Prince

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Postby SmittyRoc70 » Mon Oct 30, 2017 4:07 pm

A Look at Prince Through the Lens of His Personal Photographer

https://noisey.vice.com/en_us/article/9 ... in-shahidi
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Postby SmittyRoc70 » Mon Oct 30, 2017 4:08 pm

Painting The Palace Purple: Umphrey’s McGee Honors Prince In St. Paul – Recap, Photos & Video
Oct 29, 2017
•7:15 am PDT
•By Andy Kahn

https://www.jambase.com/article/paintin ... otos-video
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Postby SmittyRoc70 » Mon Oct 30, 2017 4:09 pm

It Was Hard To Take A Bad Picture Of Prince, The Musician's Longtime Photographer Says

In his new book "Prince: A Private View," Afshin Shahidi unveils many unseen photos and reflects on the two decades he spent as Prince's photographer.

Shahidi (@AfshinShahidi) tells Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson about his collaboration with Prince and the impact the artist had on him and the world.

http://www.wbur.org/hereandnow/2017/10/ ... idi-prince
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Postby SmittyRoc70 » Mon Oct 30, 2017 4:11 pm

If You Love Prince, You’ll Want to See This London Show

‘My Name Is Prince’ is a shimmering tribute to an iconic figure—but it’s a shame this is a memorial not a full exploration of one of the most influential musicians of a generation.

Nico HinesNico Hines

10.28.17 9:02 PM ET

LONDON—When Abraham Lincoln was assassinated in 1865 his body embarked on a two-week tour of the union. Hundreds of thousands of mourners in five states lined up to pay their final respects before the president’s open-casket.

A 21st century version of that procession has just begun in London. There is no open-casket but in the exhibition My Name Is Prince at The O2 center in East London, Prince is memorialized by scores of tiny mannequins decked out in some of the exquisite and elaborate costumes that helped transform the Minnesota musician into one of the most recognizable men on the planet.
https://www.thedailybeast.com/if-you-lo ... ondon-show
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Postby SmittyRoc70 » Mon Oct 30, 2017 4:13 pm

Prince's '1999': How the Synth-Pop Masterpiece Launched a Movement

His artiest, most demanding album to date made him a big-time star

"Don't worry," announces the warped robot voice at the start of Prince's 1999. "I won't hurt U. I only want U 2 have some fun."

Is this the voice of God? Or Prince's synthesizers talking back to him? Either way, this guy's got his own idea of fun. And he spends the next 70 minutes building his spiritual and political philosophy around the urge to party. He sets off security sirens at the club by masturbating on the dance floor. He solves the nation's evils by staging a sex-as-redemption ritual with his lady cabdriver in the back seat. He dances under the shadow of the mushroom cloud, as the double-drag warmongers finally hit the little red button and blow up the planet – but not before Prince squeezes in one more Saturday night of letting that lion in his pocket roar. He gathers musicians of different races and genders into a communal church, dedicated to the higher purpose of getting Prince more action. You can't accuse the man of thinking small.

At just 24, Prince dropped 1999 in October 1982. In career terms, it was supposed to be his art album. Maybe he'd crack rock radio, setting him up to make his pop-crossover move next time. But the plan failed – because there was no way the pop audience could resist 1999. Prince ended up becoming a big-time star with his artiest, most extreme, most demanding music.

http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/ ... nt-w510208
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Postby SmittyRoc70 » Mon Oct 30, 2017 4:15 pm

My Name Is Prince – inside the new London exhibition

Dan Stubbs
By
Dan Stubbs
Oct 30, 2017

It’s been just over a year since Prince, perhaps the world’s most mysterious and smallest rockstar, died at 57. By way of memorial, touring exhibition My Name Is Prince has debuted at London’s The O2, a venue close to the performer’s heart having been the scene of his 21 sold-out shows in 2007.

Following in the vein of David Bowie Is and the recent Pink Floyd show Their Mortal Remains, both at The V&A, My Name Is Prince collects costumes, instruments and artefacts from Prince’s career. It’s a little light in terms of information about Prince’s life – and death – but it’s rare chance to peek into the Paisley Park archives for those unable to visit Prince’s Chanhassen, Minnesota estate. And that, curator Angie Marchesse said at the launch, is the point. “Visiting Paisley park is a way of saying goodbye, finding closure,” she said. “And this is a way of doing that for people who can’t make it there.”

