Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 456
Results 126 to 136 of 136

Thread: "Pick and Top of the Pops" No 1's

  1. #126
    zeus555's Avatar
    Superstar
    Join Date
    28 Jun 2005
    Posts
    5,895
    Mentioned
    17 Post(s)

    by » Sat September 14th, 2019, 22:56

    Regarding The Beatles UK No.1 Singles...

    I've just checked and their only No.1 Entry in the 'Official' UK Chart was 'Get Back'. That
    entered at No.1, in April 1969. It was their 16th 'Official' UK No.1 Single, out of 17. They
    had 15 No.1 Singles in the Record Retailer Chart, and 2 No.1's in the 'Official' BMRB Chart.
    They took over compiling the 'Official' UK Charts, in February 1969, when the Record Retailer
    Charts ended.

    However, in the 'New Musical Express' Chart, The Beatles had 18 No.1 Singles and 8 of them entered
    at No.1. Their 1st No.1 Entry was 'I Want To Hold Your Hand', in December 1963. It Entered at No.10
    in the Record Retailer Chart. Their 8th & final 'NME' No.1 Entry was 'All You Need Is Love', in July 1967.
    That Entered at No.2 in the Record Retailer Chart.

    Ironically, 'Get Back', their only 'Official' No.1 Entry, was not one of their 8 No.1 Entries in the 'NME'
    Chart. It Entered at No.3 in that Chart...

    I've no idea how many No.1 Entries The Beatles had in the 'Melody Maker' Singles Chart. Assuming that
    they had any at all...I now see that they had 19 No.1 Singles in the 'Melody Maker' Charts. 8 of them
    Entered at No.1. Their 1st No.1 Entry, was 'I Want To Hold Your Hand', in December 1963. Their 8th &
    final No.1 Entry, was 'Hey Jude', in September 1968. 'Get Back' Entered at No.2, in 'Melody Maker'.


    Zeus555
    Last edited by zeus555; Sun September 15th, 2019 at 03:26.

  2. #127
    RokinRobinOfLocksley's Avatar

    Join Date
    10 Sep 2013
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Posts
    231
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    by » Sun September 15th, 2019, 02:17

    Zeus555, you need to read Alan Smith's article, "Beatles chart positions in ALL UK charts":

    https://www.ukmix.org/showthread.php?87371

    As to the Melody Maker singles chart, The Beatles had 19 #1's, 8 debuts at #1, but different from NME. The first debut at #1 was "I Want to Hold Your Hand"; the last debut at #1 was "Hey Jude". All is revealed in the above link.

    Just to clarify, "Get Back" debuted at #1 on the BMRB chart which was carried in Record Retailer; it did not debut at #1 on the Record Retailer chart, as that ended in Feb 1969.

  3. #128
    RokinRobinOfLocksley's Avatar

    Join Date
    10 Sep 2013
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Posts
    231
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    by » Sun September 15th, 2019, 02:22

    Sorry, I couldn't resist posting this quote that I just saw on facebook:

    "A lie doesn't become truth,
    wrong doesn't become right,
    and evil doesn't become good,
    just because it's accepted by a majority."

    --Booker T. Washington

  4. #129
    zeus555's Avatar
    Superstar
    Join Date
    28 Jun 2005
    Posts
    5,895
    Mentioned
    17 Post(s)

    by » Sun September 15th, 2019, 03:10

    RokinRobinOflocksley - Thanks for the information in your reply Post, to me. I've now re-written
    part of my own Post, to incorporate the New Facts, that you gave to me.

    My name is Colin, by the way. Yours may, or may not, be Robin...

    The Official UK Charts Company Site gives The Beatles 65 Weeks, at No.1, in the UK Singles Chart.

    It should be 69 Weeks at No.1. The Site credits 'Get Back' with just 2 No.1 Weeks, when it was
    on Top for 6 Weeks. That is where The OCC's 'missing' 4 Beatles No.1 Singles Weeks have gone.
    I - and others - have told The OCC about their mistakes, on more than one occasion. The OCC
    pay no attention to us, and carry on giving The Beatles 65 No.1 Singles Weeks, instead of 69
    and 'Get Back' 2 No.1 Weeks, instead of 6...


    Zeus555
    Last edited by zeus555; Sun September 15th, 2019 at 03:32.

  5. #130
    Splodj's Avatar

    Join Date
    25 Jul 2019
    Posts
    32
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    by » Sun September 22nd, 2019, 14:39

    When it is said that Chinnery ignored the RR entry position for a Beatles single when the other charts entered it at number one, this implies that there was a special rule for the Beatles. But as this started with Can't Buy Me Love, and his heirarchy method for determining number ones started in 1964 and was operable in time for House Of The Rising Sun, it seems to me that he was just applying the new no. 1 heirarchy method across the board rather than anything special for the Beatles.

