Britney Spears

Moderators: biscuits, JSparksFan, stevyy, Benjamin

 

As we celebrate Blackout's 10th anniversary, what are your own THREE favourite tracks?

1. Gimme More
38
26%
2. Piece of me
23
16%
3. Radar
6
4%
4. Break the ice
21
14%
5. Heaven on earth
3
2%
6. Get naked (I got a plan)
21
14%
7. Freakshow
6
4%
8. Toy soldier
6
4%
9. Hot as ice
5
3%
10. Ooh ooh baby
2
1%
11. Perfect lover
1
1%
12. Why should I be sad?
6
4%
13. Outta this world
3
2%
14. Get back
3
2%
15. Everybody
2
1%
 
Total votes : 146

Postby MrLeonix » Sun Nov 19, 2017 11:55 pm

Instinct wrote:
mznxbcv wrote:Anyone else think that 'Criminal' is her best music video of the 2010s?

I especially liked the fact that it has a storyline.

And it was arguably the right single choice because it comfortably has the highest recurrent Vevo streams of any video off of Femme Fatale and I'm not sure 'Inside Out' would be steamed as much today even though it might have been the bigger hit in 2011.
Definitely not, but it's the best one from 2011-2012 for sure.
+1

"Criminal" is definately not her best music video from this decade, at all. But its a cool one. I think it only gets more recurrent views than the other FF music videos because it was formerly blocked on Youtube and now its unblocked so now people can watch it normally.

Every single music video from the "Femme Fatale" era had an elaborate storyline / concept, her production team was really creative back then. Many of her post FF music videos have lacked a clear concept or storyline, for example both "Scream & Shout" and "Work Bitch" music videos were about basically about nothing, they were just random scenes put together.
Britney Spears . Michael Jackson . Madonna . U2 . Radiohead . Lenny Kravitz . Led Zeppelin . Daft Punk . Oasis . Eminem . Metallica . Soda Stereo
User avatar
MrLeonix
Legend
 
Posts: 18028
Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2013

Postby BehindBreakaway » Mon Nov 20, 2017 2:23 am

MrLeonix wrote:
Instinct wrote:
mznxbcv wrote:Anyone else think that 'Criminal' is her best music video of the 2010s?

I especially liked the fact that it has a storyline.

And it was arguably the right single choice because it comfortably has the highest recurrent Vevo streams of any video off of Femme Fatale and I'm not sure 'Inside Out' would be steamed as much today even though it might have been the bigger hit in 2011.
Definitely not, but it's the best one from 2011-2012 for sure.
+1

"Criminal" is definately not her best music video from this decade, at all. But its a cool one. I think it only gets more recurrent views than the other FF music videos because it was formerly blocked on Youtube and now its unblocked so now people can watch it normally.

Every single music video from the "Femme Fatale" era had an elaborate storyline / concept, her production team was really creative back then. Many of her post FF music videos have lacked a clear concept or storyline, for example both "Scream & Shout" and "Work Bitch" music videos were about basically about nothing, they were just random scenes put together.
I won't hear a bad thing said about the work bitch video!! Lol
3 months and I'm still sober, picked all my weeds but kept the flowers!
User avatar
BehindBreakaway
Personal Assistant
 
Posts: 832
Joined: Tue Nov 01, 2016

Postby JSparksFan » Mon Nov 20, 2017 2:31 am

I think "Slumber Party" was her best video since "I Wanna Go". "Criminal" has a good video, but it isn't amazing.
"Love yourself so that love will not be a stranger when it comes, and it will come."

Akini's Top 100 Songs of 2017: [55-51]
User avatar
JSparksFan
Legend
 
Posts: 44952
Joined: Fri Jul 24, 2009
Location: Bahamas

Postby MrLeonix » Mon Nov 20, 2017 2:32 am

BehindBreakaway wrote:I won't hear a bad thing said about the work bitch video!! Lol
I think its a really good and solid video , I just think it doesn't have a storyline, thats all.

BTW, Britney was shown during the American Music Awards intro video, they were showing the most impactful artists and icons through every decade (70s, 80s, 90s, 00s, 10s), they showed icons like Madonna, Whitney, etc and as soon as 2000s appeares they showed Britney 8-)
Britney Spears . Michael Jackson . Madonna . U2 . Radiohead . Lenny Kravitz . Led Zeppelin . Daft Punk . Oasis . Eminem . Metallica . Soda Stereo
User avatar
MrLeonix
Legend
 
Posts: 18028
Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2013

Postby MrLeonix » Mon Nov 20, 2017 9:37 pm

FORBES: Britney Spears ranks as the 8th highest paid female musician of the year

In order to form our list, we looked at pretax income from June 1, 2016 through June 1, 2017, and did not take out fees charged by agents, managers and lawyers. We gathered data from Nielsen SoundScan, Pollstar, the RIAA and interviews with industry insiders. The two mononymous stars both earned tens of millions more than the rest of the pack, but there are plenty of notable names further down the list.
*The covered period was June 1, 2016 - June 1, 2017. So this income doesn't include Her Summer Asian Tour (The Tour started on June 3 - the tour will count for next year's Forbes edition).