Check out the exhibition in the pictures and video below. My Name Is Prince is at The O2 until January 7, 2018.

http://www.nme.com/blogs/nme-blogs/my-n ... es-2154098
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Postby DOSSOME » Mon Oct 30, 2017 7:35 pm

Do Me, Baby <3333 :cry:
Errr...Nice attempt but sit anyway
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Postby SmittyRoc70 » Thu Nov 02, 2017 4:15 pm

Prince's Earnings: $18 Million In 2017
Zack O'Malley Greenburg , Forbes Staff 

Prince earned $18 million pretax over the past year, landing him the No. 7 spot on our Halloween-spooky list of highest-paid dead celebrities. Here’s a deeper look inside the numbers.

Real Name: Prince Rogers Nelson

Born: June 7, 1958 in Minneapolis, Minn.

Died: April 21, 2016 in Chanhassen, Minn.

Age: 57

Cause: Drug Overdose

The Purple One's earnings took a dip from last year's $25 million total--he passed away while still at the top of his touring game, grossing nearly $2 million per show, which was factored into his final tally.

This year Prince clearly had no live dates, but his haul would have been much greater had a $31 million record deal with Universal not been reversed earlier this year. As is, he still collected millions from a new publishing deal and continued consumption of his music.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/zackomalle ... fe5a265b48
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Postby JJeffs » Thu Nov 02, 2017 4:28 pm

I've been listening to Prince regularly since his passing. I've always been a fan and was very into him in the 80s and 90s, but not as much after his name change and going independent. He had some great songs here and there in the new millenium, like Black Sweat, for one. I always liked the sexualized, Pop side of Prince.

My point is really that I've been listening more intently to his records I never really dove into, and experiencing that thing that happens sometimes when artists are no longer with us. I'm REALLY listening and appreciating all he had to offer much more than when he was still around. With him and say, Tom Petty, it's more prominent because they had such a huge discography compared to other artists, like Whitney, for example. I was familiar with all of her recordings because, relatively speaking, there aren't that many. I wonder if we'll hear more from her, as I'm sure we will with Prince.
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Postby SmittyRoc70 » Thu Nov 02, 2017 8:26 pm

^Very impressive and informative read. For most in the general record-buying public it's Purple Rain song and album and maybe 1999. And that's about it. P put out an amazing body of work. In fact, according to some analysts, his yet-to-be-released stuff from his vaults is so vast that it may go beyond our lifetime as far as releasing the material is concerned. Wow!
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Postby RayRay » Thu Nov 02, 2017 9:24 pm

I was searching for the song Marc Anthony Tune by his sister, but it's not on Spotify.
She was on the BBC for an interview just the other day.
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Postby Nippian93 » Sun Nov 05, 2017 11:08 pm

❤Whitney Houston
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Postby SmittyRoc70 » Tue Nov 07, 2017 3:44 pm

Auction house says $700k sale for Prince’s guitar a record

By Associated Press
November 5, 2017

A bidding war resulted in a $700,000 price tag for a Prince guitar — the highest price ever paid for one of the late icon’s guitars, according to Julien’s Auctions.

The blue teal “Cloud” guitar went far above the $60,000 to $80,000 expected at the Saturday auction. The guitar was one of several items up for sale by rock legends.

A Michael Jackson black and white rhinestone glove sold for $102,000 while a red snakeskin jacket in the mold of the one he wore in his “Beat It” video sold for $118,000. A MTV Video Music Award Moonman won by Kurt Cobain went for $62,500; a Nehru shirt worn by Jimmy Hendrix sold for $106,000, and handwritten lyrics to David Bowie’s “Starman” was sold for $81,000.
https://pagesix.com/2017/11/05/auction- ... -a-record/
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Postby SmittyRoc70 » Thu Nov 09, 2017 7:35 pm

The Guardian: Susan Rogers "He Need To Be the Alpha Male to Get Things Done"

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2017/ ... hings-done
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Postby SmittyRoc70 » Thu Nov 09, 2017 7:47 pm

Susan Rogers: From Prince to Ph.D.

