Beyoncé

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Postby Hugo » Mon Apr 16, 2018 4:49 pm

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http://www.bbc.com/news/newsbeat-43780248

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Whether you love her or hate her, you knew – like everyone knew – that Beyoncé’s return to the music stage at Coachella was going to be show-stopping. Over the years, the pop superstar has earned the title of the greatest living entertainer. And at Coachella, she carried that title with ease. For nearly two hours, the Houston native sang and danced non-stop, and in the process treated the world to a performance that will go down in history. However, while we can continue to (rightly) praise the Grammy winner for the energy of her set, it was the combination of subtle and overt references to black culture and black womanhood that made her performance so spectacular.

First appearing on stage dressed as a Nubian Queen, the 36-year-old made it clear that her performance, like the album Lemonade, was going to intentionally centre and celebrate her identity as a black woman and the concept of black female empowerment. Dressed in a black Balmain leotard and headpiece and dripping in jewels, her costume sent a bold message. While Malcolm X may be right in that “the most disrespected, unprotected and neglected person in America is the black woman” and while the world still fails to appreciate us, Beyoncé communicated to the world that black women are royalty.

Changing out of her black Balmain ensemble and into a yellow hoodie and denim shorts, Beyonce then took us to school, but not just any school – a historic black university. While her hoodie may be easy to dismiss, like her whole performance it was a statement. The school motif on the front was made up of the Greek letters “BΔK”, or Beta Delta Kappa – the delta sign is for four, which is well-known to be her favourite number. In this, she acknowledged the black fraternities and sororities, who often take their names from three Greek letters. Yet she was also telling everyone else that she is a black woman who is now playing the world on her own terms and we are part of the Beyonce sorority. Another significant and timely statement when statistics in America and in the United Kingdom show that black women are less likely to be in positions of power when it comes to their chosen professions.

Appearing at the top of a pyramid made out of bleachers, Beyonce embarked on a “black college performance”, which comprised a marching band, steppers and majorettes. Beyonce used this aspect of black culture to disrupt Coachella’s usual indie and bohemian look and feel. For so long, white performers and festivalgoers have co-opted minority cultures, from hip hop music and style to Native American headwear, all in the name of “looking cool” for a weekend festival. Beyonce taught us all a lesson: that when it comes to performing black culture, black performers do it best.

Halfway through Beyonce’s set, she poignantly addressed her own position in history with the words: “Thank you for allowing me to be the first black woman to headline Coachella.” It was a nod to the present that heavily acknowledged the past. It is why she sang the gospel song Lift Every Voice and Sing, otherwise known as the African American anthem, and it is why she intertwined Nina Simone’s jazz classic Lilac Wine into her set. Beyonce knows the importance of acknowledging historical black musical success and those who laid the foundations for her to be the first black female performer to headline Coachella. Her gratitude was directed firmly towards those giants of the industry.

While we can applaud Beyonce’s musical choices and visuals for paying tribute to blackness, even her guests were a statement. Yes, she was joined on stage by her husband, but reuniting Destiny’s Child and having Solange, her sister, onstage was a powerful ode to black sisterhood. Black women make no secret that we are each other’s biggest champions when navigating a world of misogynoir (the specific sort of sexism and misogyny that is directed at black women). Beyonce reminded black women of the support we give each other in our biggest and most defining life moments.

When Beyonce stepped onto the Coachella stage, she seemingly had three intentions: to cement her position as the greatest entertainer of this generation, to bring black culture to the fore and to deliver a masterclass in black female empowerment. I think anyone who watched her set can agree that those intentions were transferred seamlessly into reality.

https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/be ... 07106.html
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Postby Hugo » Mon Apr 16, 2018 4:52 pm

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Where were you when Beyoncé played Coachella 2018? Maybe you had been camping out all day against the front rail, beginning to question your decision, only to then be touched by her shadow as she grinds on the catwalk during “Partition.” Maybe you were watching the live stream in your living room, shouting at the screen and clutching your friend’s shoulder as the silhouette of Destiny’s Child ascends the stage. Or maybe you found yourself barefoot in the dirt, separated from your crew, trudging uphill in a bottleneck against the current of a 100,000-person hive mind locked on Beyoncé. This is where I find myself as what is arguably the most anticipated Coachella set of all time kicks off on Saturday night.

Barefoot, alone, and with no cell service is not how I had planned to watch Beyoncé. I, like any good disciple, had spent the day conditioning for this moment—napping, hydrating, coordinating fur coats with my girls, and deep stretching while listening to Lemonade on repeat.

In the preceding hour, we are fully squadded, sipping beers and casually debating the merits of Haim as we stake out our spot in the main stage beer garden. Then, naturally, everything falls apart. Spillover from the sentient Instagram feed that is the VIP section quickly overwhelms us. We have to get out of here. I turn a corner, and the straps of my sandal liberate themselves from the sole. I’ve no option but to take my shoes off, and by the time I stand up again, the squad is fractured, somewhere adrift in the current. In the matter of minutes, I go from being Sasha Fierce to That Messy Girl at Coachella.

Then Beyoncé takes the stage. It is a moment two years in the making. She descends from atop a pyramid of lemon yellow and brass, crown atop hair perpetually windswept by the breeze that naturally conjures itself in her presence. Behind her flows a sequined cape embroidered with Nefertiti, The Great Royal Wife, Egyptian queen known for a religious revolution in which they worship one god and one god only: the sun. There are dozens of people onstage. Dancers, singers, musicians, and for the next two hours, they will play what will is arguably the greatest Coachella set of all time.

The horn flourish of “Crazy in Love” announces the queen’s arrival as I watch standing in the back of crowd that cover every patch of space in my field of vision. That’s when I realize it doesn’t matter where you are, or even who you’re with. Even if you aren’t at the main stage—even if you aren’t at Coachella—you are at Beyoncé's show.

This show really started years ago, born from life’s unplanned disruptions, when Beyoncé postponed her set due to being extremely with child—two of ’em. Any other woman, and woman of color especially, facing such a career-defining opportunity would get fired. She’d miss out. She’d be replaced. But Beyoncé made us wait for her, and with the luxury of an extra year to plan, she knew exactly what kind of opportunity she had.

“I got pregnant, thank God,” she said at the end of her set. “So I had time to dream this up.”

What she was dreaming up was the topic of much discussion and rumor in the days preceding the set. I’m told she pulled up with 33 semis in tow, hired an extra hundred dancers, restricted the coveted echelons of Guest Viewing to exclusively Her People, and had spent the week prior levitating above the Merv Griffin Estate while directing the show’s finishing touches through the telekinetic force of her third eye. Most of this proves to be true.

Beyoncé arrives in bombast, changing from her cape to jorts and a sequined yellow hoodie, fur boots, and all the good hair, wasting no time diving into highlights from Lemonade and Beyoncé. I myself am sitting on the ground, getting my shoe taped together by a guy who I later find out gave Bey and Jay a private tour of the festival grounds. It’s the closest I’ve been to Beyoncé all night. “Formation” beckons in the distance. I’m back on my feet and running.

Beyoncé is, blessedly, taking her time. Unlike her last few tours, she gracefully skips over condensed 30-second hit medleys in favor of indulging full tracks, peppering in nods to Kendrick, Sister Nancy, J Balvin, Juvenile, and Nina Simone. She’s serving up lightly chopped and screwed versions of feminine reptile brain bangers like “Formation,” “Diva,” and “Baby Boy,”—all galvanized by a fleet of dancers in lemon colored leotards, their pelvises doing all the talking. Bey penetrates us with her gaze, jumps on a crane and hovers over the crowd, then goes full dominatrix in a black vinyl leotard. The women next to me grain on that wood. I think back to earlier, when some guy friends mentioned they didn’t understand the hype about Beyonce. “Maybe it’s like what rap does for us,” one of them says, and I think there’s some truth to that. Beyonce does for the feminine other what rap does for the masculine: instills self-confidence, solidarity, and swagger for everyone historically denied those things.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie echoes over the speakers:

Women are told to make themselves smaller.
We say to girls you can have ambition but not too much.
You should aim to be successful but not too successful, otherwise you will threaten the man.
We teach girls that they cannot be sexual being in the way that boys are.

Over the next two hours, Beyoncé takes us to New Orleans (“Crazy in Love”), to America (“Lift Every Voice and Sing”), to the opera (“I Care”), to middle school (“Soulja”), to the depths of heartbreak (“Me, Myself, and I”), to the top of the charts (“Single Ladies”). It’s a cultural moment, a show for the ages that seems as meaningful to her as it is to us. She thanks us for letting her be the first black woman to headline Coachella. She thanks all the women who have opened doors so she could be here. She keeps it strictly a family affair, the only guests being her husband, her sister and the women who co-authored her rise, Kelly Rowland and Michelle Williams. It’s a reminder that music has never been about trends or genre, but where you’re from and what you’ve experienced.

In the ecstatic comedown of the hours after the show, I encounter a few others with critiques of Queen Bey. I’m told she’s too bombastic, too over-the-top; I think about the crowdmembers peeling off as the drum line continued playing with fireworks going off over the stage, a polite golf clap compared to what had just happened below. It was too much for some people; too extra. And that, like every detail of the show, was the point: You have no option but to hear her.

My anti-bombast pal tells me he prefers subtlety. But Beyoncé gives us subtlety, too—the way she moves her fingers along with the high hat in “Partition,” the slump of the dancers during Nina Simone’s version of “Strange Fruit.”

Beyoncé is often called too perfect, overly marketed, a polished product perpetually asterisked by the implicit condescension of the term pop star. “It felt too much like I was being sold something,” someone in my camp said this morning.

There’s truth in critiques of Beyoncé's capitalist feminism. But the harder truth is that the cultural reboot she stands for can only happen if it’s marketed with this glitz, swagger and scale. Beyoncé is a Tesla coil for anyone who has been otherized, (except poor Eminem, who at this point is probably just wandering apoplectic around a Safeway in Palm Desert). This isn’t Coachella going pop, this is the amplification of a voice for those who may not otherwise hear it—the kids watching the polished production online because they’re too broke to go to Coachella, the small town fans whose biggest IRL exposure to alternative ideals is Urban Outfitters, to those who can only see a person who looks remotely like them achieving something by tuning into the biggest music festival in the world. It looked and felt like a damn awards show—one for the rest of us. It was music’s biggest night.

https://noisey.vice.com/en_ca/article/g ... 018-review
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Postby Hugo » Mon Apr 16, 2018 4:53 pm

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ALEX SUSKIND April 15, 2018 AT 08:36 PM EDT
INDIO, CA. – Before she put in one of the most consequential live performances of the year (and — I feel pretty safe making this claim — of the 21st century), Beyoncé posted a brief message to her Facebook page:

I am so excited to see the BeyHive tonight at Coachella. We have been working hard and have a special show planned for you so please be safe and stay hydrated. We need your energy! There will be an hour intermission before my performance, so mark your spot, charge your phones, grab your drinks. Can’t wait to see y’all at 11:05pm!

In hindsight, this wasn’t a mild tease, it was a warning shot. By the time the 36-year-old artist finished her expansive, near-two-hour headlining set Saturday night — one that featured a full marching band and drumline, a Destiny’s Child reunion, cameos by husband Jay-Z (on “Déjà Vu”) and sister Solange (dancing along to “Get Me Bodied”), a tribute to Fela Kuti and Nina Simone, and Beyoncé herself floating high above the crowd on top of a lift while singing “Drunk in Love” — it felt like the music space-time continuum had permanently shifted.

All of it dates back to early 2017, when Bey had to cancel her Coachella headlining slot due to her pregnancy, and promised she’d be back the following year. She then spent the next few months dreaming up something a bit more audacious. The result was Beychella, a HBCU-themed musical gathering that featured updated versions of classic hits — from the slow, methodical tease of “Formation” to the chopped-and-screwed coda of “Crazy in Love” to the full spin-off of “Sorry” to the DC-backed “Soldier” and “Say My Name” — performed by Bey and a sea of musicians wearing bright yellow bejeweled hoodies. There was also a giant catwalk down the middle of the field which, to be clear, is an unusual site at a major music festival; most artists are not allowed to build custom metal structures at an event like Coachella (related: Beyoncé is not most artists).

Watching the show — both in person and via the Coachella live stream — was an exercise in multi-tasking. There were so many different things happening at once it was hard to know where to look. There were dancers krumping, tuba players bouncing up and down, violinists swaying back and forth, and Beyoncé singing and twerking and curling her way around the stage, using every inch of space she could. And it somehow still sounded good, despite being held in a setting where good sound is notoriously difficult to pin down. The horn section had depth, the snares popped, the strings hovered but weren’t overpowering, and, most importantly, Beyoncé’s voice was sharp, strong, and crystal clear.

This wasn’t a festival gig as much as a Broadway-scale production with a 70-plus-person backing band — one that displayed the pop domination of Bey while exploring the full breadth of the Black diaspora. During the set, Bey sang a cover of the Black National Anthem, “Lift Every Voice and Sing,” included snippets of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s “We Should All Be Feminists” speech, and featured brief horn-heavy cuts of C-Murder’s “Down With Them N’s” and Juvenile’s “Back That Azz Up.” Beyoncé was playing singer, soror, band director, antagonizer, dancer, and slayer of men all at once. This was a pop star 20 years into her career, at the top of her game, producing the type of concert-meets-history lesson-meets-social media explosion viewers will be talking about for years to come.

More surreal than the show itself, though, was watching people watch it in real time. Standing near me was the guy in the pink hot pants and sky-blue mesh tank screaming at the top of his lungs; the girl in long braids and black Stussy hoodie staring, mouth agape; the young girl in a shimmering jacket dancing with her mother; the thousands of bodies gyrating, two-stepping, clapping, and hollering in unison. Despite two straight days of 90-degree heat, standing in lines, eating poorly, and breathing in desert dust, they gave Queen Bey their all.

And Beyoncé returned the favor, running and singing and dancing for two hours straight with minimal breaks. Bey’s stamina knows no bounds. “Thank you for allowing me to be the first Black woman to headline Coachella,” she said at the end of the evening, to deafening applause. “I just want to say thank you, guys. I am so happy you are here… We worked real hard and I loved seeing all of your faces.”

“God, thank you,” one fan shouted back at her. It was probably not hyperbole.

http://ew.com/music/2018/04/15/beyonce- ... la-review/
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Postby Hugo » Mon Apr 16, 2018 4:55 pm

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On Saturday at Coachella, Beyoncé gave a marathon performance that involved Jay-Z, Destiny’s Child, and a marching band. Enough said. Here are Ringer staffers’ reactions to the viral concert.

1. What is your tweet-length review of her performance?
Victor Luckerson: I’ve watched historically black colleges perform Beyoncé songs at halftime for 20 years. Alabama State is still rocking to “Lose My Breath.” Bey repaid the love and magnified their bombastic jubilance to the point of sensory overload. I was a kid again, grinning in the stands.

Alyssa Bereznak: Beyoncé is already the greatest performer of our time. That she somehow outdid herself on Saturday a tribute to her inimitable imagination, ambition, determination, and generosity as an artist. I feel lucky to exist on the same planet as her.

Micah Peters: Beyoncé is the greatest living performer and I will be accepting no further submissions, thank you.

Matt James: Beyoncé’s set fired on all cylinders. Conceptually and technically, it was wildly impressive and deeply inspiring. A moment in American music, not just on Twitter. No wonder Eminem’s Sunday night headlining set wasn’t streamed. I can’t imagine a tougher act to follow.

Lindsay Zoladz: I FOUND GOD IN A HOPELESS PLACE (Coachella).

Rodger Sherman: I’ve watched a lot of YouTube videos of HBCU bands covering Beyoncé songs or doing Beyoncé-themed performances. This was like that, but featured every single Beyoncé song and Beyoncé was there.

2. Briefly describe how, when, and where you consumed the two hours of Beyoncé’s performance.
Luckerson: On my laptop Sunday afternoon, with the audio blasting from my floor-standing speakers. My immediate reactions were a mixture of shocked Wee-Bey, amazed Antonio Banderas, and of course, reverent Beyoncé.

Bereznak: I was on my way out of yoga and glanced at Twitter, which was understandably having a meltdown over this show. That led me to a link where Coachella was livestreaming a replay of the whole performance. I stood on the sidewalk outside of the studio for about 20 minutes staring down at my phone, fangirling.

Eventually I got really cold. But I didn’t want to miss anything on my four-minute walk home. So I wandered into a nearby nail salon, asked for a pedicure, and sat down to witness this historic moment uninterrupted. I didn’t even have headphones! I was *that annoying person* who blares loud music from their phone in a public place. (Of course, in my mind, I was doing everyone a favor.)

About 30 minutes later, I got a text alerting me that I’d burned through all my data for the month, and that I’d be charged an additional $15 for every additional gigabyte of data I used. I swiped it out of my view because it was in the way of Beyoncé performing “Mi Gente.” I must’ve hit the fan button at the nail-drying station six separate times just to keep watching. By the time it was done, my toe polish was rock hard and I, personally, felt changed for life.

Peters: I began watching Beyoncé’s set on Twitter on Saturday. Then, unable to parse the CAPS, keyboard smashes, and GIFs, deleted Twitter from my phone, so I could consume the performance as it was meant to be consumed: on my couch, without the intrusions of the outside world, via a shitty stream rip hosted on [redacted].

James: I watched it at home from my couch, even though I’ll be seeing it in person later this week at Weekend 2 of Coachella. As a regular Weekend 2 attendee, I normally don’t watch Weekend 1 streams of sets that I’m definitely going to be at, but it was one of the biggest artists in the world on the most iconic stage in modern American music. It was a cultural event that I needed to experience at the same time as everyone else.

Zoladz: On my home projector, as I realized that this was the reason I bought a home projector in the first place. I watched the first part Sunday afternoon, then went to see a movie with a friend, and then when she asked if I wanted to get a drink afterwards, I said, “I would love to, except I have to go home and watch the rest of this Beyoncé performance.” So yes, I canceled plans for Beyoncé, and I doubt it will be the last time.

Sherman: I’m washed. I hadn’t stayed up till 4 a.m. in a while. But honestly the set was good enough that I wasn’t really tired—my main problem was that I really needed to pee starting like 45 minutes in, and the set went on for like an hour after that, and I was perpetually convinced she was almost done. (She wasn’t.)

3. What was your favorite moment?
Luckerson: All the southern rap homages: “Back That Azz Up” mixed with “Crazy In Love,” “Swag Surfin’” interpolated in “Drunk in Love.” Beyoncé is a master of mash-ups (remember the “Clique”/”Diva” remix from the On the Run tour?), and I appreciated that most of the homages in this show were to southern artists. While there’s some debate about whether Texas is part of the South, it’s clear where Bey stands.

Bereznak: That’s like asking what a person’s favorite brush stroke is on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel! This set was legendary because of its cumulative grandiosity. That being said, I teared up during “I Care” and cackled over the “suck on my balls” portion of the evening.

Peters: OBVIOUSLY THE STEP SEQUENCE TO THE “SUCK ON MY BALLS” CHANT. ARE THERE OTHER ACCEPTABLE ANSWERS? NO––NO THERE ARE NOT.

James: Judging by my involuntary physical reaction of jumping off the couch, I would say it was when Destiny’s Child launched into “Say My Name,” but the moment that will stick with me most was when she explicitly acknowledged being the first black woman to headline Coachella. I’m glad she called that out so that fact didn’t escape anyone. We had a hologram of a dead man in a headlining act before we had a black woman headline.

Zoladz: That’s like asking Beyoncé to pick her favorite twin! But some standouts were the “suck on my balls” interlude of “Sorry,” the very emotional (and very Prince-esque) performance of “I Care,” the dance with Solange, “Say My Name,” “Love On Top”—OK, I have to stop now because I could really go on all day.

Sherman: I really think the phrase “suck on my balls” hasn’t been given enough opportunity to shine as an insult available to all people, regardless of whether they have testicles or not. Beyoncé is finally shifting this paradigm.

4. Which song worked best with the marching band?
Luckerson: The three-minute run when she performs “Countdown” and “Check On It” while strutting above the crowd on a catwalk as her brass band trails her is pure joy.

Bereznak: Beyoncé frequently closes with “Love On Top” for good reason. It’s a feel-good classic that everyone can sing along to. Having a giant marching band as her backup made a song that already brims with joy all the more uplifting—especially since it bookended what can only be described as a historic human feat.

Peters: “Swag Surfin’” by a lot, which that Coachella audience––equal parts confused and “help”—did not deserve.

James: “Formation” was obviously well suited for the band, but I really loved the horns blasting through the chorus of “Crazy In Love.” A few songs into the performance I was worried that I might get a little fatigued on the limited sound of the band, but that never quite happened for me.

Zoladz: “Sorry” was the moment I started texting all my friends “HOLY SHIT.”

Sherman: Better than any individual reworking of Beyoncé’s songs were the snippets of other pieces of music that kept showing up in the middle of Beyoncé’s songs. I genuinely yelled at Beyoncé backing her ass up to a brass band booming “Back That Azz Up.”

5. Jay-Z’s time on stage: Not enough, or too much?
Luckerson:

Bereznak: Just enough. He wasn’t on her level. But the show was a tribute to her career, and Jay-Z is an indisputable part of that. It made sense to me that they chose an early young-in-love hit like “Deja Vu” as opposed to a Lemonade-era number. The night wasn’t meant to be about him.

Peters: I think the couple minutes and the cheesy, loving “YESSSSSSSS IT’S SO CRAZY RIGHT NOW” was just enough for Jay to be a nice footnote, but not enough for him to overstay his welcome.

James: However many seconds Bey wanted Jay to be out there is the right number of seconds for him to be out there.

Zoladz: Juuuust enough to keep him in line and remind him who the true breadwinner of the Knowles-Carter family is these days. Also was it just me or did he seem winded, even though he was only up there for 1 percent of his wife’s incredibly athletic set?

Sherman: The perfect amount. If Jay doesn’t show up while all the other important people in Beyoncé’s life do, it’s a statement of some sort, and we have to talk about it. But did anybody actually want to hear Jay perform a whole song? Having Jay appear for 30 groan-worthy seconds really sums up his relevance in 2018. It momentarily killed the vibe, but it was a necessary evil.

6. The Destiny’s Child reunion was ________.
Luckerson: Kelly Rowland’s reminder that she won “Soldier.”

Bereznak: Everything I could’ve asked for! Kelly and Michelle held their own and brought out a playful energy in Beyoncé that you only see when she’s sharing the stage with women she loves. (See Solange’s appearance.) Not to mention, “Lose My Breath” was designed to be performed with a live drumline.

Peters: An important reminder that Kelly Rowland is actually perfect; I’m thinking specifically of the moment where she swung the mic like a dick during that line on “Soldier,” when they’re talking about dicks.

James: There’s a clip on YouTube in which you can hear a grown man yelling “OhhHHH MY GODDDD” at the top of his lungs. That wasn’t me, but it also wasn’t not me.

I have to admit though, I was wincing pretty hard when it came time for them to walk off the stage.

Zoladz: A delight! If a glaring reminder that Michelle Williams is the Ringo Starr of Destiny’s Child. I thought their voices sounded great together, though, and did you see that smile on Bey’s face when they were doing “Say My Name”?! It seemed like a really special moment for her.

Sherman: Evidence that Destiny’s Child would be an elite pop act if still together. I guess it’s okay that Beyoncé went on to do other stuff, though.

7. What was Beyoncé’s most physically impressive feat during her performance?
Luckerson: Stepping aside to let that majorette hurl her batons a mile in the sky.

Bereznak: The sheer endurance of it all. Beyoncé has a PhD in being Beyoncé. She hit every hip sway and shoulder pop like it had been directly uploaded into her brain from her storied self-dedicated vault, all while bringing genuine skin-tingling emotion to every note of every song.

Peters: The fact that she was onstage for the duration of a blockbuster movie and never once sounded out of breath? Think about how winded you sound walking up a single flight of stairs while on the phone.

James: It’s got to be the endurance. Something you can always say about Beyoncé—she endures.

Zoladz: Much has, and should, be made of the pure athletic stamina, but to me the most impressive thing was her sheer presence as a performer—the way she telegraphed that for every second of that damn near two-hour set she was in control. You need a lot of energy to do that. But it’s there in the slow confidence with which she prowls the stage, the almost taunting quality of her gaze. It’s like she’s connecting with every single member of the audience, benevolently judging them for not living up to their full potential, and inspiring them to try harder, because to disappoint Beyoncé would be the most soul-crushing thing imaginable. Who needs therapy when you can just watch this performance every morning?

Sherman: Honestly, I wouldn’t have been able to remember the whole setlist, let alone dance for two straight hours while remembering it. Also, I don’t think she sweats?

https://www.theringer.com/music/2018/4/ ... xit-survey
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Postby ThaInfo1 » Mon Apr 16, 2018 4:58 pm

Listening to the audio at work :cry:

I gotta watch this again. This is a moment for me :cry:
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Postby Hugo » Mon Apr 16, 2018 4:59 pm

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How much is too much?

When it comes to Beyonce, I’m not sure what the upper limit is, or if there even is one. Her extravagant Coachella set certainly would have approached was she anyone other than Beyonce. But because she is Beyonce, and because it was Coachella, somehow, it seemed that no matter how much she did, how much more happened during her epic, genre-spanning set, it was not enough. Like Jell-O, it seems there is always room for more Beyonce.

When rumors that she was spending insanely long hours in rehearsals with hundreds of dancers surfaced ahead of the festival, it seemed like a prime example of something that just couldn’t be true. Except — again — because it was Beyonce, it seemed, if not reasonable, fathomable, or feasible, it at least seemed possible. Last night, she turned up without the hundreds of speculated dancers and instead, brought a full-on HBCU marching band for a homecoming, hip-hop history lesson that won’t soon be forgotten by anyone in attendance.

Sorority jackets, baton twirlers, drumlines, massive brass sections, line pledges — you name it, if it related to a historically Black college/university tradition, Beyonce probably included it, all in the service of a message that has been rare for this festival’s main stage. Espousing a directive of unabashed Black self-love and celebrating femininity has almost been unheard of from the headliners of Coachella. There have been very few women, very few Black performers, and even less artists who check both boxes. Then along comes Beyonce Knowles-Carter, resetting the expectations for what a Coachella headliner should look like, sound like, and most importantly, how one should perform. There’s a new standard, and it’s practically impossible to live up to.

Not only were the marching band-embellished renditions of the songs bolder, brasher, bigger, and more boisterous than ever, all the callbacks to classic, Southern hip-hop and R&B made the performance nothing less than a catalog of Black excellence. From “Lift Every Voice And Sing,” the official Black National Anthem, to SpottieOttieDopealicious, the unofficial Black national anthem, Beyonce’s massive performance was like a love letter to the traditions, culture, heritage, and people that have long been one of the backbones of American history — albeit an under-appreciated, underserved, and often outright mistreated one.

Where the time allotted disallowed Beyonce to call back to every hit in her nearly 20-year-long catalog, she found ways to sneak in clever references. The “Bugaboos,” her line pledges, each declared themselves the name of one of her many, many classics, including an AKA of another before stomping the Empire Polo Club yard.

The list of guests was almost as extensive as the list of hits. Beyonce’s sister, Solange, made an appearance, as did her husband Jay-Z. Of course, fans seemed most excited for the reunion of Destiny’s Child, complete with coordinated camouflage bodysuits, to perform a medley of their biggest hits including, of course, “Soldier.”

With every bop, every guest, every costume change, Beyonce not only raised the stakes, she doubled down and continued to win. When a clip of DJ Khaled played midway through her set declaring that “Coachella will have to change the name to Beychella,” it felt less prophetic and more a statement of fact. Beyonce owns Coachella now, she took it, it’s hers, and she’s basically just letting every other artist on the bill rent space there until her return.

That isn’t to say there weren’t other dazzling sets throughout the day. Nile Rodgers and Chic ran through a list of hits nearly as extensive as Beyonce’s. Tyler, The Creator turned up to favorites from his Flower Boy album. Beyonce signees Chloe X Halle flashed potential, and Jorja Smith absolutely shut down the smaller stage to which she was assigned. Brockhampton’s orchestral backup evoked the upcoming extravaganza, and the crowd for Flatbush Zombies matched their energy beat for beat.