01. Beyonce - $105 million
02. Adele - $69 million
03. Taylor Swift - $44 million
04. Celine Dion - $42 million
05. Jennifer Lopez - $38 million
06. Dolly Parton - $37 milliion
07. Rihanna - $36 million
08. Britney Spears - $34 million
09. Katy Perry - $33 million
10. Barbra Streisand - $30 million

Source: https://www.forbes.com/sites/zackomalle ... 8ac0a4e15a

-

Britney always maintains herself as one of the Top 10 highest paid female musicians in the business and the "Glory" era was not the exception.
Britney Spears . Michael Jackson . Madonna . U2 . Radiohead . Lenny Kravitz . Led Zeppelin . Daft Punk . Oasis . Eminem . Metallica . Soda Stereo
User avatar
MrLeonix
Legend
 
Posts: 18028
Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2013

Postby MrLeonix » Tue Nov 21, 2017 7:01 pm

BILLBOARD picks "How I roll" as one of the 10 best deep cuts from the 21st century by Pop stars

Image
Image

In a musical world like pop, where the genre's very name puts the emphasis on popularity, the deep cut is always at risk of being overlooked. For the world's biggest pop stars, the hit single is forever paramount, with their non-singles carrying an air of relative unworthiness.
But as any true pop stan knows, the smashes only ever tell half of an artist's story. The real stuff of cult devotion is found in the album tracks, the soundtrack and compilation contributions, the bonus tracks -- the deep cuts. Without them, the pop star is only the sum total of what the public already knows about them. With them, they become three-dimensional artists, worthy of near-worship.

To pay tribute to these lesser-celebrated gems hiding in plain sight within the pop sphere, Billboard has compiled a list of our 100 favorite deep cuts from pop stars this century. We define a deep cut as anything that wasn't released as an official single in the U.S. -- promo singles are OK, as long as they don't have an official video that's more than just a bunch of strewn-together concert footage, as are international-only singles. Songs from albums before 2000 were ineligible, though, as were ones from 2017, since there's still time for them to be tabbed as singles.

As for "pop star," that's a little trickier. We generally tried to apply our hyper-subjective Four-Song Test: As in, if you were talking to a fan who's casually paid attention to pop music this century, would you expect them to know at least four songs this century by (or featuring) the artist, without knowing whether they were actually a fan? If so, they're probably in, if not, they're most likely out. (So sorry, Carly Rae fans -- not queen of this list.) Of course, the word "pop" itself is pretty open to interpretation, and sometimes we just had to ask ourselves: Would we ever refer to this person as a pop star in conversation? (That's why Drake is on this list, for instance, but not Kendrick Lamar.)

You may or may not agree with our definition, but we think you'll agree with the songs -- buried treasures, should've-been singles, and oddball jams that show you a side of your favorite superstar that you never knew existed. Dive in to the deep end of the pop world with us.
10. Eminem, "Kill You" (The Marshall Mathers LP, 2000)
The best thing since wrestling leaned so far into his heel persona on this Marshall Mathers proper opener that he could never be upright again, toggling between rapes, murders and worse like an overzealous channel-flipper. "Now it's too late/ I'm triple platinum and tragedies happen in two states," he cackled, mostly amused at his ability to get us to take him seriously when he couldn't even keep a straight face for the song's threatening chorus ("Cause why?"). In an era with enough real-life monsters, there may not be much need for a cartoon one like Em, but the peerless wit and self-awareness on display here explain why we still pay attention to him through any number of deathly self-serious piano ballads: Bitch, he wrote "Kill You." -- A.U.

9. Britney Spears, "How I Roll" (Femme Fatale, 2011)
Femme Fatale, Britney Spears' first album of the 2010s, came at the right time, with the right sound. While singles “Till the World Ends” and “Hold It Against Me” approximated the EDM drop-oriented pop music of the moment, the buzzing, glitching and popping “How I Roll” stood out as antithetical to the rest, a precursor to the hyper-gleam of PC Music and a rebuff of the scientifically engineered precision of the day. It’s chaotic and bizarre, and remains one of the best songs she’s ever made. -- S.J.H.


8. The Weeknd, "House of Balloons / Glass Table Girls" (House of Balloons, 2011)
On his first mixtape, The Weeknd was consistently direct. This music? You should be high for it. Your desires? He’s got what you need. And even though it sounds too bleak and depraved and claustrophobic to be true, trust, this is fun for him. “House of Balloons/Glass Table Girls” runs Siouxsie and the Banshee’s “Happy House” through a funhouse mirror and the scene reflected back is warped beyond all recognition. The taste in your mouth is chemical and your skin feels different. There’s coke on every cool transparent surface in the party and you’re always going to want more. Six years later, it’s still true. -- R.S.