by Larry Crane

Not only is Susan Rogers a record producer, engineer, mixer, and audio electronics technician, she has a doctorate in psychology (having studied music cognition and psychoacoustics) from McGill University. As an engineer Susan really got her start working with Prince from 1983 to 1988, including albums like Purple Rain, Around the World in a Day, Parade, Sign o' the Times, and The Black Album. Her other studio sessions have included artists like Barenaked Ladies, David Byrne, Toad the Wet Sprocket, Rusted Root, Tricky, Geggy Tah, and Michael Penn. She is currently the director of the Berklee Music Perception and Cognition Laboratory, and is an associate professor at Berklee. Portions of this interview were conducted after a listen to a vinyl LP of Purple Rain during the "Saturday Night Listening Party" at the Welcome to 1979 Recording Summit (held every November in Nashville), and the rest of the interview took place between she and I the following day.

How did you end up as a tech?

I worked for a company called Audio Industries Corporation in L.A. for Hal Michael; HM was what he was known as. When I was a kid, I always wanted to make records. I took piano lessons and I had zero affinity for it, but I played the radio and listened to records like a fiend. Sometimes on vinyl albums there would be a picture of the studio, and I fantasized about being in that place where records were made. I didn't see myself in terms of what I would do there, because I didn't know, but it wasn't performing. Then when I learned that there are people who make records...

Were you picking up session flow, and things like that?

I was starting to see how it worked, learning to listen to music as it comes together, and learning to develop that decision criterion for what constitutes a "perfect take." I'd hear the musicians play it over, and over, and over again. It was clear that the producer was searching for something that he hadn't heard yet. I'd listen and try to match my ear against theirs to see, "Will I know? This sounds right to me. What's the producer going to say?" I was learning the practical aspects of record making, plus I was learning our business. "Who are these people? What do we value? What do we talk about? How do we be in the world?" I could repair the tools, but I was getting a chance to see how people apply them. The first five years in L.A. were a good training ground. The music industry was changing. In 1980, there was new wave, disco, and drum machines. Samplers were just starting to appear, and this notion that, "We don't really need a drummer, because we have a drum machine. And we don't need a horn or string player, because these synthesizers do horns and strings pretty well. All you rock players, you can stay home now." It wasn't a paradigm shift, but there was an attitude shift. New wave was here: The Cars, The Police, and Devo, and shortly thereafter, Prince. And then there was the junior version of the next onslaught coming out of New York, and that was rap. That was just starting to heat up.

Audience: Sitting behind the console, listening to Purple Rain, end to end, what's that feel like right now?

The thing that I noticed now, that I wouldn't have noticed then, is that was one 24-year-old guy. I mean, you hear Lisa Coleman's chords at the end of "Purple Rain," you hear some of the girls [Wendy Melvoin and Lisa] doing background vocals, there's one solo from [Matt] "Doctor" Fink. The rest is one guy, and he's 24-years old. We were all young then, and it's like, "Yeah, everybody's 24-years old. Of course." We didn't really get it. But listening to that, I can't think of a peer. Stevie Wonder maybe? But this is one man, playing all the instruments, writing all the songs, singing all the parts, with no producer and no engineer, for all intents and purposes, because I joined him as a tech. This is what you do when you take a brilliant genius, give him a lot of money, and put him in a room with all the toys. This is what he makes.

Audience: So it still amazes you to hear it all? That's awesome.

Yeah, because you can't find examples of many parallels. When you think about it, you hear that guitar, you hear his incredible keyboard skills, and you realize that, at any given moment on that record, he could do that. He could have filled up that record with virtuoso guitar playing, with virtuoso keyboard playing, and with virtuoso singing. But he'll do ten minutes of just drum machine on "Baby, I'm a Star." Then here's another thing to consider. His lyrics. It's not Leonard Cohen, but think about... he's talking about an "us." I would die for you. Let's go crazy. Take me with you. It's a generous record. He's happy to be alive. He's happy to be 24. He clearly loves people. He's not a sexual predator. He's not talking about "I will conquer you," with that braggadocio of young men. There's us, and we're having fun. That's pretty great. Especially when you consider that he's one guy from north Minneapolis, all alone. He was so alone that he created his own competition. He created The Time and Vanity 6, and it was still all him. He played all the instruments, wrote all their songs, did the whole thing, and then had them come in and do the vocals.
(read the rest of the article from this link...)

https://tapeop.com/interviews/117/susan-rogers/
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