But every set felt, if not perfunctory, then much like a placeholder until Beyonce’s. Fans started camping out for her promptly at 1 PM that afternoon and didn’t relinquish their spots until well after she’d left the stage after her explosive performance. They would say it was well worth it. After all, no amount of time spent waiting or punishing desert sun or uncomfortable campout in the turf or missed performances from the most performers of the day, absolutely nothing is too much for Beyonce.

https://uproxx.com/music/beyonce-coache ... solange/3/
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Postby Hugo » Mon Apr 16, 2018 5:02 pm

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Last night, over wifi, Jogai Bhatt witnessed Beyonce turn one of the whitest functions of the year – Coachella – into a glorious ode to Black artistry.

I’ve started writing this piece around eight times now. I’ve lost sleep over it. I missed breakfast over it. I was nearly late to work over it. And that’s because I haven’t been able to stop thinking about the grand visual experience that was on display last night. There are no words to adequately describe, no words sufficient in this lowly language, to communicate the majesty of what went down.

On April 15, 2018, the greatest living entertainer took the stage for an unparalleled two-hour performance and effectively turned one of the whitest functions of the year into a glorious ode to Black artistry. For reasons unexplained, though most likely divine, I was given the good fortune of bearing witness to it all through the generous filter of my MacBook Air.

I am, of course, referring to Beyonce Giselle Knowles-Carter’s set at Coachella.

“Thank you Coachella for allowing me to be the first black woman to headline,” she told the crowd. “Ain’t that ‘bout a bitch?” This historic feat was not to go unnoticed. Opening with a regal walk to the stage in Nefertiti-inspired attire and featuring arrangements from HBCU marching bands, her team orchestrated a celebration of the culture that we all owe so much to. A performance for Black people, by Black people, but one to be acknowledged by all.

Incorporating historically Black college tradition, sampling Malcolm X quotes, performing homages to Nina Simone and Fela Kuti, to singing ‘Lift Every Voice and Sing’, otherwise known as The Black National Anthem, Beyoncé crossed every genre of Black musical excellence in a performance so immersive I could barely break away (except to tweet). DJ Wally Sparks of Atlanta processed so many more references that went completely over my head.

Our queen didn’t limit herself to the richness of pre-2000s cultural archive. Beyoncé brought modern culture to the forefront by way of some prominent guest appearances. Hov appeared for a rendition of their B’Day hit ‘Deja Vu’, Solange ran on stage for a sisterly dance routine to ‘Get Me Bodied’, and the ethereal demi-goddesses of Destiny’s Child reunited once more, sending me into a momentary daze of euphoric bliss. Oof!

We got a taste of ‘Soldier’ and ‘Say My Name’ and ‘Lose My Breath’. We probably would’ve had ‘Bills Bills Bills’ and ‘Cater 2 U’ if P*st M*lone didn’t occupy more than his allocated stage time. But I digress, because Michelle goddamn crip walked for Jesus, and all my bitter feelings towards the aforementioned melted away.

A New York Times review described the set as, perhaps, the most “meaningful, absorbing, forceful and radical” performance to come from an American musician this year, and there likely won’t be one to surpass it. From lively arrangements to fragmented references, and deconstructions of her own hits, Beyoncé’s Coachella set redefined innovation to bring live and virtual audiences an indelible experience, weaving a musical tapestry rich with history, politics, and visual grandeur.

The general sentiment for those viewing the live stream last night was an overwhelming sense of, this shouldn’t be free. I can’t believe this is free, because having something so immersive and monumental and history-defining at the tip of your fingers doesn’t feel like something any of us deserve. But last night, it was, in all its considered glory. And for that, we thank our generous queen. I know I’ll be thinking about this for a very, very long time.

https://thespinoff.co.nz/music/16-04-20 ... coachella/
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Postby Hugo » Mon Apr 16, 2018 5:04 pm







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Postby BeeBoy » Mon Apr 16, 2018 5:20 pm

And they say the hive are the only ones claiming this and are delusional :lol:
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Postby Hugo » Mon Apr 16, 2018 5:22 pm

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On Saturday night, Beyoncé made history as the first black woman to headline Coachella, a year after her original performance was postponed due to her pregnancy with twins. Fans were quick to dub the massive concert series “Beychella,” and it’s hard to argue with them. As New York Times music reviewer Jon Caramanica declared, “there’s not likely to be a more meaningful, absorbing, forceful and radical performance by an American musician this year or any year soon.”

Although the nearly two-hour long performance was notable for its many surprises, Beyoncé’s show was about much more than her reunion with Michelle Williams and Kelly Rowland of former girl group Destiny’s Child or her duet with rapper husband Jay-Z, as a number of publications have highlighted. It certainly cemented her place in music history, but what was most notable was the way it was unabashedly an homage to both her own roots and the influence of the black South on American pop culture. This was black excellence at its most beautiful and most bold, performed for the world to see in front of an audience that is known both for its cultural cachet and its racial ignorance.

Staged with all the pageantry and glorious excess of the homecoming half-time shows intimately familiar to black Southerners and generations of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) alums, Beyoncé took the stage in royal attire worthy of this post-“Black Panther” moment. With a dazzling black crown punctuated by pops of gold and backed by a full marching band, dancers and more, the grandeur made a statement, especially at a festival filled with performances marked by minimal staging.

But again, this wasn’t spectacle for the sake of spectacle, something reviewers lacking a comprehensive understanding of Beyoncé’s career and background seem to have misunderstood. Using the marching band’s drum majors, dancers and regal pageantry as her anchor, Beyoncé laid bare her black Southern cultural pedigree. Hits like “Crazy in Love,” “Formation” and “Say My Name” (with her Destiny’s Child bandmates) were interspersed with mashups from the band, which seamlessly weaved in references to Southern pioneer Master P’s “No Limit” catalogue and other influential Southern rap, including her native Texas’s chopped and screwed sound.