7. Drake, "Feel No Ways" (Views, 2016)
There's not too many songs out there that credit both Future and Anne Dudley from Art of Noise as songwriters, but that's just how goddamn good "Feel No Ways" is. A sort of spiritual sequel to "Hotline Bling" -- and it should've been just as big -- this time it's Drake that's been touching road, coming back to find his girl having moved on without him. He squeals petulantly about what's rightfully his ("You got something that belongs to me") amidst repeat accusations of such cruelty ("On purpose!"), but as on most best Drake songs, the sublime backing track gives him away -- a sentimental, electro-tinged wallow that underlines how what Drizzy's trying to say is that he feels all ways, always. -- A.U.

6. Lady Gaga, "Teeth" (The Fame Monster, 2009)
Smile! The woman who spent her third single seeking disco-stick ride admission certainly never wanted for extended sexual metaphors, so it's not surprising that what makes "Teeth" so remarkable isn't its implied carnality ("Take a bite of my bad girl meat") but the seething aggression lurking not far below the song's surface. Not that "Teeth" is a BDSM anthem, either -- it's just unequivocal in its demands, and Gaga told MTV that "Show me your teeth" is just as much a call for speaking honestly and intimately as it is for anything else mouth-related. Regardless, no pop star since She Who We Will Not Compare Gaga To had spoken so bluntly about what they wanted -- and none had sounded so badass doing the spoken-word backing vocal thing, either. -- A.U.

5. Rihanna, "Desperado" (ANTI, 2016)
Rihanna goes on the lam in this sinister, sexy ANTI vibe about the push and pull of a relationship. Whether the narrative and its myth-like “old Monte Carlo” are literal or metaphorical is up to you, and the ability to pull off both is just what makes the song so excellent. Sure, its loose, rambling structure and dramatic storyline might not fit the bill of a conventional single. But “Desperado” stands out as a brilliantly crafted mini-drama unto itself, and one that epitomizes the themes of isolation and distrust that define the 2016 album if you listen hard enough. One especially heartbreaking lyric sums it up: “There ain’t nothing here for me anymore/ But I don’t want to be alone.” -- T.C.

4. Kanye West feat. Bon Iver, "Lost in the World" (My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy, 2010)
The final proper song on Kanye West’s My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy brilliantly translates that album’s ambition into a haunting conclusion: At the end of a project about fame, power, sex and extreme wealth, there is an emptiness that our hero does not know how to fill. The collaboration with Bon Iver was radical at the time -- before Justin Vernon had a top 10 album or a Best New Artist Grammy -- but Yeezy tapping the indie-folk newcomer made sense, considering the vulnerable howl at the heart of “Lost in the World.” A few cuts removed on the track list from the self-accepting douchebag-toast of “Runaway," West is once again forcing himself to be honest about his shortcomings, this time about being “lost in this plastic life.” “World” has all the makings of a standout pop track, but as a deep cut, it speaks to the power of the project it calls home. -- J. Lipshutz

3. Taylor Swift, "All You Had to Do Was Stay" (1989, 2014)
Obviously, there’s no shame in not being picked as a single off an album with five top 10 hits. A prime 1989 deep cut is most pop artists’ lead single, and besides, “Wildest Dreams” and “Out of the Woods” have nothing on this pristine synth-pop nugget. The breakup song is certainly well-mined territory for Swift, though that simple “Stay!" -- in all its pitch-upped glory -- captures the manic desperation of a sudden split like few four-letter cries could. There’s no less than 25 stays for everyone in the stadium or the karaoke room to shout out, and the way the chorus sprawls out and lets its hook run wild -- those “had me in the palm of your hand” parts -- drives home the true lesson of "Stay": Don’t let go of a good thing, and once you’ve got it, call up Max Martin. -- C.P.

2. Justin Timberlake, "FutureSex / LoveSound" (FutureSex/LoveSounds, 2006)
It's not easy to predict what the future will sound like -- all you can really do is make music that sounds like nothing has sounded before and hope for the best. The opener and title track to Justin Timberlake's second solo album isn't totally without precedent: There's some peak Prince in there to be sure, more than a dash of "Another One Bites the Dust," sprinklings of some of Timbaland's more outré work with Aaliyah. No song had ever slithered quite like this before, though, not with this narcotic an undertow, not lorded over by a singer in such control it sounds like he's dancing flawlessly in zero gravity: "Just tell me which way you like that," JT offers, but like any good lawyer, he already knows the answer or he wouldn't be asking. Did the future of pop end up sounding like this? Of course not, and it's been a damn disappointing past decade of finding that out. -- A.U.

1. Beyoncé, "Freakum Dress" (B'day, 2006)
"When he acts up, that's when you put it on." If you thought angry Beyonce debuted on Lemonade, let us direct you to 2006 sophomore album B'Day and its standout deep cut "Freakum Dress." Opening with history's sauciest Hamlet reference ("To be or not to be – NOT") and some James Brown-worthy executive orders ("Bring the beat back – stop! I ain't ready yet"), it's a relentlessly funky ode to that one outfit you know will always turn heads… and using it as revenge against an inattentive partner. A blaring New Orleans horn section builds this pissed-off-girls-night-out anthem up to an explosive final verse where Beyonce spits her secular sermon about paying him back by looking your best -- and reminding him it's not hard to find a replacement.

