Stopped at number 76 (1983-1991)

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Postby wranglerjeans » Tue Jan 01, 2019 7:52 pm

On this discussion of Zobbel versus Official Charts Company, flicking through my copy of Complete Book of British Charts: Singles & Albums, 3rd edition by Tony Brown, Jon Kutner and Neil Warwick, they do refer to Hit Music and therefore Zobbel's data when stating that a track previously charted at for example 137 in 1998 and having checked some of Zobbel's downloadable Chartwatch magazines against the book it appears that this book definitely does not use the OCC data until May 2001 when both sources became more or less the same. It does seems crazy why they had to do all this in the first place and not just create positions 76 downwards the same instead of complicating things! What does anybody else think about all this? Also does anyone have a list of OCC tracks from positions 76 to 100 that never made Top 75 from 1995 to 2005 as I have compiled elsewhere in this website from 2006 to 2010?
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Postby Robbie » Tue Jan 01, 2019 8:02 pm

wranglerjeans wrote:On this discussion of Zobbel versus Official Charts Company, flicking through my copy of Complete Book of British Charts: Singles & Albums, 3rd edition by Tony Brown, Jon Kutner and Neil Warwick, they do refer to Hit Music and therefore Zobbel's data when stating that a track previously charted at for example 137 in 1998 and having checked some of Zobbel's downloadable Chartwatch magazines against the book it appears that this book definitely does not use the OCC data until May 2001 when both sources became more or less the same. It does seems crazy why they had to do all this in the first place and not just create positions 76 downwards the same instead of complicating things! What does anybody else think about all this? Also does anyone have a list of OCC tracks from positions 76 to 100 that never made Top 75 from 1995 to 2005 as I have compiled elsewhere in this website from 2006 to 2010?
The official charts (i.e the ones with the exclusiuon rules) from back then are all in the OCC archive on their website. You'd need to look through every one of them though to find out what peaked at numbers 76 to 100 on their chart.

Good luck hunting through all of them though!

https://www.officialcharts.com/charts/singles-chart/
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Postby wranglerjeans » Tue Jan 08, 2019 9:39 am

I have attempted a few times to research these but to be honest what you see is what you get! It appears generally from random searching of these positions 76 to 100 from 1995 to 2005 that hardly any tracks climb into Top 75 as was the case when I researched positions 41 to 75 for the same period. If the track did not enter the Top 40 the first week, it would seldom do so and indeed with anything entering between 41 and 75 a handful of tracks (and I do mean literally a handful!) would then enter Top 40. If it enters between 76 and 100, in 99 out of 100 cases I would say it will never become a Top 75 chart hit. There are however several tracks though that originally made 76 to 100 but would later (maybe six months or a couple of years after) then became a Top 75 hit on a separate chart run! So although this is an interesting project it would take too long and seem rather pointless as any chart you look at all those entries are non-top 75 hits if you get my meaning! Phew! Sometimes up to a dozen tracks would enter these positions 76 to 100 alone as well!
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Postby Gambo » Thu Jan 10, 2019 6:17 pm

To be honest Wrangler, we could've told you that much! The 1995 to 2005 period was the height of the 'front-loading' marketing ploy that the industry began at the turn of the decade in the UK and perfected within five years, by which time the singles-buying public had become adjusted to the new way in which the industry would promote new singles - i.e. opt for six weeks' radio and TV airplay pre-release, thereby building up whatever interest there was in that song/artist into what they hoped would be sufficient pent-up demand for all interested consumers to rush out and purchase the CD/cassette\download in its first week on sale, and hey presto, maximise its chart potential straight away by (usually) achieving its peak position on week one, often with quite precipitous collapses down the chart from week two onwards, even of those which managed to register a high entry position. This altered the typical behaviour of singles to all-but-eradicate sustained upward movement from any position.

The public were adapted to that form of marketing, but the arrival and eventual integration of the monetised legal digital download began to unravel this, allowing more tracks to grow organically from lower-down the list, sometimes as an album-only cut before receiving a formal single release, and so it started to render the sub-40 and even sub-75 or 100 positions more relevant again in the overall behaviour of songs in the UK charts. Some keenly-anticipated releases from key artists continued to be held back to create the head of steam enough to enter at a higher notch, but since 2015 that has dwindled noticeably, with the industry's focus switching back to the more traditional 'on air: on sale' approach to digital singles, and the rapid rise of audio and video streaming as the dominant means of consuming all music, which has inevitably created a much slower chart with far-fewer entries across the spectrum each week, but with the propensity for very protracted climbs and falls (even with the new rules in place which artificially escalate declines and remove multiple tracks from single artists in order to inflate the positions of fresher titles).

I think to undertake a project on entries below 75 for the 1990s/2000s era would only be something a truly-dedicated chart completist would ever want to do, given the sheer amount of material to compile each week, and they'd need to either be unemployed or retired to have the time to do it!
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Postby wranglerjeans » Thu Jan 10, 2019 6:36 pm

I agree with that! Time is definitely a limitation and to be honest, much as I enjoy some music from 1990's, this would appear to be less so interesting. Anyway if you use Zobbel's excellent magazines (apart from 1996, 1997 and 1998 which you have to buy and I did!) from 1995 and then from 1999 to 2010, all these tracks that made 76 to 100 are included but much more as it is in fact a Top 200 he uses! I also know that they contradict Official Chart Company's website but I think there are some mistakes in this data on OCC website anyway! For example on 27th March 2004, at number 97, a track by P. Diddy titled Victory 2004 is listed for a single week. According to my further research, this was only released in America never here, but all of the other tracks are listed in Zobbel's work apart from this solitary track. Plus I have found various spelling mistakes and bands and singers names are wrong in places too, therefore although it is interesting to see the full Top 100's, feel that Zobbel is more reliable overall in this respect.
I actually have a full list of tracks that did not make UK Top 40 which entered between positions 41 and 75 from when the chart reverted back from a Top 100 to Top 75 on 13th April 1991 right up to the end of 2005! It took me ages to do but as all the British chart books listed these hits, I wanted to compile a list of these for posterity! I have already posted the small selection of tracks that again entered between 41 and 75 but did climb into Top 40 for the same time period.
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