This is a woman whose black Southern DNA runs super deep. Her father, as she boasted in “Formation,” is from Alabama and her mother's family hails from Louisiana. Beyoncé herself is a Texan, born and raised. Mathew Knowles, her longtime former manager, graduated from Nashville’s Fisk University, the home of the Fisk Jubilee Singers, early pioneers for spreading black music globally. Such authenticity was also reflected in those on the stage with her: The marching band members hailed from such revered programs as Florida A&M, Prairie View A&M University, North Carolina A&T, Tennessee State University and Alabama State University and were directed by the legendary Don P. Roberts.

Beyoncé could have stopped there and her performance would have still been legendary. But showing the influence of black Southern artists on hip-hop and contemporary pop music wasn’t enough — this was a concert about the black cultural influence writ large. Echoing the struggles of the civil rights era, Beyoncé sang verses of “Lift Every Voice and Sing,” also known as the Black National Anthem, which has was a staple of black gatherings throughout the 20th century. Her dance-off with sister Solange — which included the childhood game patty cake — suggested how subtle early cultural transmission can be.

To highlight the black Greek experience, Beyoncé even created her very own sorority of Beta Delta Kappa, complete with a custom coat of arms, to showcase probate and step shows like those Spike Lee widely spotlighted in “School Daze” 30 years ago.

Other black cultural touchstones included references to Nina Simone (who was posthumously inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame that same night), a sample of a Malcolm X speech declaring that “the most disrespected woman in America is the black woman” and a performance of her 2013 hit “Flawless” featuring the voice of Nigerian author Chimamanda Adichie. Additional nods to the African Diaspora included the sounds of Afrobeat creator Fela Kuti and reggae.

For so long the price of black superstardom has come with a certain “colorlessness” and “universal appeal,” effectively deemphasizing the artist’s black identity. Michael Jackson easily comes to mind. And a few years ago, Beyoncé appeared to be following a similar script. But, with her “Formation” video and Super Bowl 50 performance paying tribute to the Black Panther Party’s female leadership two years ago, she has made a defiant turn towards her black identity.

In an era where casually dressed professional black men are still being arrested for sitting quietly in a Starbucks, Beyoncé’s decision to embrace and celebrate that black identity is more powerful than ever. She has simultaneously affirmed her “Wakanda Forever” solidarity while challenging her legions of non-black fans to accept all of what she represents.

Beyoncé has dominated the urban and pop music scenes for more than a decade now. With Beychella, she left few doubts that she has earned her place alongside the all-time greats, especially Michael Jackson and James Brown. Like them, she has built upon the black cultural tradition in powerful ways, creating new music that never forgets where it comes from.

Still a few years shy of 40, Beyoncé has grown increasingly fearless with no signs of slowing down. The more she faces off against patriarchy, white supremacy and misogynoir, her voice and message has become louder and more inescapable than ever. The mother of three is determined to do more than her part to make this world a better place and is challenging all of us to get in “formation.”

https://www.nbcnews.com/think/opinion/b ... ncna866326
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Postby Hugo » Mon Apr 16, 2018 5:26 pm

KEY9481 wrote:HOMECOMING SCHOLARS AWARDS PROGRAM

Today, Beyoncé, through her BeyGOOD initiative, announces the four schools to receive the newly established Homecoming Scholars Award Program for the 2018-2019 academic year. The Universities, Xavier, Wilberforce, Tuskegee and Bethune-Cookman, are all Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). HBCUs are institutions of higher education in the United States that were established before the Civil Rights Act of 1964 with the intention of primarily serving the African-American community.

On Saturday, April 14, Beyoncé made history at the 2018 Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival by becoming the first Black woman to headline in the festival's 19-year run.

The jubilant set, housed on a pyramid stage with 150-plus cast members, dutifully in-sync, was the first time the icon returned to her home, the stage, in over one year.

The show, with its homage to excellence in education, was a celebration of the homecoming weekend experience, the highest display of college pride. The energy-filled production put the spotlight on art and culture, mixing the ancient and the modern, which resonated masterfully through the marching band, performance art, choir and dance. It was the impetus to mark her second scholarship program.

"We salute the rich legacy of Historically Black Colleges and Universities," states Ivy McGregor, Director of Philanthropy and Corporate Relations at Parkwood Entertainment which houses BeyGOOD. "We honor all institutions of higher learning for maintaining culture and creating environments for optimal learning which expands dreams and the seas of possibilities for students."

One winner from each school will receive $25K for the 2018-2019 academic year for study in various fields. This is the second year for a scholars program created by Beyoncé.

The Formation Scholars Awards Program, a merit scholarship program was established in April 2017 in celebration of the one-year anniversary of LEMONADE, Beyoncé's critically-acclaimed and globally-lauded 2016 visual album. The Formation Scholars awards encouraged and supported young women who are bold, creative, conscious, confident and unafraid to think outside of the box.

The Homecoming Scholars Award Program for 2018-2019 will expand to all qualifying students at the four universities, regardless of gender. The disciplines will include literature, creative arts, African- American studies, science, education, business, communications, social sciences, computer science and engineering. All applicants must maintain a 3.5 GPA or above. All finalists and winners will be selected by the universities. Winners will be announced this summer.

https://www.beyonce.com/article/homecom ... s-program/
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Postby Hugo » Mon Apr 16, 2018 5:58 pm

FINALLY! p4k

Image

At this point, the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival is a massive, corporate operation underwritten by computer companies and Heineken Houses and Post Malones. Despite that—or maybe because of it—this year’s edition was blessed with an electric jolt at its core. On Saturday night, Beyoncé executed one of the most precise, demanding, and altogether staggering performances by any musician on a national stage in recent memory. Her headlining set—a first for a black woman at Coachella, as she pointed out from the stage—served to clarify the intent and impact of a superstar who is only growing more subversive as time goes on.