For an album with six singles (if we're talking the deluxe version), it's crazy that "Freakum Dress" wasn't worked to radio. But it's also a reminder of Beyonce's sky-high standards when it comes to making albums -- something that's common knowledge now, but was hardly accepted as canon when the breakout star from Destiny's Child was on just her second album. With a three-minute album track, she introduced a new phrase to our pop culture lexicon, previewed a direction she'd fully explore a decade down the road, and reminded us that when it comes to top-tier talent, knowing the hits is never enough -- you gotta dive into their catalog Scrooge McDuck style to fully reap the bounty of their artistic riches. -- J. Lynch

-

Two other Britney tracks made the list ("Freakshow" at #60 and "Kill the lights" at #100).

Source: https://www.billboard.com/articles/colu ... m=referral
Britney Spears . Michael Jackson . Madonna . U2 . Radiohead . Lenny Kravitz . Led Zeppelin . Daft Punk . Oasis . Eminem . Metallica . Soda Stereo
User avatar
MrLeonix
Legend
 
Posts: 18028
Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2013

Postby BehindBreakaway » Tue Nov 21, 2017 8:09 pm

MrLeonix wrote:BILLBOARD picks "How I roll" as one of the 10 best deep cuts from the 21st century by Pop stars

Image
Image

In a musical world like pop, where the genre's very name puts the emphasis on popularity, the deep cut is always at risk of being overlooked. For the world's biggest pop stars, the hit single is forever paramount, with their non-singles carrying an air of relative unworthiness.
But as any true pop stan knows, the smashes only ever tell half of an artist's story. The real stuff of cult devotion is found in the album tracks, the soundtrack and compilation contributions, the bonus tracks -- the deep cuts. Without them, the pop star is only the sum total of what the public already knows about them. With them, they become three-dimensional artists, worthy of near-worship.

To pay tribute to these lesser-celebrated gems hiding in plain sight within the pop sphere, Billboard has compiled a list of our 100 favorite deep cuts from pop stars this century. We define a deep cut as anything that wasn't released as an official single in the U.S. -- promo singles are OK, as long as they don't have an official video that's more than just a bunch of strewn-together concert footage, as are international-only singles. Songs from albums before 2000 were ineligible, though, as were ones from 2017, since there's still time for them to be tabbed as singles.

As for "pop star," that's a little trickier. We generally tried to apply our hyper-subjective Four-Song Test: As in, if you were talking to a fan who's casually paid attention to pop music this century, would you expect them to know at least four songs this century by (or featuring) the artist, without knowing whether they were actually a fan? If so, they're probably in, if not, they're most likely out. (So sorry, Carly Rae fans -- not queen of this list.) Of course, the word "pop" itself is pretty open to interpretation, and sometimes we just had to ask ourselves: Would we ever refer to this person as a pop star in conversation? (That's why Drake is on this list, for instance, but not Kendrick Lamar.)

You may or may not agree with our definition, but we think you'll agree with the songs -- buried treasures, should've-been singles, and oddball jams that show you a side of your favorite superstar that you never knew existed. Dive in to the deep end of the pop world with us.
10. Eminem, "Kill You" (The Marshall Mathers LP, 2000)
The best thing since wrestling leaned so far into his heel persona on this Marshall Mathers proper opener that he could never be upright again, toggling between rapes, murders and worse like an overzealous channel-flipper. "Now it's too late/ I'm triple platinum and tragedies happen in two states," he cackled, mostly amused at his ability to get us to take him seriously when he couldn't even keep a straight face for the song's threatening chorus ("Cause why?"). In an era with enough real-life monsters, there may not be much need for a cartoon one like Em, but the peerless wit and self-awareness on display here explain why we still pay attention to him through any number of deathly self-serious piano ballads: Bitch, he wrote "Kill You." -- A.U.

9. Britney Spears, "How I Roll" (Femme Fatale, 2011)
Femme Fatale, Britney Spears' first album of the 2010s, came at the right time, with the right sound. While singles “Till the World Ends” and “Hold It Against Me” approximated the EDM drop-oriented pop music of the moment, the buzzing, glitching and popping “How I Roll” stood out as antithetical to the rest, a precursor to the hyper-gleam of PC Music and a rebuff of the scientifically engineered precision of the day. It’s chaotic and bizarre, and remains one of the best songs she’s ever made. -- S.J.H.


8. The Weeknd, "House of Balloons / Glass Table Girls" (House of Balloons, 2011)
On his first mixtape, The Weeknd was consistently direct. This music? You should be high for it. Your desires? He’s got what you need. And even though it sounds too bleak and depraved and claustrophobic to be true, trust, this is fun for him. “House of Balloons/Glass Table Girls” runs Siouxsie and the Banshee’s “Happy House” through a funhouse mirror and the scene reflected back is warped beyond all recognition. The taste in your mouth is chemical and your skin feels different. There’s coke on every cool transparent surface in the party and you’re always going to want more. Six years later, it’s still true. -- R.S.