  6. #131
    RokinRobinOfLocksley's Avatar

    Join Date
    10 Sep 2013
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Posts
    231
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    by » Sun September 22nd, 2019, 22:09

    Quote Originally Posted by Splodj View Post
    When it is said that Chinnery ignored the RR entry position for a Beatles single when the other charts entered it at number one, this implies that there was a special rule for the Beatles. But as this started with Can't Buy Me Love, and his heirarchy method for determining number ones started in 1964 and was operable in time for House Of The Rising Sun, it seems to me that he was just applying the new no. 1 heirarchy method across the board rather than anything special for the Beatles.
    Right, this '#1 rule' applied to every artist after it was put into effect, not just The Beatles. The Animals "House OTRS" and The Rolling Stones "The Last Time" both benefited. There could be more, could be a lot more. I don't recall seeing a Dave Taylor/Trevor Ager list for every time this happened, I reckon we'll just have to run the numbers ourselves, ha...

  7. #132
    Splodj's Avatar

    Join Date
    25 Jul 2019
    Posts
    32
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    by » Mon September 23rd, 2019, 20:46

    As an indication of how more important the charts were regarded then, I recall a headline in the top-selling Daily Mirror about how the Tottenham boys had ousted the Beatles when 'Glad All Over' reached number one. I do not subscribe to the Mirror archive, but guess this was on 7-Jan-64 when the chart they published would have shown that. Their readers would then have been confused by the Beatles still being tied at number one with the DC5 in the subsequent TOTP and POTP chart.

  8. #133
    MrTibbs's Avatar

    Join Date
    24 Oct 2012
    Posts
    30
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    by » Tue October 1st, 2019, 11:41

    I think its a retrospective shame that the BBC didn't take their chart compilation much more seriously. Their basic idea was sound, that by averaging out all charts this excluded rogue positions out of sync with the majority of others and gave a sound average position.

    However their methodology was not robust and too simplistic to do justice to the averaging process. To start with they should have used a definitive method for splitting ties from the start, such as breaking ties by using which paper polled most shops, NME till July 1960 and then Melody Maker.
    To make matters worse they then kept changing the rules on how ties were split depending on who compiled the chart, Chinnery or Jones later, it was also riddled with basic arithmetical miscalculations on many occasions when a simple double check would have corrected these. They moved the goal posts in 1964 as to how a number one was determined over the previous years. For a period between 1960 and 1962 Record Mirror's chart was excluded because of their later compilation date, and so on.

    All these inconsistencies effectively diminished it's accuracy, credibility and consistency. All the more surprising when you consider this chart was broadcast seen and heard by millions on both Top Of The Pops and Pick Of The Pops and taken as gospel by those watching and listening. I believe it should also have been publicised much better like perhaps weekly in the Radio Times which could only have improved its profile as perhaps the leading chart of the time.

  9. #134
    Graham76man's Avatar
    Superstar
    Join Date
    26 Jul 2010
    Location
    Sheffield
    Posts
    5,228
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)

    by » Tue October 1st, 2019, 12:55

    I think you have to remember that in the early 60's the BBC did not take Pop Music seriously. Top of the Pops was broadcast in a old church in Manchester, far away from Broadcasting House. They didn't want the long haired lots hanging around TV centre! They didn't really care who was involved with pop music (hence Saville) nor the process that were needed to put it on. The arty types just had to get on with it and the limited resources they had. The BBC's main interest was having something in the pop music style to compete with ITV. The BBC didn't like playing pop music on the radio, but was being pressured into doing so by the public and the new pirate radio stations. Pick of the Pops was a way to broadcast a prepared playlist of songs that were improved by the censor at the BBC. Hence the word "Pick". Fluff could bypass a sex related or banned record by saying the title and going on to the next approved record. With every word he said spoken from the script in front of him. The people in charge of the BBC were more interested in the news, or old forms of culture such as opera and classical music. They would have never considered any form of pop music to be seen in Radio Times weekly as it was for those "Stupid boy" and girls and a fad at that. Charts were also the American style top 40. And there's no-way any old hat at the BBC would tolerate that. Nor for that matter the establishment would have at that time. As American popular culture was being blamed for the social evil spreading around the UK.
    So it's not surprising really that the charts were cobbled together. By the end of the sixties it was clear that pop music was no fad and the BBC needed proper charts, as they had already invested in Radio One, a proper chart was needed for that station and TOTP to broadcast.
    Education for anyone aged 12 to 16 has made a mess of the world!

  10. #135
    Splodj's Avatar

    Join Date
    25 Jul 2019
    Posts
    32
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    by » Tue October 1st, 2019, 23:55

    A major reason why the show was 'pick' of the pops, rather than a straightforward chart rundown, was so that it could contain a section on new releases - which were exempt from Needle Time.
    Last edited by Splodj; Mon October 14th, 2019 at 20:33.

  11. #136
    Splodj's Avatar

    Join Date
    25 Jul 2019
    Posts
    32
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    by » Tue October 1st, 2019, 23:56

    The BBC website now has 'Radio 2's Ultimate Beatles Quiz'.

    Naturally there are some chart related questions. Q6 asks at what position 'Love Me Do' peaked; there is no mention of 'official chart', but unsurprisingly the outlier 17 position of RR is the answer.

    Next the question I was dreading, asking what was their first number one - and this time specifying the official chart. When you click on 'From Me To You' the commentary includes: "Their previous single 'Please Please Me' had topped other unofficial versions of the UK singles chart."

    This demonstrates how making the RR charts of 1963 'official' is rewriting history, as no-one at the time regarded them as such - including the BBC.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •