UK Politics - unemployment at lowest levels since 1975

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Do you support the call for reform of the UK electoral system?

Yes - it should be reformed to reflect proportional representation, whereby the total number of votes a party receives decides the number of seats it gets in the House of Commons.
10
63%
No - the system is fine the way it is, First Past the Post is how it's always been done and it's how it should continue to be done.
5
31%
Other - specify in topic.
1
6%
 
Total votes : 16

Postby heppolo » Sat Jul 15, 2017 7:43 am

No one is willing to give Theresa a break, even a romanian journalist
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Postby Wayne » Sun Aug 20, 2017 4:25 pm

'Hard' Brexit offers '£135bn annual boost' to economy

Removing all trade tariffs and barriers would help generate an annual £135bn uplift to the UK economy, according to a group of pro-Brexit economists.

A "hard" Brexit is "economically much superior to soft" argues Prof Patrick Minford, lead author of a report from Economists for Free Trade.

He says eliminating tariffs, either within free trade deals or unilaterally, would deliver huge gains.

Other economists say cutting barriers sets off a "race to the bottom".

Economist Monique Ebell from the National Institute of Social and Economic Research (NIESR) says Prof Minford "ignores decades of evidence on how trade actually works".

Ms Ebell's own research showed that if the UK left the single market but made unilateral trade deals with major developing economies and the Anglosphere, it would only claw back about one-third of the 20-30% reduction in lost total trade by leaving the EU.

Ms Ebell says many of the trade barriers that Prof Minford argues to be removed are subtle, non-tariff barriers, such as agreed common standards.

Campaigners against a hard Brexit said the plan amounts to "economic suicide".

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-40972776
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Postby heppolo » Mon Aug 21, 2017 7:23 pm

a group of pro-Brexit economists
I suppose the inevitable mismatch between the capabilities and expectations is underestimated by those economists.
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Postby Wayne » Sun Sep 03, 2017 2:34 pm

Brexit: UK to be 'educated' about consequences, says Barnier

The EU's Brexit negotiator has said he sees the process as an opportunity to "teach the British people and others what leaving the EU means".

Michel Barnier said he would never resort to blackmail but saw it as his job to "educate" the UK about the price it would pay for leaving the EU "club".

The UK has hit back, saying the EU does "not want to talk about the future".

Brexit Secretary David Davis said it was "frightened" and the UK would not be bounced into a divorce bill deal.

The latest salvos come after a week of talks in Brussels about the UK's withdrawal from the EU - scheduled to take place in March 2019 - which increased tensions between the two sides.

The EU suggested little substantive progress had been made on three key "separation" issues, the size of the UK's financial liabilities to the EU, the future of the Irish border and citizens' rights after Brexit.

Mr Barnier accused the UK of "nostalgia" and cast doubt on whether enough progress had been made to broaden the discussions, in the autumn, to consider the UK's post-Brexit trading relationship with the EU.

This led to a frosty response from British ministers, one of whom, International Trade Secretary Liam Fox, said the UK would not be blackmailed into doing a deal on money in order to open discussions on trade.

'Serious consequences'

Speaking at a conference in Italy on Saturday, Mr Barnier said he did not want to punish the UK for leaving but said Brexit would be "an educational process" for the British.

"I have a state of mind - not aggressive... but I'm not naïve," he told the Ambrosetti forum.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-41140564
Yes Michel Barnier - PLEASE educate us, I beg of you. :roll: This ignorance is something I shan't miss - still not on board with Brexit, but I'm pleased we are hanging in there with the negotiations.
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Postby stevyy » Sun Sep 03, 2017 4:14 pm

let's be real, there is too much hatred of both sides. they won't get a deal done which would be beneficiery for both sides... by March 2019, no deal is done and the EU and UK split without any further relations which means that EU citizens who work in the UK will be thrown out, thousands of businesses will close on both sides, and many many ppl will lose their lives work, pensions and what not.

Ireland will have to secure its border again, forced by the EU to prevent British companies to benefit from EU trade and vice versa.