7. Drake, "Feel No Ways" (Views, 2016)
There's not too many songs out there that credit both Future and Anne Dudley from Art of Noise as songwriters, but that's just how goddamn good "Feel No Ways" is. A sort of spiritual sequel to "Hotline Bling" -- and it should've been just as big -- this time it's Drake that's been touching road, coming back to find his girl having moved on without him. He squeals petulantly about what's rightfully his ("You got something that belongs to me") amidst repeat accusations of such cruelty ("On purpose!"), but as on most best Drake songs, the sublime backing track gives him away -- a sentimental, electro-tinged wallow that underlines how what Drizzy's trying to say is that he feels all ways, always. -- A.U.

6. Lady Gaga, "Teeth" (The Fame Monster, 2009)
Smile! The woman who spent her third single seeking disco-stick ride admission certainly never wanted for extended sexual metaphors, so it's not surprising that what makes "Teeth" so remarkable isn't its implied carnality ("Take a bite of my bad girl meat") but the seething aggression lurking not far below the song's surface. Not that "Teeth" is a BDSM anthem, either -- it's just unequivocal in its demands, and Gaga told MTV that "Show me your teeth" is just as much a call for speaking honestly and intimately as it is for anything else mouth-related. Regardless, no pop star since She Who We Will Not Compare Gaga To had spoken so bluntly about what they wanted -- and none had sounded so badass doing the spoken-word backing vocal thing, either. -- A.U.

5. Rihanna, "Desperado" (ANTI, 2016)
Rihanna goes on the lam in this sinister, sexy ANTI vibe about the push and pull of a relationship. Whether the narrative and its myth-like “old Monte Carlo” are literal or metaphorical is up to you, and the ability to pull off both is just what makes the song so excellent. Sure, its loose, rambling structure and dramatic storyline might not fit the bill of a conventional single. But “Desperado” stands out as a brilliantly crafted mini-drama unto itself, and one that epitomizes the themes of isolation and distrust that define the 2016 album if you listen hard enough. One especially heartbreaking lyric sums it up: “There ain’t nothing here for me anymore/ But I don’t want to be alone.” -- T.C.

4. Kanye West feat. Bon Iver, "Lost in the World" (My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy, 2010)
The final proper song on Kanye West’s My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy brilliantly translates that album’s ambition into a haunting conclusion: At the end of a project about fame, power, sex and extreme wealth, there is an emptiness that our hero does not know how to fill. The collaboration with Bon Iver was radical at the time -- before Justin Vernon had a top 10 album or a Best New Artist Grammy -- but Yeezy tapping the indie-folk newcomer made sense, considering the vulnerable howl at the heart of “Lost in the World.” A few cuts removed on the track list from the self-accepting douchebag-toast of “Runaway," West is once again forcing himself to be honest about his shortcomings, this time about being “lost in this plastic life.” “World” has all the makings of a standout pop track, but as a deep cut, it speaks to the power of the project it calls home. -- J. Lipshutz

3. Taylor Swift, "All You Had to Do Was Stay" (1989, 2014)
Obviously, there’s no shame in not being picked as a single off an album with five top 10 hits. A prime 1989 deep cut is most pop artists’ lead single, and besides, “Wildest Dreams” and “Out of the Woods” have nothing on this pristine synth-pop nugget. The breakup song is certainly well-mined territory for Swift, though that simple “Stay!" -- in all its pitch-upped glory -- captures the manic desperation of a sudden split like few four-letter cries could. There’s no less than 25 stays for everyone in the stadium or the karaoke room to shout out, and the way the chorus sprawls out and lets its hook run wild -- those “had me in the palm of your hand” parts -- drives home the true lesson of "Stay": Don’t let go of a good thing, and once you’ve got it, call up Max Martin. -- C.P.

2. Justin Timberlake, "FutureSex / LoveSound" (FutureSex/LoveSounds, 2006)
It's not easy to predict what the future will sound like -- all you can really do is make music that sounds like nothing has sounded before and hope for the best. The opener and title track to Justin Timberlake's second solo album isn't totally without precedent: There's some peak Prince in there to be sure, more than a dash of "Another One Bites the Dust," sprinklings of some of Timbaland's more outré work with Aaliyah. No song had ever slithered quite like this before, though, not with this narcotic an undertow, not lorded over by a singer in such control it sounds like he's dancing flawlessly in zero gravity: "Just tell me which way you like that," JT offers, but like any good lawyer, he already knows the answer or he wouldn't be asking. Did the future of pop end up sounding like this? Of course not, and it's been a damn disappointing past decade of finding that out. -- A.U.

1. Beyoncé, "Freakum Dress" (B'day, 2006)
"When he acts up, that's when you put it on." If you thought angry Beyonce debuted on Lemonade, let us direct you to 2006 sophomore album B'Day and its standout deep cut "Freakum Dress." Opening with history's sauciest Hamlet reference ("To be or not to be – NOT") and some James Brown-worthy executive orders ("Bring the beat back – stop! I ain't ready yet"), it's a relentlessly funky ode to that one outfit you know will always turn heads… and using it as revenge against an inattentive partner. A blaring New Orleans horn section builds this pissed-off-girls-night-out anthem up to an explosive final verse where Beyonce spits her secular sermon about paying him back by looking your best -- and reminding him it's not hard to find a replacement.

