for Everybody. :o
I think its an even bigger crime the fact that the flawless "Ooh ooh baby" is the only song without a vote :roll:
Britney Spears . Michael Jackson . Madonna . U2 . Radiohead . Lenny Kravitz . Led Zeppelin . Daft Punk . Oasis . Eminem . Metallica . Soda Stereo
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Postby menime123 » Thu Nov 02, 2017 3:57 pm

So how long til the next album? Q4 release next year? World tour 2019? :D
Girls Aloud: Only 5 years until their 20th anniversary reunion tour! (and only 5 years until I can change my signature...)
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