The Euro will lose value which will make GER extremely over-competitive to the resentment of the other countries. Spain will most like default and with it Italy, Portugal, Greece, France and Germany. Then the world is pushed into a global recession and financial breakdown. With the EU knocked out the US will default, then China, then India, then Brazil... etc.
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Postby Wayne » Sun Sep 03, 2017 4:28 pm

stevyy wrote:let's be real, there is too much hatred of both sides. they won't get a deal done which would be beneficiery for both sides... by March 2019, no deal is done and the EU and UK split without any further relations which means that EU citizens who work in the UK will be thrown out, thousands of businesses will close on both sides, and many many ppl will lose their lives work, pensions and what not.

Ireland will have to secure its border again, forced by the EU to prevent British companies to benefit from EU trade and vice versa.
None of these things will happen.

The only part of your post that's relevant is the bolded part.

The EU needs to recognise that in damaging the UK, they are damaging one of the biggest economies in the world - and consequently, their own existence, And the UK needs to realise that everything cannot remain the same - there needs to be concessions on both sides and both sides need to be more humble.

My point here is that Barnier's grandstanding doesn't help - this is an agreement, not a "we say, you do".
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Postby Rihab » Sun Sep 03, 2017 8:47 pm

stevyy wrote:The Euro will lose value
Actually, the Euro has been gaining massively against all other important currencies lately, including the dollar and the pound. So much so that before the end of the year, it will likely reach parity with the pound for the first time ever. Mess in the US and the UK is good for the Euro, it makes the eurozone as a whole look like a haven of stability, despite some major crises in several of its member states.
By remaining firm in the Brexit negotiations, the EU is getting it 100% right for the first time in ages.
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Postby menime123 » Sun Sep 03, 2017 10:46 pm

I'm so over Brexit to be honest. There's too much noise around it all and very little action. I was a Remainer, but I do think the EU is doomed without us.
Girls Aloud: Only 5 years until their 20th anniversary reunion tour! (and only 5 years until I can change my signature...)
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Postby Wayne » Tue Sep 12, 2017 8:49 am

Only the beginning of the battle...

Brexit: EU repeal bill wins first Commons vote

The government's bid to extract the UK from EU law in time for Brexit has passed its first parliamentary test.

MPs backed the EU Withdrawal Bill by 326 votes to 290 despite critics warning that it represented a "power grab" by ministers.

The bill, which will end the supremacy of EU law in the UK, now moves onto its next parliamentary stage.

Ministers sought to reassure MPs by considering calls for safeguards over their use of new powers.

Prime Minister Theresa May welcomed the Commons vote in the early hours of Tuesday morning, saying the bill offered "certainty and clarity" - but Labour described it as an "affront to parliamentary democracy".

Having cleared the second reading stage, the bill will now face more attempts to change it with Conservative MPs believed to have tabled new amendments.

Previously referred to as the Great Repeal Bill, the EU Withdrawal Bill overturns the 1972 European Communities Act which took the UK into the then European Economic Community.

It will also convert all existing EU laws into UK law, to ensure there are no gaps in legislation on Brexit day.

Critics' concerns centre on ministers giving themselves the power to make changes to laws during this process without consulting MPs.

The government says it needs to be able to make minor technical changes to ensure a smooth transition, but fears were raised that ministers were getting sweeping powers to avoid parliamentary scrutiny.

More than 100 MPs had their say during the two-day second reading debate.

Labour, which denounced the "vague offers" of concessions, mostly voted against the bill.

Shadow Brexit secretary Sir Keir Starmer said the bill was a "naked power grab" by the government, adding that "this is a deeply disappointing result".

He said: "Labour will seek to amend and remove the worst aspects from the bill but the flaws are so fundamental it's hard to see how this could ever be made fit for purpose."

Lib Dem Brexit spokesman Tom Brake said MPs who backed the bill should feel "ashamed".

"This is a dark day for the mother of parliaments," he added.

Summing up the Commons debate, Justice Secretary David Lidington had said some criticism had been "exaggerated up to and beyond the point of hyperbole".