For an album with six singles (if we're talking the deluxe version), it's crazy that "Freakum Dress" wasn't worked to radio. But it's also a reminder of Beyonce's sky-high standards when it comes to making albums -- something that's common knowledge now, but was hardly accepted as canon when the breakout star from Destiny's Child was on just her second album. With a three-minute album track, she introduced a new phrase to our pop culture lexicon, previewed a direction she'd fully explore a decade down the road, and reminded us that when it comes to top-tier talent, knowing the hits is never enough -- you gotta dive into their catalog Scrooge McDuck style to fully reap the bounty of their artistic riches. -- J. Lynch

-

Two other Britney tracks made the list ("Freakshow" at #60 and "Kill the lights" at #100).

Source: https://www.billboard.com/articles/colu ... m=referral
I'd put kill the Lights ahead of how I roll but I'm happy enough
3 months and I'm still sober, picked all my weeds but kept the flowers!
User avatar
BehindBreakaway
Personal Assistant
 
Posts: 832
Joined: Tue Nov 01, 2016

Postby MusicRecords » Wed Nov 22, 2017 4:52 am

I want new music!
User avatar
MusicRecords
Legend
 
Posts: 10282
Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2012
Location: New York City & Vienna

Postby Instinct » Wed Nov 22, 2017 6:29 am

Those are not exactly my favorite Britney songs and I think they missed some amazing album cuts (Breathe On Me, Touch Of My Hand, Cinderella, Get Naked, Change Your Mind, etc), but I'm glad that she made it as high as #9! I've noticed that How I Roll seems to be getting a lot of praise lately. Two other articles have praised it in the past couple of months. This one in particular praised How I Roll along with If I'm Dancing and Coupure Electrique. Critics seem to appreciate her "weird", experimental tracks, which is cool to see.

Given that the media frenzy surrounding Britney would continue well into what should have been Blackout’s reign of supremacy, the album was the singer’s first to not arrive at Number 1 on the Billboard album chart. Circus, which arrived 12 months later, was a more commercial but conservative effort devoid of its predecessor’s nihilism. And although glimmers of Blackout’s darkness have lingered, the MO for the next few years was to show that Britney Spears, a divorced mother of two, was still the poster girl for America’s contradicting obsession with chastity and provocation. Really, it wasn’t until 2011’s Femme Fatale – which nestled commercially pulsing EDM of “Till The World Ends” with outlandish panpipes of “Criminal” and the skittish “How I Roll” – and later 2016’s Glory – with its mesh of trop-pop with the weirdly frenetic hyper-pop on songs like “If I’m Dancing” and the ominous and melancholic electro on French language “Coupure Électrique” (which, as it happens, translates to “power cut” or “blackout”) – that carried on Britney’s penchant for colouring out of pop’s presumptuous box.
http://www.dazeddigital.com/music/artic ... rospective

And there's this one as well

Then there’s “How I Roll.” No major pop star has released a song that sounds anything like this, before or since—the production dips and weaves, riding a bubbly loop built of strange pops, manipulated breaths, and tinny hand claps. It sounds like Aphex Twin. In the years since this song came out, forward-thinking electronic artists like PC Music have built entire careers on exploring the kind of otherworldly pop textures Spears is working with here. Charli XCX’s “Vroom Vroom” is more or less a direct descendent. She was ahead of them all.
http://www.interviewmagazine.com/music/ ... ciation/#_
User avatar
Instinct
Manager
 
Posts: 3236
Joined: Fri Dec 28, 2012

Postby Instinct » Wed Nov 22, 2017 7:04 am


8-)
User avatar
Instinct
Manager
 
Posts: 3236
Joined: Fri Dec 28, 2012

Postby MusicRecords » Wed Nov 22, 2017 7:50 am

Slay^
User avatar
MusicRecords
Legend
 
Posts: 10282
Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2012
Location: New York City & Vienna

Postby BlueScorpion » Wed Nov 22, 2017 10:14 am

If they wanted to go for Femme Fatale they could have picked Inside Out.
Still waiting for it to be released.
"Side effects be drowsiness / Loneliness / How is this? / I think they call it hateration / What can you prescribe for this?"
User avatar
BlueScorpion
Superstar
 
Posts: 5515
Joined: Sat Nov 19, 2011
Location: Europe

Postby MrLeonix » Wed Nov 22, 2017 11:46 am

Instinct wrote:Those are not exactly my favorite Britney songs and I think they missed some amazing album cuts (Breathe On Me, Touch Of My Hand, Cinderella, Get Naked, Change Your Mind, etc), but I'm glad that she made it as high as #9! I've noticed that How I Roll seems to be getting a lot of praise lately. Two other articles have praised it in the past couple of months. This one in particular praised How I Roll along with If I'm Dancing and Coupure Electrique. Critics seem to appreciate her "weird", experimental tracks, which is cool to see.