Increasingly, Beyoncé has used her art—that is, everything: the albums themselves, but also her videos, her tours, Instagram, and so on—to examine power imbalances and to show how people blanch when those imbalances are brought up to the surface for examination. Think about the “Formation” video, in which a black child dances in front of a line of cops wearing riot gear, or her Super Bowl halftime show, where she paid homage to the Black Panthers, or her Lemonade longform visual, in which she reimagined images of American wealth and power with black women at the forefront.

In a way, all of it was a prelude to Saturday’s set, which felt like her most definitive statement yet, the kind of show that requires a deep and widely-known catalog, ideological ambition, and a thorough knowledge of history (musical and otherwise). Beyoncé has a cultural sixth sense for finding the busted seams between regions and eras and styles, and the performance saw her stitching those breaks back together in a way that made them new again.

Throughout the set, she was joined by dozens of dancers, musicians, and actors: Sometimes the mass of supporting players gelled into a step team or a second line; sometimes the brass section lapsed into OutKast’s “SpottieOttieDopaliscious.” The opening blast blended “Crazy in Love” into “Back That Azz Up” into a screwed version of “Crazy in Love” into C-Murder’s “Down 4 My N’s.” Nearly all of her songs were played in full, but even the brief glimpses into other catalogs felt like compelling history lessons. Every component part of the set—from, say, “Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It)” to a Nina Simone interpolation—was a necessary piece of a larger whole, revealing how the act of synthesis is at the very center of her art.

At Coachella, Beyoncé’s uncanny sense of cohesion went beyond music too. Her feminism spanned from the lustful “Partition” to the unyielding “Run the World,” her pro-blackness from Malcolm X to Fela Kuti. One of the most impressive parts about Saturday’s set was Beyoncé’s ability to make songs from across her two-decade career seem to be in conversation with one another. And instead of reconciling the tension between her multitudes—or even acknowledging that such tensions exist—she presented everything in a way that made intuitive sense to her audience.

Speaking of audience: Beyoncé staging such a thoroughly pro-black show at a notoriously white festival like Coachella had a clear creative bent, another instance of her willingness to broach power imbalances in mixed company. But it also gave her a tremendous platform: Anyone can stream this performance for free, bypassing pricey tickets to a stadium tour.

Finally, on an aesthetic level, it was an exceptional showing. From the Destiny’s Child reunion to “Diva” to the pacing curveball that was “Lift Every Voice and Sing,” Beyoncé’s vocals were loose and powerful. The choreography was clean and sophisticated, despite the sheer number of limbs involved. It was, put simply, a career-defining performance.

read more: https://pitchfork.com/features/festival ... -the-ages/
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Postby KEY9481 » Mon Apr 16, 2018 6:31 pm



I love this woman so damn much.
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Postby Jesper » Mon Apr 16, 2018 6:34 pm

okay I am still shook I even heard my mother say this. My mother is not a Bey fan, she only likes Crazy In Love and Runnin and Say My Name related to Bey lol. I always call her a lowkey hater, but there was a segment about Beychella on TV and my mother randomly started a discussion with my Stepfather how Bey is the best entertainer on this world. :o

Also I love that post Tina posted, Bey is still so humble
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Postby Hype » Mon Apr 16, 2018 7:28 pm

Just finished watching!

All these accolades are just simply deserved. She is the greatest entertainer of our time. She is the female Michael Jackson. No one can ever top her. Everything she does just commands admiration and respect and rightly so. I loved every minute of the performance and it was just as spectacular as I thought it would be and as everyone has described.

I’m hungry for a DC3 tour now.
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Postby Hugo » Mon Apr 16, 2018 8:26 pm

Beychella now has its own wiki topic: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beyonc%C3 ... erformance
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Postby Yoshie » Mon Apr 16, 2018 8:41 pm

EVENT OF THE CENTURY.

This incredible bitch... :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry:
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Postby KEY9481 » Mon Apr 16, 2018 9:06 pm

Finally my live album is ready. This night is about to be LIT.

Send a PM if you want it for iTunes.
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Postby KEY9481 » Mon Apr 16, 2018 9:23 pm







#WIG
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Postby Hugo » Mon Apr 16, 2018 9:29 pm

Ok, but where's the stream omg I can't...
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Postby Ska8er » Mon Apr 16, 2018 9:59 pm

Maybe TIDAL will have rights for Weekend 2?

We probably won't get DC3 again, which means more solo songs/other guest stars (e.g. Kendrick, Nicki).
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Postby KEY9481 » Mon Apr 16, 2018 10:01 pm

Hugo wrote:Ok, but where's the stream omg I can't...
Some pages are saying it will be streamed on Youtube again.
I need TIDAL tho (as I said yesterday, the quality is SO MUCH BETTER).
Hopefully it will happen.
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Postby Ska8er » Mon Apr 16, 2018 10:09 pm

KEY9481 wrote:
Hugo wrote:Ok, but where's the stream omg I can't...
Some pages are saying it will be streamed on Youtube again.
I need TIDAL tho (as I said yesterday, the quality is SO MUCH BETTER).
Hopefully it will happen.
I suggested TIDAL due to our previous discussion on the matter. We definitely know that YouTube holds the right for Weekend 1, but if it won't stream Weekend 2 then TIDAL might broadcast just B's show?

I would love for a second show with potential changes and fixes on some errors. I know I'm nitpicking, but her final costume malfunction was distracting, and there's a Bugaboo that messed up during their introductory section that frustrates me :lol:

Fingers crossed!
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Postby KEY9481 » Mon Apr 16, 2018 10:12 pm

I just know she was pissed about that last costume :lol: you could see she wanted to go off on the dancing but couldn't.

Image

I wonder if these will be on the setlist then.
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Postby hellohello » Mon Apr 16, 2018 10:14 pm

Hugo wrote:Beychella now has its own wiki topic: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beyonc%C3 ... erformance
Only King Bey... :cry: :cry: :cry:
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