He said the bill would "enable us to have a coherent and functioning statute book" on the day the UK leaves the EU.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-41235522
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Postby Wayne » Wed Sep 13, 2017 1:24 pm

Saw this posted on LinkedIn:

The Office for National Statistics latest UK labour market stats

Main points for May to July 2017
  • Estimates from the Labour Force Survey show that, between February to April 2017 and May to July 2017, the number of people in work increased, the number of unemployed people fell, and the number of people aged from 16 to 64 not working and not seeking or available to work (economically inactive) also fell.
  • There were 32.14 million people in work, 181,000 more than for February to April 2017 and 379,000 more than for a year earlier.
  • The employment rate (the proportion of people aged from 16 to 64 who were in work) was 75.3%, the highest since comparable records began in 1971.
  • There were 1.46 million unemployed people (people not in work but seeking and available to work), 175,000 fewer than for a year earlier.
  • The unemployment rate (the proportion of those in work plus those unemployed, that were unemployed) was 4.3%, down from 4.9% for a year earlier and the lowest since 1975.
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Postby Wayne » Sun Sep 17, 2017 11:01 pm

Dame Tessa Jowell has brain cancer, family says

Former Olympics Minister Dame Tessa Jowell has been diagnosed with brain cancer, her family have revealed.

Her daughter-in-law Ella Woodward posted on social media that the Labour peer was diagnosed in May.

Writing on Dame Tessa's 70th birthday, she described the last few months as "some of the hardest of our lives".

The politician, who stood down as an MP in 2015, responded by tweeting her thanks for the "love and support" she had been shown.

Ms Woodward, a food blogger who is married to the politician's son Matt Mills, wrote on Instagram: "Matt's Mum was suddenly diagnosed with brain cancer in May.

"Her bravery, optimism, love and support for others during this process has inspired us both so much, and today we're all pledging to try and do everything we can to make people's lives with cancer better for longer.
Very sad news, always liked Tessa! Hoping she's doing well and makes a full recovery.
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Postby heppolo » Mon Sep 18, 2017 10:16 am

Wayne wrote:Saw this posted on LinkedIn:

The Office for National Statistics latest UK labour market stats

Main points for May to July 2017
  • Estimates from the Labour Force Survey show that, between February to April 2017 and May to July 2017, the number of people in work increased, the number of unemployed people fell, and the number of people aged from 16 to 64 not working and not seeking or available to work (economically inactive) also fell.
  • There were 32.14 million people in work, 181,000 more than for February to April 2017 and 379,000 more than for a year earlier.
  • The employment rate (the proportion of people aged from 16 to 64 who were in work) was 75.3%, the highest since comparable records began in 1971.
  • There were 1.46 million unemployed people (people not in work but seeking and available to work), 175,000 fewer than for a year earlier.
  • The unemployment rate (the proportion of those in work plus those unemployed, that were unemployed) was 4.3%, down from 4.9% for a year earlier and the lowest since 1975.
A bit surprising for the Tory government but did they count the zero hours' ones as employed
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Postby stevyy » Mon Sep 18, 2017 10:41 am

that's great news about the UK.

Here is a list of the 10 European countries with the smallest unenmployment rate:

01 - 0,7% - Belarus
02 - 2,0% - Monaco
03 - 2,3% - Liechtenstein
04 - 2,8% - Iceland
05 - 2,9% - Andorra
06 - 4,0% - Germany
07 - 4,2% - Hungary
08 - 4,2% - Moldova
09 - 4,3% - United Kingdom
10 - 4,8% - Netherlands

--
45 - 23,0% - Greece

I highlighted the major economies.
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Postby heppolo » Mon Sep 18, 2017 1:58 pm

01 - 0,7% - Belarus
My country at number one somewhere :D
The trick is this is the number of people who officially registered as unemployed and applied for social services. In Belarus the jobseeker's allowance is about 10£ a month.
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Postby heppolo » Fri Nov 03, 2017 5:32 pm

we are witnessing the stratospheric rise of Gavin Williamson, from the Chief Whip to being the Defence Secretary.
Some original House of Cards type of thing going on.
Step aside, BoJo, here's the next Tory big thing.
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