Given that the media frenzy surrounding Britney would continue well into what should have been Blackout’s reign of supremacy, the album was the singer’s first to not arrive at Number 1 on the Billboard album chart. Circus, which arrived 12 months later, was a more commercial but conservative effort devoid of its predecessor’s nihilism. And although glimmers of Blackout’s darkness have lingered, the MO for the next few years was to show that Britney Spears, a divorced mother of two, was still the poster girl for America’s contradicting obsession with chastity and provocation. Really, it wasn’t until 2011’s Femme Fatale – which nestled commercially pulsing EDM of “Till The World Ends” with outlandish panpipes of “Criminal” and the skittish “How I Roll” – and later 2016’s Glory – with its mesh of trop-pop with the weirdly frenetic hyper-pop on songs like “If I’m Dancing” and the ominous and melancholic electro on French language “Coupure Électrique” (which, as it happens, translates to “power cut” or “blackout”) – that carried on Britney’s penchant for colouring out of pop’s presumptuous box.
http://www.dazeddigital.com/music/artic ... rospective

And there's this one as well

Then there’s “How I Roll.” No major pop star has released a song that sounds anything like this, before or since—the production dips and weaves, riding a bubbly loop built of strange pops, manipulated breaths, and tinny hand claps. It sounds like Aphex Twin. In the years since this song came out, forward-thinking electronic artists like PC Music have built entire careers on exploring the kind of otherworldly pop textures Spears is working with here. Charli XCX’s “Vroom Vroom” is more or less a direct descendent. She was ahead of them all.
http://www.interviewmagazine.com/music/ ... ciation/#_
Yep, I didn't like their songs choices either, they picked "Kill the lights" instead of "Breathe on me"? .... Quite weird

But yes, "How I roll" was pretty much the acclaimed song of "Femme Fatale" I remember it was raved when the album came out and its still gaining praise over the years (3 articles for "How I roll" in the past 2 months).
Britney Spears . Michael Jackson . Madonna . U2 . Radiohead . Lenny Kravitz . Led Zeppelin . Daft Punk . Oasis . Eminem . Metallica . Soda Stereo
User avatar
MrLeonix
Legend
 
Posts: 18028
Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2013

Postby BehindBreakaway » Wed Nov 22, 2017 6:13 pm

BlueScorpion wrote:If they wanted to go for Femme Fatale they could have picked Inside Out.
Still waiting for it to be released.
YES!!!!!!!
3 months and I'm still sober, picked all my weeds but kept the flowers!
User avatar
BehindBreakaway
Personal Assistant
 
Posts: 832
Joined: Tue Nov 01, 2016

Postby Westen » Fri Nov 24, 2017 6:33 pm

My Only Wish is probably my favorite Xmas song after Last Christmas and AIWFCIY.
User avatar
Westen
Superstar
 
Posts: 9343
Joined: Tue Jun 11, 2013

Postby MusicRecords » Fri Nov 24, 2017 8:08 pm

BehindBreakaway wrote:
BlueScorpion wrote:If they wanted to go for Femme Fatale they could have picked Inside Out.
Still waiting for it to be released.
YES!!!!!!!
Yasss it’s a great song
User avatar
MusicRecords
Legend
 
Posts: 10282
Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2012
Location: New York City & Vienna

Postby Instinct » Fri Nov 24, 2017 8:15 pm

Westen wrote:My Only Wish is probably my favorite Xmas song after Last Christmas and AIWFCIY.
My Only Wish is sooo good. I wish Britney would acknowledge it somehow. It actually gets a nice amount of Spotify streams every Christmas season. :D
User avatar
Instinct
Manager
 
Posts: 3236
Joined: Fri Dec 28, 2012

Postby BehindBreakaway » Fri Nov 24, 2017 8:36 pm

Instinct wrote:
Westen wrote:My Only Wish is probably my favorite Xmas song after Last Christmas and AIWFCIY.
My Only Wish is sooo good. I wish Britney would acknowledge it somehow. It actually gets a nice amount of Spotify streams every Christmas season. :D
It's a christmas classic for me. It's always on my Christmas playlist! I want Britney to go full Christmas just once!
3 months and I'm still sober, picked all my weeds but kept the flowers!
User avatar
BehindBreakaway
Personal Assistant
 
Posts: 832
Joined: Tue Nov 01, 2016

Postby Noahh » Fri Nov 24, 2017 9:14 pm

Instinct wrote:
Westen wrote:My Only Wish is probably my favorite Xmas song after Last Christmas and AIWFCIY.
My Only Wish is sooo good. I wish Britney would acknowledge it somehow. It actually gets a nice amount of Spotify streams every Christmas season. :D
Yeah she should definitely acknowledge it more. It’s such a great Christmas song and has actually become a staple song. I hear it a lot in stores and on the radio around Christmas time.
"I got to do things my own way darling. Will you ever let me? Will you ever respect me? No!"

InstagramLast.fm
User avatar
Noahh
Legend
 
Posts: 30285
Joined: Tue Mar 02, 2010
Location: The Netherlands

Postby Instinct » Mon Nov 27, 2017 4:14 am

"Piece of Me" was released 10 years ago today!

Image

"Piece of Me" is a song recorded by American singer Britney Spears for her fifth studio album, Blackout (2007). It was released on November 27, 2007 by Jive Records as the second single from the album. The song was written and produced by Swedish producers Bloodshy & Avant and Klas Åhlund as a response to the media scrutiny and sensationalism of Spears' private life, which they had seen by working with her over the years. "Piece of Me" was the last song to be recorded for Blackout. The self-manifesto song's lyrics are written like a biography retelling her mishaps. "Piece of Me" is an electro song that runs through a down-tempo dance beat. Spears' voice is heavily synthesized, and constantly shifts in pitch. Backing vocals are provided by Bloodshy & Avant and Robyn.


-Eligible for Multi-Platinum in the USA
-#1 in Ireland
-Top 5 in Australia, Canada, Denmark, New Zealand, Scotland, UK
-Top 10 in Austria, Europe, Finland, Germany, Russia, Slovakia, Sweden
-Top 20 in Czech Republic, Italy, Switzerland, USA
-100,000,000+ views on VEVO
-Certified in Australia, Canada, Denmark, New Zealand, Sweden, UK, USA
-3,700,000 copies sold worldwide

MTV VMA Video of the Year winner
MTV VMA Best Pop Video winner
MTV VMA Best Female Video winner

Alex Fletcher of Digital Spy gave "Piece of Me" four stars, calling it "a two fingered-salute to the media hounds and an electro-thudding cry of defiance, warning us that this popstrel is not for turning. [The opening line] poops from a great height on anything Lily Allen has ever penned and reveals that it's been Spears who's been laughing hardest during her year of zany media antics". Peter Robinson of The Observer and Margeaux Watson of Entertainment Weekly named "Piece of Me" one of the standout tracks of the album. Dennis Lim of Blender called it one of the best tracks of Blackout along with "Gimme More". Laura Herbert of BBC News said that the song is "without doubt the best track on the whole album. [...] It's a masterpiece." Kelefa Sanneh of The New York Times said "[Bloodshy & Avant] evoke the horror, the exhilaration and (finally) the boredom of [Spears'] overexamined life. It’s brilliant".

Tom Ewing of Pitchfork Media suggested that "the hypertreatment of the voice, the way it edges into the music, suggests that the price of fame is identity erasure. We understand her through a filter, and that's how we have to hear her too. The multiple backing vox fragment identity further, turn the song more universal". Melissa Maerz of Rolling Stone named it the best track of the album along with "Freakshow", deeming it as a "tabloid-bashing banger". The song was later included in Rolling Stone's 100 Best Songs of 2007 at number fifteen.
Happy 10th anniversary to the iconic media-bashing anthem! "Piece of Me" was a big hit for Britney in the UK, Australia and Ireland, where it remains her highest peaking solo single in the past 10 years (even beating "Womanizer" in those countries). Additionally, it made the Top 5 in Canada, Denmark and New Zealand, peaking at #5, #4 and #4, respectively.

It only peaked at #18 in the USA due to lack of radio support (#28 on Pop) but it was a big digital hit, spending multiple weeks in the digital Top 10 and selling nearly 2 million copies without streaming (more than Hold It Against Me, Gimme More, I Wanna Go, etc) and being eligible for a Multi-Platinum certification. The song was also a big hit in Germany, spending multiple weeks inside the Top 10 and ending up was the 59th biggest hit of 2008 there.

"Piece of Me" reached 100 million views on VEVO earlier this month, becoming Britney's 13th certified video. 8-)
User avatar
Instinct
Manager
 
Posts: 3236
Joined: Fri Dec 28, 2012

Postby MusicRecords » Mon Nov 27, 2017 8:50 am

^love that song, so good!
User avatar
MusicRecords
Legend
 
Posts: 10282
Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2012
Location: New York City & Vienna

Postby MusicRecords » Mon Nov 27, 2017 8:51 am

Almost 1000 pages of Britney 8-)
User avatar
MusicRecords
Legend
 
Posts: 10282
Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2012
Location: New York City & Vienna

Postby MrLeonix » Mon Nov 27, 2017 4:46 pm

Happy 10th anniversary to "Piece of me"! , one of Britney's most emblematic singles and one of my favorite ones from her 8-)
Britney Spears . Michael Jackson . Madonna . U2 . Radiohead . Lenny Kravitz . Led Zeppelin . Daft Punk . Oasis . Eminem . Metallica . Soda Stereo
User avatar
MrLeonix
Legend
 
Posts: 18028
Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2013

Postby menime123 » Mon Nov 27, 2017 5:48 pm

I’m so excited for Vegas to end. Do we have anything concrete as to what’s coming up, or just assumptions?
Girls Aloud: Only 5 years until their 20th anniversary reunion tour! (and only 5 years until I can change my signature...)
User avatar
menime123
Superstar
 
Posts: 9339
Joined: Sun May 01, 2005

Postby BlueScorpion » Tue Nov 28, 2017 1:07 am

WORK, B*TCH!

"Side effects be drowsiness / Loneliness / How is this? / I think they call it hateration / What can you prescribe for this?"
User avatar
BlueScorpion
Superstar
 
Posts: 5515
Joined: Sat Nov 19, 2011
Location: Europe

Return to General Artists Discussion